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Unread postPosted: Fri Jun 12, 2009 8:01 pm
  

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Knight

Joined: Mon Jul 14, 2008 5:02 pm
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Comment: NEVER QUIT..... I got lucky
Firefox
By the early 1980s, numerous innovations had come to popular cinema: darker plots, better technical effects, personality-driven actors, the antihero. Many of these could be seen in "Firefox," the movie version of a high-tech espionage thriller novel.
Produced and directed by Clint Eastwood, who also acted in the lead role, the basic plot was not complicated: a raffish soldier-of-fortune type fighter pilot is smuggled into the Soviet Union to steal a fabulously-advanced "MiG-31" fighter plane nicknamed "Firefox." This warplane was so futuristic that its pilot could fly it by thought alone. The hero filched the plane (from the Edwards weight-and-balance hangar), and the great chase began. The movie’s characters were more complex and intense than their counterparts of the1950s, and the mood of the picture was often surly. But at bottom it was aerial action which counted with the audience, and the film offered plenty of that.
Much of the filming was done on the Edwards ramp, where an F-4 Phantom and a T-38 had been made available for cockpit shots. The large hangar was also used for the night scenes. As with the other movies, the Flight Test Center provided general support as well, and many of the base personnel enjoyed the chance to appear in the film as extras.

For the real aircraft of this designation, see Mikoyan MiG-31.
The MiG-31 (МиГ-31 in Cyrillic script), NATO reporting name "Firefox", is a fictional aircraft appearing in Craig Thomas' novels Firefox and Firefox Down, as well as the Clint Eastwood movie based on the former.
The Firefox is an interceptor aircraft with stealth capabilities, to the point that it is invisible to radar. It is powered by two incredibly powerful "Turmansky" (a probable misspelling of Tumansky) turbo-ramjet engines that permit flight at hypersonic speeds, but their exhaust gives the Firefox a prominent infrared signature. The Firefox's most famous feature is its Thought-Controlled Weapons System, which uses signals from the pilot's brain to target enemies and fire weapons; however, it only responds to commands thought in Russian. The Firefox's weapons consist of up to four AA-6 Acrid air-to-air missiles (modified for thought guidance), two 23 mm cannons, and four Rear Defense Pods, which fire an explosive charge at a pursuing aircraft or missile.
Other capabilities of the Firefox include a 3,000-mile (4,800 km) range and a flight ceiling over 120,000 feet (37,000 m). To give the pilot full situational awareness the aircraft also includes a camera system that allows the pilot to see images ahead of, below, and directly behind the aircraft on his console. Mitchell Gant uses this system several times during his flight to keep track of missiles, and other aircraft pursuing him.
Two production prototypes were built before it was to be deployed into active service for the Soviet Air Force. The first prototype was stolen by Mitchell Gant operating on behalf of the Western intelligence community. The second prototype intercepted Gant and the two aircraft entered into combat with Gant destroying his adversary.
In Firefox Down, it is revealed the remaining prototype's fuel lines were ruptured in the dogfight that concluded the previous novel and the aircraft crash-lands in Finland. One of the plot lines of Firefox Down is the race between the Soviets and Western Intelligence to recover the aircraft submerged in a frozen Finnish lake.
The Firefox's appearance differs between the first novel and film. The version in the novel resembles a MiG-25 Foxbat, much like the real MiG-31 Foxhound. In the film, its appearance (see above picture) is more like a VF-4 Lightning III than any Mikoyan fighter.
Cockpit scenes used shots from a F4 Phantom and T-38 Talon.

http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/ ... efox-1.jpg
http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/ ... efox-3.jpg
http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/ ... efox-5.jpg

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Unread postPosted: Fri Jun 12, 2009 8:02 pm
  

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Knight

Joined: Mon Jul 14, 2008 5:02 pm
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Comment: NEVER QUIT..... I got lucky
Dassault Mirage III
The Dassault Mirage 2000 is a French multirole fighter jet manufactured by Dassault Aviation. Designed in the late 1970s as a lightweight fighter for the French Air Force, it evolved into a successful multirole aircraft now in service in 9 countries with more than 600 Mirages built.
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... gognes.jpg
Armament and payload
The Mirage 2000 is equipped with built-in twin DEFA 554 (now GIAT 30-550 F4) 30 mm revolver-type cannons with 125 rounds each. The cannons have selectable fire rates of 1,200 or 1,800 rounds per minute. Each round weigh 275 g and have a muzzle velocity of around 800 m/s.
The Mirage 2000 can carry up to 6.3 tonnes (13,900 lb) (or 7 tonnes for -9 version) of stores on nine pylons, with two pylons on each wing and five under the fuselage. External stores include:
• Matra Super 530 medium-range semi-active radar-guided air-to-air missile on the inboard wing pylons and underbelly one.
• MICA missiles are replacing the previous. They are available only on the Mirage 2000-5 and further models. They have multiple advantages over previous missiles such as their weight, only 110 kg compared to 250-270 kg. This allows the aircraft to carry up to 5 missiles under the belly. The data-link, active radar and auto-pilot make these weapons comparable to the heavier AMRAAM. The range is around 60 km, even more than the Super R.530D. So a Mirage 2000-5 with 4 MICA can engage four targets at the same time up to 60 km range, while a Mirage 2000 RDI can engage only two (not at the same time) within 40 km.
• Matra Magic short-range infrared-seeking AAM on the outboard wing pylons. Other missiles are compatible, because Magic itself was meant as 'Sidewinder compatible', so AIM-9J/P/L are often used on exported Mirages, and often other IR missiles are also in the Mirages panoply.
• The Mirage 2000C can carry air-to-ground stores such as the Matra 68 mm rocket pods (18 each), iron bombs (both French 250, 400, 1000 kg and Mk 80s series), and cluster bombs like Belouga or foreigner models. Some sub-version, especially those equipped with RDM (mainly used in export models) have the capability to use the Exocet anti-ship missiles.
A fixed removable refuelling probe can be attached in front of the cockpit, offset slightly to the right of center.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/e ... ntries.png
General characteristics
• Crew: 1
• Length: 14.36 m (47 ft 1 in)
• Wingspan: 9.13 m (29 ft)
• Height: 5.20 m (17 ft)
• Wing area: 41 m² (441.3 ft²)
• Empty weight: 7,500 kg (16,350 lb)
• Loaded weight: 13,800 kg (30,420 lb)
• Max takeoff weight: 17,000 kg (37,500 lb)
• Powerplant: 1× SNECMA M53-P2 afterburning turbofan
o Dry thrust: 64.3 kN (14,500 lbf)
o Thrust with afterburner: 95.1 kN (21,400 lbf)
Performance
• Maximum speed: Mach 2.2 (2,333+ km/h, 1,450+ mph) at altitude/ 1,110 km/hr (690 mph) at low altitude
• Range: 1,550 km (837 nmi, 963 mi) with drop tanks
• Ferry range: 3,335 km (1,800 nmi, 2,073 mi) with auxiliary fuel
• Service ceiling: 17,060 m (59,000 ft)
• Rate of climb: 285 m/s (56,000 ft/min)
• Wing loading: 337 kg/m² (69 lb/ft²)
• Thrust/weight: 0.91
Armament
• Guns: 2× 30 mm (1.18 in) DEFA 554 revolver cannon, 125 rounds per gun
• Hardpoints: 9 total (4× under-wing, 5× under-fuselage) with a capacity of 6,300 kg (13,900 lb) external fuel and ordnance, viewtopic.php?f=9&t=102849

• Rockets: Matra 68 mm unguided rocket pods, 18 rockets per pod
• Missiles:
o Air-to-air missiles:
 6× MBDA MICA IR/RF
 2× Matra R550 Magic-II and 2× Matra Super 530D
o Air-to-surface missiles:
 2× AM.39 Exocet
 2× AS-30L laser guided missile
 1× ASMP tactical nuclear cruise missile
• Bombs: 9× Mk.82
Avionics
• Thomson-CSF RDY (Radar Doppler Multi-target) radar





Dassault Mirage 5


The Dassault Mirage 5 is a supersonic attack aircraft designed in France by Dassault Aviation during the 1960s, and manufactured both in France and a number of other countries. It was derived from Dassault's extremely successful Mirage III fighter, and spawned several variants of its own.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... 06980.JPEG
General characteristics
• Crew: 1
• Length: 15 m (49 ft 3.5 in)
• Wingspan: 8.22 m (26 ft 11 in)
• Height: 4.5 m (14 ft 9 in)
• Wing area: 34.85 m² (375 ft²)
• Empty weight: 7,050 kg (15,600 lb)
• Max takeoff weight: 13,500 kg (29,700 lb)
• Powerplant: 1× SNECMA Atar 09C turbojet
Performance
• Maximum speed: Mach 2.2 (2,350 km/h, 1,460 mph)
• Range: 2,400 km (1,300 nm, 1,500 mi)
• Service ceiling: 17,000 m (56,000 ft)
• Rate of climb: 83.3 m/s (16,400 ft/min)
• Wing loading: 387 kg/m² (79 lb/ft²)
• Thrust/weight: 0.46
Armament
• Guns: 2× 30 mm (1.18 in) DEFA 552 cannons with 125 rounds per gun
• Rockets: 2× Matra JL-100 drop tank/rocket pack, each with 19× SNEB 68 mm rockets and 66 US gallons (250 liters) of fuel
• Missiles: 2× AIM-9 Sidewinders OR Matra R550 Magics plus 1× Matra R530
• Bombs: 8,800 lb (4,000 kg) of payload on five external hardpoints, including a variety of bombs, reconnaissance pods or Drop tanks

Atlas Cheetah


The Atlas Cheetah was a fighter aircraft operated by the South African Air Force (SAAF) between 1986 and 2008. It was first built as a major upgrade of the Dassault Mirage III by the Atlas Aircraft Corporation (later Denel) of South Africa (established 1965) in South Africa. Three different variants were created, the dual-seat Cheetah D, and the single-seat Cheetah E and Cheetah C. The Cheetah E was retired in 1992, and the SAAF had a mixture of 28 Cheetah Cs and Cheetah Ds in operational service until 2008, when they were retired as the SAAF accepted into service the first of 26 Saab JAS 39 Gripens (17C/9D) which replaced them.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... 29crop.jpg

General characteristics
• Crew: one, pilot
• Length: 15.55 m (51.0 ft)
• Wingspan: 8.22 m (26.97 ft)
• Height: 4.50 m (14.76 ft)
• Wing area: 35 m² (376.7 ft²)
• Empty weight: 6,600 kg (14,550 lb)
• Max takeoff weight: 13,700 kg (30,200 lb)
• Powerplant: 1× Snecma Atar 9K50C-11 turbojet, 7,200 kgf (71 kN, 15,900 lbf)
• Canard Area: 17.87 ft² (1.66 m²)
Performance
• Maximum speed:
o At altitude: Mach 2.2 (1,460 mph, 2,350 km/h)
o At sea level: Mach 1.13 (865 mph, 1,390 km/h)
• Range: 700 nmi (1,300 km)
• Ferry range: 1,400 nmi (2,600km)
• Service ceiling: 55,755 ft (17,000 m)
• Rate of climb: 45,950 ft/min (14,000 m/min)
• Wing loading: 250 kg/m² (52 lb/ft²)
• Thrust/weight: 15,873 lb (70.6 kN) with Afterburner
• Maximum g-load: Unknown
Armament
• Guns: 2× 30 mm (1.18 in) DEFA 552 cannons with 125 rounds per gun
• Rockets: 4× Matra rocket pods with 18× SNEB 68 mm rockets each, OR 2× Matra JL-100 drop tank/rocket pack, each with 19× SNEB 68 mm rockets and 66 US gallons (250 liters) of fuel
• Missiles: 2× Python 3 AAMs, V4 R-Darter (BVR missile), U/Darter, V3C Darter
• Bombs: 8,800 lb (4,400 kg) of payload on five external hardpoints
viewtopic.php?f=9&t=102849
• , including 250 kg Laser-guided bombs (LGB), GPS-guided bombs, 250 kg 'booster' bombs, a variety of unguided 'iron' bombs, reconnaissance pods or Drop tanks


Dassault Mirage III
The Mirage III is a supersonic fighter aircraft designed in France by Dassault Aviation during the late 1950s, and manufactured both in France and a number of other countries. It was a successful fighter aircraft, being sold to many air forces around the world and remaining in production for over a decade. Some of the world's smaller air forces still fly Mirage IIIs or variants as front-line equipment today.
General characteristics
• Crew: 1
• Length: 15 m (49 ft 3.5 in)
• Wingspan: 8.22 m (26 ft 11 in)
• Height: 4.5 m (14 ft 9 in)
• Wing area: 34.85 m² (375 ft²)
• Empty weight: 7,050 kg (15,600 lb)
• Max takeoff weight: 13,500 kg (29,700 lb)
• Powerplant: 1× SNECMA Atar 09C turbojet
Performance
• Maximum speed: Mach 2.2 (2,350 km/h, 1,460 mph)
• Range: 2,400 km (1,300 NM, 1,500 mi)
• Service ceiling: 17,000 m (56,000 ft)
• Rate of climb: 83.3 m/s (16,400 ft/min)
• Wing loading: 387 kg/m² (79 lb/ft²)
Armament
• Guns: 2× 30 mm (1.18 in) DEFA 552 cannons with 125 rounds per gun
• Rockets: 2× Matra JL-100 drop tank/rocket pack, each with 19× SNEB 68 mm rockets and 66 US gallons (250 liters) of fuel
• Missiles: 2× AIM-9 Sidewinders OR Matra R550 Magics plus 1× Matra R530, 2× AM-39 Exocet anti-ship missiles
• Bombs: 4,000 kg (8,800 lb) of payload on five external hardpoints, including a variety of bombs, reconnaissance pods or Drop tanks; French Air Force IIIEs through 1991, equipped for AN-52 nuclear bomb).
• Hard points 4 per wing viewtopic.php?f=9&t=102849

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... III_1.JPEG

_________________
let your YES be YES and your NO be NO but plz no maybe


Last edited by ZINO on Wed Jun 17, 2009 7:11 am, edited 2 times in total.

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Unread postPosted: Fri Jun 12, 2009 8:03 pm
  

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Knight

Joined: Mon Jul 14, 2008 5:02 pm
Posts: 4008
Location: new york
Comment: NEVER QUIT..... I got lucky
The Sukhoi Su-34

(Russian: Сухой Су-34) (export designation Su-32, NATO reporting name Fullback) is an advanced Russian 2-seat fighter-bomber and strike aircraft. It is intended to eventually replace the Sukhoi Su-24.
General characteristics
• Crew: Two
• Length: 23.34 m (72 ft 2 in)
• Wingspan: 14.7 m (48 ft 3 in)
• Height: 6.09 m (19 ft 5 in)
• Loaded weight: 39,000 kg (85,980 lb)
• Useful load: 8,000 kg (17,600 lb)
• Max takeoff weight: 45,100 kg (99,425 lb)
• Powerplant: 2× Lyulka AL-35F turbofans, 137.2 kN (30,845 lbf) with afterburner each
Performance
• Maximum speed:
o High altitude: Mach 1.8 (1,900 km/h, 1,180 mph)
o Low altitude: Mach 1.2 (1,400 km/h, 870 mph) at sea level
• Combat radius: 1,100 km (680 mi)
• Ferry range: 4,000 km (2,490 mi)
• Service ceiling: 15,000 m (49,200 ft)
• Wing loading: 629 kg/m² (129 lb/ft²)
• Thrust/weight: 0.68
Armament
• 1 × 30 mm GSh-30-1 (9A-4071K) cannon, 150 rounds
• 2 × wingtip rails for R-73 (AA-11 'Archer') air-to-air missiles
• 10 × wing and fuselage stations
viewtopic.php?f=9&t=102849 for up to 8,000 kg (17,630 lb) of ordnance, including Kh-29L/T, Kh-25MT/ML, Kh-25MP, Kh-36, Kh-38, Kh-41, Kh-59M, Kh-58, Kh-31P, Kh-35 Ural, Kh-41, Kh-65S, Kh-SD, 2 Moskit, 3 × Jachont air-to-ground missiles, KAB-500L/KR or KAB-1500L guided bombs, unguided bombs, B-8 rocket pods with 20 × 80 mm S-8 rockets, B-13 rocket pods with 5 × 122 mm S-13 rockets, O-25 rocket pods with 1 × 340 mm S-25 rocket, fuel tanks, EW- and reconnaissance pods.
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... _Su-34.jpg






Sukhoi Su-24


The Sukhoi Su-24 (NATO reporting name Fencer) was the Soviet Union's most advanced all-weather interdiction and attack aircraft in the 1970s and 1980s. The two-seat, twin-engined aircraft carried the USSR's first integrated digital nav/attack system. In many aspects, the Su-24's configuration is similar to that of the F-111. It remains in service with former Soviet air forces and various export nations.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... r_down.jpg

General characteristics
• Crew: Two (pilot and weapons system operator)
• Length: 22.53 m (73 ft 11 in)
• Wingspan: 17.64 m extended, 10.37 m maximum sweep (57 ft 10 in / 34 ft 0 in)
• Height: 6.19 m (20 ft 4 in)
• Wing area: 55.2 m² (594 ft²)
• Empty weight: 22,300 kg (49,165 lb)
• Loaded weight: 38,040 kg (83,865 lb)
• Max takeoff weight: 43,755 kg (96,505 lb)
• Powerplant: 2× Saturn/Lyulka AL-21F-3A turbojets
o Dry thrust: 75 kN (16,860 lbf) each
o Thrust with afterburner: 109.8 kN (24,675 lbf) each
• *Fuel capacity: 11,100 kg (24,470 lb)
Performance
• Maximum speed: 1,315 km/h (710 kn, 815 mph, Mach 1.07) at sea level; Mach 1.35 at high altitude
• Combat radius: 615 km in a lo-lo-lo attack mission with 3,000 kg (6,615 lb) ordnance and external tanks ()
• Ferry range: 2,775 km (1,500 nm, 1,725 mi)
• Service ceiling: 11,000 m (36,090 ft)
• Rate of climb: 150 m/s (29,530 ft/min)
• Wing loading: 651 kg/m² (133 lb/ft²)
• Thrust/weight: 0.60
• G-force limit: 6
• Takeoff roll: 1,550 m (5,085 ft)
• Landing roll: 1,100 m (3,610 ft)
Armament
• 1 × GSh-6-23 cannon, 500 rounds of ammunition
• 8 hard points, viewtopic.php?f=9&t=102849
• Up to 8,000 kg (17,640 lb) ordnance on 8 hard points, including up to 4 × Kh-23 (AS-7 'Kerry') radio-command missiles; up to 4 × Kh-25ML (AS-10 'Karen') laser-guided missiles; up to 2 × Kh-28 (AS-9 'Kyle'), Kh-58 (AS-11 'Kilter'), or Kh-31P (AS-17 'Krypton') anti-radiation missiles; up to 3 × Kh-29L/T (AS-14 'Kedge') laser/TV-guided missiles; up to 2 × Kh-59 'Ovod' (AS-13 'Kingbolt') TV-command guided missiles, or KAB-500KR TV-guided and KAB-500L laser-guided bombs.
• Unguided rocket launchers with 55 mm S-5 rockets, 80 mm S-8 rockets, or 120 mm S-13 rockets
• Other weapon options include general-purpose bombs, external gun pods, and tactical nuclear bombs.
• 2 × R-60 (AA-8 'Aphid') air-to-air missiles are normally carried for self-defense; upgrade aircraft can carry R-73 (AA-11 'Archer') as well.
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... _Su-24.png




Sukhoi Su-35




The Sukhoi Su-35 (formerly Su-27M)[4] (NATO designation: Flanker-E) is a 4.5 generation heavy class, long-range, multi-role, air superiority fighter and strike fighter. Due to the similar features and components it contains, the Sukhoi Su-35 is considered to be a close cousin of the Sukhoi Su-30MKI, a specialized version of the Su-30.[5] It has been further developed into the Su-35BM.[6] The Su-35 is in service in small numbers with the Russian Air Force with 12 in service as of 2008.[2]


General characteristics
• Crew: 1
• Length: 21.9 m (72.9 ft)
• Wingspan: 15.3 m (50.2 ft)
• Height: 5.90 m (19.4 ft)
• Wing area: 62.0 m² (667 ft²)
• Empty weight: 18,400 kg (40,500 lb)
• Loaded weight: 25,700 kg (56,660 lb)
• Max takeoff weight: 34,000 kg (75,000 lb)
• Powerplant: 2× Saturn/Lyulka AL-31FM turbofan
o Dry thrust: 7,600 kgf (74.5 kN, 16,750 lbf) each
o Thrust with afterburner: 12,800 kgf (126 kN, 28,200 lbf) each
Performance
• Maximum speed: Mach 2.35 (2,500 km/h, 1,553 mph) at altitude
• Range: 4,000 km (2,160 nmi)
• Service ceiling: 18,000 m (59,100 ft)
[edit] Su-35, 2000s version
Data from KNAAPO Su-35 page,[28] Su-35 booklet,[29] Gordon and Davidson,[26] MAKS 2007 Su-35 display[30]
General characteristics
• Crew: 1
• Length: 21.9 m (72.9 ft)
• Wingspan: 15.3 m (50.2 ft)
• Height: 5.90 m (19.4 ft)
• Wing area: 62.0 m² (667 ft²)
• Empty weight: 17,500 kg (38,600 lb)
• Loaded weight: 25,300 kg (56,660 lb)
• Max takeoff weight: 34,500 kg (76,060 lb)
• Powerplant: 2× Saturn 117S with TVC nozzles turbofan
o Dry thrust: 8,800 kgf[31] (86.3 kN, 19,400 lbf) each
o Thrust with afterburner: 14,500 kgf (142 kN, 31,900 lbf) each
Performance
• Maximum speed: Mach 2.25[28] (2,410 km/h, 1,500 mph) at altitude
• Range: 3,600 km (1,940 nmi) ; (1,580 km, 850 nmi near ground level)
• Ferry range: 4,500 km (2,430 nmi) with external fuel tanks
• Service ceiling: 18,000 m (59,100 ft)
• Rate of climb: >280 m/s (>55,100 ft/min)
• Wing loading: 408 kg/m² (84.9 lb/ft²)
• Thrust/weight: 1.14
Armament
• 1 × 30 mm GSh-30 cannon with 150 rounds
• 2 × wingtip rails for R-73 (AA-11 "Archer") air-to-air missiles or ECM pods viewtopic.php?f=9&t=102849
• 12 × wing and fuselage stations for up to 8,000 kg (17,630 lb) of ordnance, including: viewtopic.php?f=9&t=102849
• Air-to-Air Missiles
o AA-12 Adder (R-77)
o AA-11 Archer (R-73)
o AA-10 Alamo (R-27)
• Air-to-Surface Missiles
o AS-17 Krypton (Kh-31)
o AS-16 Kickback (Kh-15)
o AS-10 Karen (Kh-25ML)
o AS-14 Kedge (Kh-29)
o AS-15 Kent (Kh-55)
o AS-13 Kingbolt (Kh-59)
• Bombs
o KAB-500L
o KAB-1500 laser/TV Guided Bomb
o FAB-100/250/500/750/1000
Avionics
• Passive phased antenna array.


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... _Su-35.jpg

_________________
let your YES be YES and your NO be NO but plz no maybe


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Unread postPosted: Fri Jun 12, 2009 8:03 pm
  

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Knight

Joined: Mon Jul 14, 2008 5:02 pm
Posts: 4008
Location: new york
Comment: NEVER QUIT..... I got lucky
Eurofighter Typhoon
The Eurofighter Typhoon is a twin-engine canard-delta wing multirole aircraft. It is being designed and built by a consortium of three separate partner companies: Alenia Aeronautica, BAE Systems, and EADS working through a holding company Eurofighter GmbH which was formed in 1986. The project is managed by NETMA (NATO Eurofighter and Tornado Management Agency) which acts as the prime customer.[4]
The series production of the Eurofighter Typhoon is underway, and the aircraft is being procured under three separate contracts (referred to as "tranches"), each for aircraft with generally improved capabilities. The aircraft has entered service with the British Royal Air Force, the German Luftwaffe, the Italian Air Force, the Spanish Air Force and the Austrian Air Force. Saudi Arabia has signed a £4.43 billion (approx. €6.4 billion c. 2007) contract for 72 aircraft.[5]




Specifications (Typhoon)
Data from Typhoon performance data,[138] RAF Typhoon,[139] BAE Systems page,[140] AFM[141]
General characteristics
• Crew: 1 (operational aircraft) or 2 (training aircraft)
• Length: 15.96 m (52 ft 5 in)
• Wingspan: 10.95 m (35 ft 11 in)
• Height: 5.28 m (17 ft 4 in)
• Wing area: 50 m² (538 ft²)
• Empty weight: 11,000 kg (24,250 lb)
• Loaded weight: 15,550 kg (34,280 lb)
• Max takeoff weight: 23,500 kg (51,800 lb)
• Powerplant: 2× Eurojet EJ200 afterburning turbofan
o Dry thrust: 60 kN (13,500 lbf) each
o Thrust with afterburner: 90 kN (20,000 lbf) each
Performance
• Maximum speed:
o At altitude: Mach 2+ (2,495 km/h, 1550 mph)[142][143]
o At sea level: Mach 1.2
o Supercruise: Mach 1.1[141]-1.5[144]
• Range: 2,900 km (1,840 mi)
• Combat radius:
o Ground attack, lo-lo-lo : 601 km;
o Ground attack, hi-lo-hi : 1389 km;
o Air defence with 3hr CAP : 185 km;
o Air defence with 10-min loiter : 1389 km [145] (373 mi, 863 mi, 115 mi, 863 mi)
• Ferry range: 3,790 km (2,300 mi)
• Service ceiling: 19,812 m (65,000 ft)
• Rate of climb: >315 m/s[146][147] (62,000 ft/min[148])
• Wing loading: 311 kg/m² (63.7 lb/ft²)
• Thrust/weight: 1.16
Armament
• Gun: 1x 27 mm Mauser BK-27 cannon 150 rounds
• 13 weapons hard points look below
viewtopic.php?f=9&t=102849
• Air-to-Air missiles: AIM-9 Sidewinder, AIM-132 ASRAAM, AIM-120 AMRAAM, IRIS-T and in the future MBDA Meteor
• Air-to-Ground missiles: AGM-84 Harpoon, AGM-88 HARM, ALARM, Storm Shadow (AKA "Scalp EG"), Brimstone, Taurus KEPD 350, Penguin and in the future AGM Armiger
• Bombs: Paveway 2, Paveway 3, Enhanced Paveway, JDAM, HOPE/HOSBO
• Laser designator, e.g. LITENING pod
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... 10_arp.jpg


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/e ... rators.png

_________________
let your YES be YES and your NO be NO but plz no maybe


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Unread postPosted: Fri Jun 12, 2009 8:04 pm
  

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Knight

Joined: Mon Jul 14, 2008 5:02 pm
Posts: 4008
Location: new york
Comment: NEVER QUIT..... I got lucky
Sukhoi Su-30MKI


The Sukhoi Su-30 MKI[1] (NATO reporting name Flanker-H) is a variant of the Sukhoi Su-30 jointly-developed by Russia's Sukhoi Corporation and India's Hindustan Aeronautics Limited (HAL) for the Indian Air Force (IAF). It is an air superiority fighter which can also act as a multirole, strike fighter jet.
The development of the variant started after India signed a deal with Russia in 2000 to manufacture 140 Su-30 fighter jets.[2] The first Russian-made Su-30MKI variant was integrated into the IAF in 2002,[3] while the first indigenous Su-30MKI entered service with the IAF in 2004.[4] In 2007, the IAF ordered 40 additional MKIs.[5]
Capable of carrying nuclear weapons and tailor-made for Indian specifications, the fighter jet integrates Indian systems and avionics.[6] It also contains French and Israeli subsystems.[7] The MKI variant features several improvements over the basic K and MK variants and is classified as a 4.5 generation fighter.[8][9] Due to similar features and components, the MKI variant is often considered to be a customized Indian variant of the Sukhoi Su-35.[10][11]


General characteristics
• Crew: 2
• Length: 21.935 m (72.97 ft)
• Wingspan: 14.7 m (48.2 ft)
• Height: 6.36 m (20.85 ft)
• Wing area: 62.0 m² (667 ft²)
• Empty weight: 17,700 kg (39,300 lb)
• Loaded weight: 24,900 kg (54,895 lb)
• Max takeoff weight: 38,800 kg (85,600 lb)
• Powerplant: 2× Lyulka AL-31FP turbofans with thrust vectoring, 131 kN (29,449 lbf) each
Performance
• Maximum speed: Mach 2.35 (2,500 km/h) at 11,000 m (36,000 ft)
• Range: 5,000 km (2,700 nmi) at altitude; (1,270 km, 690 nmi near ground level)(With Internal Fuel Tank)
• Service ceiling: 17,300 m (56,800 ft)
• Rate of climb: >304 m/s (70,000 ft/min)
• Wing loading: 401 kg/m² (98 lb/ft²)
• Thrust/weight: 1.07 (at loaded weight)
Armament: Air to Air Missiles: hard pints x10 viewtopic.php?f=9&t=102849
• 6 × R-27R/AA-10A/Astra[37] semi-active radar homing medium range AAM of range 80 km.
• 6 × R-27T (AA-10B) infrared homing seeker, medium range AAM, 70 km
• 2 × R-27P (AA-10C) passive radar seeker, long range AAM
• 10 × R-77 (AA-12) active radar homing medium range AAM, 100 km
• 6 × R-73 (AA-11) short range AAM, 30 km
Air to Surface Missiles:
• 2 × Kh-59ME TV guided standoff Missile, 115 km
• 2 × Kh-59MK Laser guided standoff Missile, 130 km
• 4 × Kh-35 Anti-Ship Missile, 130 km
• 3 × PJ-10 Brahmos Supersonic Cruise Missile,300 km
• 6 × Kh-31P/A anti-radar missile, 70 km
• 6 × Kh-29T/L laser guided missile, 30 km
• 4 × S-8 rocket pods (80 unguided rockets)
• 4 × S-13 rocket pods (20 unguided rockets)
Bombs:
• 6 × KAB-500L laser guided bombs
• 3 × KAB-1500L laser guided bombs
• 8 × FAB-500T dumb bombs
• 28 × OFAB-250-270 dumb bombs
• 32 × OFAB-100-120 dumb bombs
• 8 × RBK-500 cluster bombs
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... ukhoi3.JPG

















Mikoyan MiG-29M



The Mikoyan MiG-29M (Russian: Микоян МиГ-35, NATO reporting name "Fulcrum-E") is a mature development of the MiG-29M/M2 and MiG-29K/KUB technology. Formerly known as the "MiG-33", it was developed from the Mikoyan MiG-29 (NATO: "Fulcrum") fighter jet during mid-1980s. The MiG-29M is sometimes called the Super Fulcrum.

Specifications (MiG-29M/M2)
Data from MiG-29M data, [8] Warfare.ru,[9] Global Security[10]
General characteristics
• Crew: 1 or 2
• Length: 17.37 m (57 ft)
• Wingspan: 11.4 m (37 ft 3 in)
• Height: 4.73 m (15 ft 6 in)
• Wing area: 38 m² (409 ft²)
• Max takeoff weight: 22,400 kg (49,383.54 lb)
• Powerplant: 2× Klimov RD-33MK afterburning turbofans, 9,000 kgf (88.26 kN, 19,840 lbf) each
Performance
• Maximum speed:
o High altitude: Mach 2.25 (2,400 km/h, 1,491 mph)[9]
o Low altitude: Mach 1.4 (1,500 km/h, 932 mph)
• Ferry range: 2,000 km, 1,800 km (twin seat) (1,243 mi, 1,118 mi (twin seat))
• Service ceiling: 18,000 m[9] (59,000 ft)
• Rate of climb: 330 m/s[9] (65,000 ft/min)
• Wing loading: 442 kg/m² (90.5 lb/ft²)
• Thrust/weight: 1.13
Armament total 8 hard points viewtopic.php?f=9&t=102849
• 1 × 30 mm GSh-30-1 cannon with 150 rounds
• A-A missiles: 8 × R-73E, 6 × RVV-AE
• A-S missiles: 4 × Kh-29T(TE), 4 × Kh-31A, 4 × Kh-31P, Kh-35E
• Guided bombs: 4 × KAB-500Kr
Avionics
• Phazotron Zhuk-ME radar


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... 7_8_93.jpg

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Unread postPosted: Fri Jun 12, 2009 8:05 pm
  

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Knight

Joined: Mon Jul 14, 2008 5:02 pm
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Comment: NEVER QUIT..... I got lucky
JAS 39 Gripen


The Saab JAS 39 Gripen (English: Griffin) is a fighter aircraft manufactured by the Swedish aerospace company Saab. Gripen International acts as a prime contracting organisation and is responsible for marketing, selling and supporting the Gripen fighter around the world.
The aircraft is in service with the Swedish Air Force, the Czech Air Force, the Hungarian Air Force and the South African Air Force, and has been ordered by the Royal Thai Air Force. A total of 236 Gripens have been ordered as of 2008.[5]


Specifications (JAS 39)
General characteristics
• Crew: 1 (2 for JAS 39B/D)
• Length: 14.1 m (46 ft 3 in)
• Wingspan: 8.4 m (27 ft 7 in)
• Height: 4.5 m (14 ft 9 in)
• Wing area: 30.0 m² (323 ft²)
• Empty weight: 5,700 kg (14,600 lb)
• Loaded weight: 8,500 kg (18,700 lb)
• Max takeoff weight: 14,000 kg (31,000 lb)
• Powerplant: 1× Volvo Aero RM12 afterburning turbofan
o Dry thrust: 54 kN (12,100 lbf)
o Thrust with afterburner: 80.5 kN (18,100 lbf)
• Wheel track: 2.4 m (7 ft 10 in)
• Length (two-seater): 14.8 m (48 ft 5 in)
Performance
• Maximum speed: Mach 2 (2,130 km/h, 1,320 mph)
• Combat radius: 800 km (500 mi, 432 nmi)
• Ferry range: 3,200 km (2,000 mi) with drop tanks
• Service ceiling: 15,240 m (50,000 ft)
• Wing loading: 336 kg/m² (68.8 lb/ft²)
• Thrust/weight: 0.97
Armament total 8 hard points viewtopic.php?f=9&t=102849
• 1 × 27 mm Mauser BK-27 cannon 120 rounds
• 6 × Rb.74 (AIM-9) or Rb 98 (IRIS-T)
• 6 × Rb.99 (AIM-120) or MICA
• 4 x Rb.71 (Skyflash) or Meteor
• 4 x Rb.75
• 2 x KEPD.350
• 4 x GBU-12 Paveway II laser-guided bomb
• 4 x rocket pods 13.5 cm rockets
• 2 x Rbs.15F anti-ship missile
• 2 x Bk.90 cluster bomb
• 8 x Mark 82 bombs
• 1 x ALQ-TLS ECM pod



http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... anding.jpg





Dassault Rafale


The Dassault Rafale (English: Squall)[3] is a French twin-engined delta-wing highly agile multi-role fighter aircraft designed and built by Dassault Aviation. The Rafale is being produced both for land-based use with the French Air Force and for carrier-based naval operations with the French Navy. It has also been marketed for export. While several countries have expressed interest in the Rafale, there have been no foreign sales as yet( but the AUL has many in the pacific islands getting ready to set some series dames to protect AUL military bases )


Specifications
General characteristics
• Crew: 1–2
• Length: 15.27 m (50.1 ft)
• Wingspan: 10.80 m (35.4 ft)
• Height: 5.34 m (17.5 ft)
• Wing area: 45.7 m² (492 ft²)
• Empty weight: 9,500 kg (C), 9,770 kg (B),[47] 10,196 kg (M) ()
• Max takeoff weight: 24,500 kg (C/D), 22,200 kg (M)[48] (54,000 lb)
• Powerplant: 2× Snecma M88-2 turbofans
o Dry thrust: 50.04 kN (11,250 lbf) each
o Thrust with afterburner: 75.62 kN with M88-Eco >90 kN after 2010 (17,000 lbf) each
Performance
• Maximum speed:
o High altitude: Mach 2 (1,290 knots)[49]
o Low altitude: 1,390 km/h, 750 knots
• Combat radius: 1,852+ km (1,000+ nmi) on penetration mission
• Service ceiling: 16,800 m (55,000 ft)
• Rate of climb: 304.8+ m/s (1,000+ ft/s)
• Wing loading: 326 kg/m² (83 1/3 lb/ft²)
• Thrust/weight: 1.13
Armament total 8 hard points viewtopic.php?f=9&t=102849
• Guns: 1× 30 mm (1.18 in) GIAT 30/719B cannon with 125 rounds
• Missiles:
o Air-to-air:
 MICA IR/EM or
 Magic II and in the future
 MBDA Meteor
o Air-to-ground:
 MBDA Apache or
 SCALP EG or
 AASM or
 GBU-12 Paveway II or
 AM 39 Exocet or
 ASMP-A nuclear missile
Avionics
• Thales RBE2 radar
• Thales SPECTRA electronic warfare system.
• Thales/SAGEM OSF (Optronique Secteur Frontal) infrared search and track system.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... ec-1-7.jpg

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Unread postPosted: Fri Jun 12, 2009 8:06 pm
  

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Comment: NEVER QUIT..... I got lucky
HAL Tejas


The HAL Tejas (IPA: /t̪eʒəs/ Sanskrit: तेजस् (help•info): "Radiant") is a lightweight multirole jet fighter being developed by India. It is a tailless,[3] compound delta wing design powered by a single engine. Originally known as the Light Combat Aircraft (LCA)—a designation which continues in popular usage—the aircraft was officially named "Tejas"[4] by then Prime Minister Atal Bihari Vajpayee on 4 May 2003.[5]
The limited series production of the Tejas commenced in 2007. A two-seat trainer variant is also in development (exited the production line as of November 2008), as is a naval variant capable of operating from the Indian Navy's aircraft carriers. The IAF is reported to have a requirement for 200 single-seat and 20 two-seat conversion trainers, while the Indian Navy may order up to 40 single-seaters to replace its Sea Harrier FRS.51 and Harrier T.60.[6] The LCA naval variant is expected to take to the skies by 2009.[7] Recent developments suggest that the aircraft will be inducted into the Indian Air Force by end of 2010 or early 2011.[


General characteristics
• Crew: 1
• Length: 13.20 m (43 ft 4 in)
• Wingspan: 8.20 m (26 ft 11 in)
• Height: 4.40 m (14 ft 9 in)
• Wing area: 38.4 m² (413 ft²)
• Empty weight: 6,500 kg (14,100 lb)
• Loaded weight: 9,500 kg (20,700 lb (in fighter configuration))
• Max takeoff weight: 14,500 kg (27,000 lb)
• Powerplant: 1× General Electric F404-GE-IN20 turbofan
o Dry thrust: 53.9 kN (11,250 lbf)
o Thrust with afterburner: 85 kN (18,000 lbf)
• Internal fuel capacity: 3000 liters
• External fuel capacity: 5×800 liter tanks or 3×1,200 liter tanks, totaling 4,000/3,600 liters
Performance
• Maximum speed: Mach 2.0 (2,376+ km/h at high altitude) at 15,000 m
• Range: 3000 km (1,840 mi (without refueling))
• Service ceiling: 15,950+ m (54,000 ft (engine re-igniter safely capable))
• Wing loading: 221.4 kg/m² (45.35 lb/ft²)
• Thrust/weight: 1.02
• g limits : +8.5 g / 9g
Armament
• Guns: 1× mounted 23 mm twin-barrel GSh-23 cannon with 220 rounds of ammunition.
• Hardpoints: 8 total: 1× beneath the port-side intake trunk, 6× under-wing, and 1× under-fuselage with a capacity of >4000 kg external fuel and ordnance, viewtopic.php?f=9&t=102849
• Missiles:
• air-to-air missiles:
o Astra BVRAAM
o Vympel R-77 (NATO reporting name: AA-12 Adder)
o Vympel R-73 (NATO reporting name: AA-11 Archer)
• Air-to-surface missiles:
o Kh-59ME TV guided standoff Missile
o Kh-59MK Laser guided standoff Missile
o Anti-ship missile
o Kh-35
o Kh-31
• Bombs:
• KAB-1500L laser guided bombs
• FAB-500T dumb bombs
• OFAB-250-270 dumb bombs
• OFAB-100-120 dumb bombs
• RBK-500 cluster bombs
Avionics
EL/M-2052 AESA radar


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... view_b.gif




Kamov Ka-50



The Kamov Ka-50 Black Shark (NATO reporting name: "Hokum A") is a single-seat Russian attack helicopter with the distinctive coaxial rotor system of the Kamov design bureau. It was designed in the 1980s and adopted for service in the Russian army in 1995. It is currently manufactured by the Progress company of Arseniev.
During the late 1990s, Kamov and Israeli Air Industries developed a tandem-seat cockpit version, the Kamov Ka-50-2 Erdogan, to compete in Turkey's attack helicopter competition. Kamov also designed another two-seat variant, the Kamov Ka-52 Alligator (NATO reporting name: "Hokum B").[3]


General characteristics
• Crew: One (for Ka-52: two)
• Length: 13.50 m (44 ft 3 in)
• Rotor diameter: 2x 14.50 m (2x 47 ft 7 in)
• Height: 5.4 m (17 ft 9 in)
• Disc area: 330.3 m² (3,555 ft²)
• Empty weight: 7,800 kg (17,200 lb)
• Loaded weight: 9,800 kg (21,600 lb)
• Max takeoff weight: 10,800 kg (23,810 lb)
• Powerplant: 2× Klimov TV3-117VK turboshafts, 1,660 kW (2,226 shp) each
• For Ka-52:
o Loaded weight: 10,400 kg (22,930 lb)
Performance
• Maximum speed: 390 km/h (204 knots, 242 mph) in dive
• Cruise speed: 270 km/h (146 knots, 168 mph)
• Range: 1,160 km (720 miles)
• Combat radius: 460 km ()
• Service ceiling: 5,500 m (18,000 ft)
• Rate of climb: 10 m/s (1,970 ft/min)
• Disc loading: 30 kg/m² (6 lb/ft²)
• Power/mass: 0.33 kW/kg (0.20 hp/lb)
Armament
• 1x mobile semi-rigid 30 mm Shipunov 2A42 cannon (240 rounds, dual feeding AP or HE-Frag)
• A variety of payloads on the four wing hard points, viewtopic.php?f=9&t=102849
• including UPK-23-250 23-mm gun pods (240 rounds each), APU-6 9K121 Vikhr anti-tank missile racks, Vympel R-73 (NATO: AA-11 Archer) air-to-air missiles, S-8 rocket 80 mm and S-13 rocket 122 mm rocket pods, Kh-25 semi-active laser guided tactical air-to-ground missiles, presumably S-25/S-25L high caliber rockets, 4x 250 kg (550 lb) bombs or 2x500kg (1,100 lb) bombs, 500 L (130 US gal) external fuel tanks. Reportedly, twin Igla light air-to-air missile launchers under each wingtip countermeasure pod (total 4 missiles). Maximum total payload 2,000 kg.
• Two pods on the wingtips with flare and chaff countermeasure dispensers, 64 cartridges each (total 12

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... 7_8_93.jpg

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... raphic.gif





Mil Mi-24



he Mil Mi-24 (Cyrillic Миль Ми-24, NATO reporting name "Hind") is a large helicopter gunship and low-capacity troop transport produced by Mil Moscow Helicopter Plant and operated from 1972 by the Soviet Air Force, its successors, and over thirty other nations. In October 2007, the Russian Air Force announced it would replace its 250 Mi-24 helicopter gunships with 300 more modern Mi-28s and possibly Ka-50s by 2015.[1][2]
In NATO circles the export versions, Mi-25 and Mi-35, are simply denoted with a letter suffix as "Hind D" and "Hind E" respectively. Soviet pilots called the aircraft летающий танк (letayushchiy tank, “flying tank”). More common unofficial nicknames were Крокодил (Krokodil, “Crocodile”), due to the helicopter's new camouflage scheme [3] and Стакан (Stakan, “Glass”), because of the flat glass plates which surrounded the three place cockpit of the Mi-24.
General characteristics
• Crew: 2-3 (pilot,weapons system officer and technician (optional)),
• Capacity: 8 troops or 4 stretchers
• Length: 17.5 m (57 ft 4 in)
• Rotor diameter: 17.3 m (56 ft 7 in)
• Wingspan: 6.5 m (21 ft 3 in)
• Height: 6.5 m (21 ft 3 in)
• Disc area: 235 m² (2,530 ft²)
• Empty weight: 8,500 kg (18,740 lb)
• Max takeoff weight: 12,000 kg (26,500 lb)
• Powerplant: 2× Isotov TV3-117 turbines, 1,600 kW (2,200 hp) each
Performance
• Maximum speed: 335 km/h (208 mph)
• Range: 450 km (280 miles)
• Service ceiling: 4,500 m (14,750 ft)
• flexible 12.7 mm Yakushev-Borzov Yak-B Gatling gun on most variants. Maximum of 1,470 rounds of ammunition.
• fixed twin-barrel GSh-30K on the Mi-24P. 750 rounds of ammunition.
• flexible twin-barrel GSh-23L on the Mi-24VP and Mi-24VM. 450 rounds of ammunition.
• PKT door mounted machine guns
External stores
• Total payload is 1,500 kg of external stores.
• Inner hardpoints can carry at least 500 kg
• Outer hardpoints can carry up to 250 kg
• Wing-tip pylons can only carry the 9M17 Phalanga (in the Mi-24A-D) or the 9K114 Shturm complex (in the Mi-24V-F).
Bomb-load
• Bombs within weight range (presumably ZAB, FAB, RBK, ODAB etc.), Up to 500 kg.
• MBD multiple ejector racks (presumably MBD-4 with 4xFAB-100)
• KGMU2V submunition/mine dispenser pods
First-generation armament (standard production Mi-24D)
• GUV-8700 gunpod (with a 12.7 mm Yak-B + 2x7.62 mm GShG-7.62 mm combination or one 30 mm AGS-17)
• UB-32 S-5 rocket launchers
• S-24 240 mm rocket
• 9M17 Phalanga (a pair on each wingtip pylon)
Second-generation armament (Mi-24V, Mi-24P and most upgraded Mi-24D)
• UPK-23-250 gunpod carrying the GSh-23L
• B-8V20 a lightweight long tubed helicopter version of the S-8 rocket launcher
• 9K114 Shturm in pairs on the outer and wingtip pylons


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... Mi24CP.jpg

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... _Mi-24.png




Mil Mi-28


The Mil Mi-28 (NATO reporting name 'Havoc') is a Russian all-weather day-night military tandem two-seat anti-armour attack helicopter. It is a dedicated attack helicopter with no intended secondary transport capability, better optimized than the Mil Mi-24 for the anti-tank role. It carries a single gun in an undernose barbette, plus external loads carried on pylons beneath stub wings.

Mi-28A, 1987

General characteristics
• Crew: 1 pilot (rear), 1 navigator/weapons operator (front)
• Length: 17.01 m (55 ft 9 in)
• Rotor diameter: 17.20 m (56 ft 5 in)
• Height: 3.82 m (12 ft 7 in)
• Empty weight: 8,095 kg (17,845 lb)
• Loaded weight: 10,400 kg (22,930 lb)
• Max takeoff weight: 11,500 kg (25,705 lb)
• Powerplant: 2× Klimov TV3-117VMA turboshaft, 1,450 kW (1,950 hp) each
Performance
• Maximum speed: 300 km/h (187 mph)
• Range: 1,100 km (640 mi)
• Service ceiling: 5,800 m (19,000 ft)
Armament
• 1x chin-mounted 30 mm Shipunov 2A42 cannon with 300 rounds (220° horizontal fire)
• up to 2,300 kg of disposable stores on four hard points viewtopic.php?f=9&t=102849 , including bombs, rockets, missiles, and gunpods
Mi-28N
General characteristics
• Crew: two, pilot and weapons operator
• Length: 17.01 m (55 ft 10 in)
• Main rotor diameter: 17.20 m (56 ft 5 in)
• Height: 3.82 m (12 ft 6 in) (without radar)
• Main rotor area: 232.4 m² (2,500 ft²)
• Empty: 7,890 kg (17,394 lb)
• Loaded: 10,400 kg (22,930 lb)
• Maximum takeoff: 12,100 kg (26,700 lb)
• Powerplant: 2x Klimov TV3-117VM turboshafts, 1,640 kW (2,200 shp) each
Performance
• Maximum speed: 324 km/h (201 mph)
• Range: 460 km (286 miles)
• Service ceiling: 5,750 m (18,900 ft)
• Rate of climb: 816 m/min (2,680 ft/min)
• Main rotor loading: 45 kg/m² (9 lb/ft²)
• Power/Mass: 0.31 kW/kg (0.19 hp/lb)
Armament
• 1x chin-mounted 30 mm Shipunov 2A42 cannon with 300 rounds (220° horizontal fire)
• up to 2,400 kg (4,400 lb) of disposable stores on four hardpoints viewtopic.php?f=9&t=102849
• Including bombs, rockets, gunpods, anti-tank and anti-air missiles.




http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... schema.png

_________________
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Unread postPosted: Fri Jun 12, 2009 8:08 pm
  

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Knight

Joined: Mon Jul 14, 2008 5:02 pm
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Location: new york
Comment: NEVER QUIT..... I got lucky
The Agusta A129 Mangusta
The Agusta A129 Mangusta (Mongoose) (AW129 from June 2007) is an attack helicopter manufactured by Agusta (part of AgustaWestland) of Italy. It is the first attack helicopter to be designed and produced wholly in Western Europe. The TAI T-129 is a developed version of the AW129, and is now the responsibility of Turkish Aerospace Industries (TAI).

General characteristics
• Crew: 2: pilot and weapon systems officer
• Length: 12.28 m (40 ft 3 in)
• Rotor diameter: 11.90 m (39 ft 1 in)
• Height: 3.35 m (11 ft 0 in)
• Disc area: 444.9 m² (4,789 ft²)
• Empty weight: 2,530 kg (5,575 lb)
• Max takeoff weight: 4,600 kg (10,140 lb)
• Powerplant: 2× Rolls-Royce Gem 2-1004D (license built by Piaggio) turboshafts, 664 kW (890 shp) each
• Propellers: four blade rotor
Performance
• Maximum speed: 278 km/h (148 knots, 170 mph)
• Cruise speed: 229 km/h (135 knots, 155 mph)
• Range: 510 km (275 nm, 320 mi)
• Ferry range: 1,000 km (540 nm, 620 mi)
• Service ceiling: 4,725 m (15,500 ft)
• Rate of climb: 10.2 m/s (2,025 ft/min)
Armament
• Guns: 1× 20 mm (0.787 in) three-barrel gatling-type cannon (500 rounds) (only CBT version)
• Rockets: 4 pods with
o 38× 81 mm (3.19 in) unguided rockets or
o 76× 70 mm (2.75 in) unguided rockets or
o 12.7 mm machine gun-pod
• Missiles: total 8 hard points
o 8× AGM-114 Hellfire or BGM-71 TOW anti-tank missiles
viewtopic.php?f=9&t=102849
o 4-8× AIM-92 Stinger or Mistral anti-aircraft missiles


AH-64 Apache


The AH-64 Apache is a four-blade, twin-engine attack helicopter with reverse-tricycle landing gear, and tandem cockpit for a crew of two. The Apache was developed as Model 77 by Hughes Helicopters for the United States Army's Advanced Attack Helicopter program to replace the AH-1 Cobra. First flown on 1 October 1975, the AH-64 features a nose-mounted sensor suite for target acquisition and night vision systems. The Apache is armed with a 30 mm M230 Chain Gun carried between the main landing gear, under the aircraft's belly. The AH-64 also carries a mixture of AGM-114 Hellfire and Hydra 70 rocket pods on four hardpoints mounted on stub-wing pylons. The AH-64 also features double- and triple-redundant aircraft systems to improve survivability for the aircraft and crew in combat, as well as improved crash survivability for the pilots.
The Army selected the AH-64 over the Bell YAH-63 in 1976, awarding Hughes Helicopters a pre-production contract for two more aircraft. In 1982, the Army approved full production. McDonnell Douglas continued production and development, after purchasing Hughes Helicopters from Summa Corporation in 1984. On 15 April 1992, the first AH-64D Apache Longbow prototype was flown, and the first production aircraft was delivered to the Army in the spring of 1997. In August 1997, Boeing and McDonnell Douglas merged to become The Boeing Company. Today, AH-64 production is continued by the Boeing Integrated Defense Systems division.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... ongbow.jpg

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... _AH-64.png

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... APACHE.png

General characteristics
• Crew: 2: pilot, CPG (co-pilot/gunner)
• Length: 58.17 ft (17.73 m) (with both rotors turning)
• Rotor diameter: 48 ft 0 in (14.63 m)
• Height: 12.7 ft (3.87 m)
• Disc area: 1,809.5 ft² (168.11 m²)
• Empty weight: 11,387 lb (5,165 kg)
• Loaded weight: 17,650 lb (8,000 kg)
• Max takeoff weight: 23,000 lb (10,433 kg)
• Powerplant: 2× General Electric T700-GE-701 and later upgraded to T700-GE-701C (1990-present) & T700-GE-701D (AH-64D block III) turboshafts, -701: 1,690 shp, -701C: 1,890 shp, -701D: 2,000 shp (-701: 1,260 kW, -701C: 1,490 kW, -701D: 1,490 kW) each
• Fuselage length: 49 ft 5 in (15.06 m)
• Rotor systems: 4 blade main rotor, 4 blade tail rotor in non-orthogonal alignment[45]


Performance
• Never exceed speed: 197 knots (227 mph, 365 km/h)
• Maximum speed: 158 knots (182 mph, 293 km/h)
• Cruise speed: 143 knots (165 mph, 265 km/h)
• Combat radius: 260 nmi (300 mi, 480 km)
• Ferry range: 1,024 nmi (1,180 mi, 1,900 km)
• Service ceiling: 21,000 ft (6,400 m)
• Rate of climb: 2,500 ft/min (12.7 m/s)
• Disc loading: 9.80 lb/ft² (47.90 kg/m²)
• Power/mass: 0.18 hp/lb (310 W/kg)
Armament
• Guns: 1× 30x113 mm (1.18x4.45 in) M230 cannon, 1,200 rounds
• Rockets: Hydra 70 FFAR rockets
• Missiles: combination of AGM-114 Hellfire, AIM-92 Stinger, and AIM-9 Sidewinder
viewtopic.php?f=9&t=102849
• total 6 hard points



Eurocopter Tiger
The Eurocopter Tiger (company designation EC 665) is an attack helicopter manufactured by Eurocopter. In Germany it is known as the Tiger; in France and Spain it is called the Tigre.
Specifications (Eurocopter Tiger)
General characteristics
• Crew: 2 (pilot, weapon systems officer)
• Length: 14.08 m fuselage (46 ft 2 in)
• Rotor diameter: 13.00 m (42 ft 8 in)
• Height: 3.83 m (12 ft 7 in)
• Disc area: 133 m² (1,430 ft²)
• Empty weight: 3,060 kg (6,750 lb)
• Max takeoff weight: 6,000 kg (13,000 lb)
• Internal fuel capacity: 1,080 kg (2,380 lb)
• Powerplant: 2× Rolls-Royce/Turbomeca/MTU MTR390 turboshafts, 873 kW (1,170 shp) each
Performance
• Maximum speed: 290 km/h with mast, 315 km/h without mast (157 knots, 181 mph with mast, 170 knots or 196 mph without mast)
• Range: 800 km (430 nm, 500 mi) combat (with external tanks in the inboard stations: 1300km)
• Service ceiling: 4,000 m (13,000 ft)
• Rate of climb: 10.7 m/s (2,105 ft/min)
Armament
• Guns:
o 1× 30 mm (1.18 in) GIAT 30 cannon in chin turret (HAP, HAD, ARH)
On its two inner hardpoints and two outer hardpoints the Eurocopter Tiger can carry a combination of the following weapons:
UHT:
• on each of its two inner hardpoints: viewtopic.php?f=9&t=102849
o 1× 12.7 mm (0.50 in) machine gun in a pod, or
o 4× PARS 3 LR anti-tank missiles, or
o 4× HOT3 anti-tank guided missiles, or
o 19× 70 mm (2.76 in) Hydra unguided missiles in a pod
• on each of its two outer hardpoints:
o 2× AIM-92 Stinger air-to-air missiles
HAP:
• on each of its two inner hardpoints: viewtopic.php?f=9&t=102849
o 2x 20 mm (0.787 in) machine cannons in a pod, or
o 22× 68 mm (2.68 in) SNEB unguided missiles in a pod
• on each of its two outer hardpoints: viewtopic.php?f=9&t=102849
o 2× Mistral air-to-air missiles, or
o 12× 68 mm (2.68 in) SNEB unguided missiles in a pod
HAD:
• on each of its two inner hardpoints: viewtopic.php?f=9&t=102849
o 4× Rafael Spike-ER anti-tank guided missiles (Spanish HAD), or
o 4× AGM-114 Hellfire anti-tank guided missiles (French HAD), or
o 19× 70 mm (2.76 in) SNEB unguided missiles in a pod
• on each of its two outer hardpoints:
o 2× Mistral air-to-air missiles, or
o 7× 70 mm (2.76 in) SNEB unguided missiles in a pod
ARH:
• on each of its two inner hardpoints: viewtopic.php?f=9&t=102849
o 4× AGM-114 Hellfire anti-tank guided missiles (ARH), or
o 19× 70 mm Hydra unguided missiles in a pod
• on each of its two outer hardpoints:
o 2× AIM-92 Stinger air-to-air missiles
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... 230203.jpg
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... _Tiger.gif
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... rators.jpg



Denel AH-2 Rooivalk
The Denel AH-2 Rooivalk (previously designated CSH-2) is an attack helicopter manufactured by Denel Aerospace Systems of South Africa. Rooivalk is Afrikaans for "Red Kestrel".[2]
The South African Air Force (SAAF) has ordered 12 Rooivalk AH-2As, the first of which entered service in July 1999. The helicopters are flown by 16 Squadron, which is based at AFB Bloemspruit near Bloemfontein.
Specifications
General characteristics
• Crew: 2 (pilot & weapon systems officer)
• Length: 18.73 m, 61ft 5in (main rotor to tail rotor); 16.39 m fuselage ()
• Rotor diameter: 15.58 m (51ft)
• Height: 5.19 m (17ft)
• Empty weight: 5,190 kg (11,441 lb)
• Max takeoff weight: 8,750 kg (19,290 lb)
• Internal fuel capacity: 1,469 kg, (3,238 lb)
• Powerplant: 2× Turbomeca Makila 1K2 turboshafts, 1,492 kW (sea-level ISA) (2,001 shp) each
Performance
• Maximum speed: 309 km/h (193 mph)
• Range: 700 km combat; 1,130 km ferry (440 mi / 700 mi)
• Service ceiling: 6,000 m (20,000 ft)
• Rate of climb: 13.3 m/s (2,105 ft/min)
• Disc loading: lb/ft² (kg/m²)
• Power/mass: hp/lb (kW/kg)
Armament
• 1 x F2 20 mm cannon, 700 rounds
• total 8 hard points or 16 x Mokopa ZT-6 long-range anti-tank guided missiles (ATGM)
viewtopic.php?f=9&t=102849
• 4 x MBDA Mistral air-to-air missiles,
• 36 or 72 x 70 mm folding fin aerial rockets (FFAR)
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... g_2006.jpg




CAIC WZ-10
The WZ-10 (WZ, 武直 = Wuzhuang Zhishengji, 武装直升机) is an attack helicopter developed by the People's Republic of China. It is designed primarily for anti-tank missions, but is believed to have a secondary air-to-air capability as well. It is being built by Changhe Aircraft Industries Corporation (CAIC).
Operators
People's Republic of China
• People's Liberation Army
Specifications (estimated)
General characteristics
• Crew: 2
• Length: 14.15 m (ft)
• Rotor diameter: 13.0 m [4] (ft)
• Height: 3.85 m (ft)
• Disc area: m² (ft²)
• Empty weight: 5540 kg [4] (lb)
• Loaded weight: kg (lb)
• Useful load: 1500 kg [4] (lb)
• Max takeoff weight: 7000 kg (lb)
• Powerplant: 2× WZ-9 turboshafts [4], 957 kw (1285 hp) each
Performance
• Maximum speed: 300+ km/h [4]
• Cruise speed: 270+ km/h [4]
• Ferry range: 800+ km [4] ()
• Service ceiling: 6400 m (ft)
• Rate of climb: over 11+ m/s [4] (ft/min)
• Disc loading: kg/m² (lb/ft²)
• Maximum acceleration: +3 g (29 m/s²)
Armament
• Guns: 23 mm or 30 mm autocannon mounted on chin turret
• Hardpoints: 4 viewtopic.php?f=9&t=102849
• Rockets: 57 mm, 90 mm multi-barrel unguided rocket pods
• Air-to-surface missiles: Up to 8 ATGM
• Air-to-air missiles:
o Up to 8 TY-90
o Up to 4 PL-5, PL-7, PL-9
Avionics
• YH millimetre-wave fire-control radar
• YH-96 electronic warfare suite

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... copter.png



UH-60 Black Hawk


The UH-60 Black Hawk is a four-bladed, twin-engine, medium-lift utility helicopter manufactured by Sikorsky Aircraft. Sikorsky submitted the S-70 design for the United States Army's Utility Tactical Transport Aircraft System (UTTAS) competition in 1972. The Army designated the prototype as the YUH-60A and selected the Black Hawk as the winner of the program in 1976, after a fly-off competition with the Boeing Vertol YUH-61. The UH-60A entered service with the Army in 1979, to replace the UH-1 Iroquois as the Army's tactical transport helicopter.


Specifications (UH-60L)
General characteristics
• Crew: 2 pilots (flight crew)
• Capacity: 2,640 lb of cargo internally, including 14 troops or 6 stretchers, or 8,000 lb (UH-60A) or 9,000 lb (UH-60L) of cargo externally
• Length: 64 ft 10 in (19.76 m)
• Fuselage width: 7 ft 9 in (2.36 m)
• Rotor diameter: 53 ft 8 in (16.36 m)
• Height: 16 ft 10 in (5.13 m)
• Disc area: 2,260 ft² (210 m²)
• Empty weight: 10,624 lb (4,819 kg)
• Loaded weight: 22,000 lb (9,980 kg)
• Max takeoff weight: 23,500 lb (10,660 kg)
• Powerplant: 2× General Electric T700-GE-701C turboshaft, 1,890 hp (1,410 kW) each
Performance
• Never exceed speed: 193 knots (222 mph, 357 km/h)
• Maximum speed: 159 kn (183 mph, 295 km/h)
• Cruise speed: 150 kn (173 mph, 278 km/h)
• Combat radius: 368 mi (320 nmi, 592 km)
• Ferry range: 1,380 mi[32] (1,200 nmi, 2,220 km) with ESSS stub wings and external tanks[35]
• Service ceiling: 19,000 ft (5,790 m)
• Rate of climb: 700 ft/min (3.6 m/s)
• Disc loading: 7.19 lb/ft² (35.4 kg/m²)
• Power/mass: 0.192 hp/lb (158 W/kg)

Armament
• Guns:
• 2× 7.62 mm (0.30 in) M240H machine guns[36] or
• 2× 7.62 mm (0.30 in) M134 minigun[35] or
• 2× .50 in (12.7 mm) GAU-19 gatling guns[35]
• Total 6 hard points
• Can be equipped with VOLCANO minefield dispersal system.[35] See UH-60 Armament Subsystems for more information.
• ESSS stub wings can be equipped with
• 70 mm (2.75 in)) Hydra 70 rockets[35]
• AGM-114 Hellfire laser guided missiles[35]
• 7.62 mm (0.30 in), 20 mm (0.787 in), or 30 mm (1.18 in) M230 gunpods[35]



http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... k_hawk.jpg

_________________
let your YES be YES and your NO be NO but plz no maybe


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Unread postPosted: Fri Jun 12, 2009 8:11 pm
  

User avatar
Knight

Joined: Mon Jul 14, 2008 5:02 pm
Posts: 4008
Location: new york
Comment: NEVER QUIT..... I got lucky
HAL Light Combat Helicopter
The LCH is being designed to fit into an anti-infantry and anti-armour role and will be able to operate at high altitudes (16,300 feet).
HAL hopes to equip the Indian Air Force with about 65 gunships starting 2010.[1] The helicopter will be powered by the Shakti engine developed by HAL, in association with Turbomeca of France. The helicopter will be equipped with helmet-mounted targeting systems, electronic warfare systems and advanced weapons systems.
In 2006, HAL selected the M621 cannon incorporated in a Nexter THL 20 turret for the gun armament of the helicopter, operated by a helmet mounted sight.[2] HAL has completed development of the phase and it will test fly the helicopter by March 2009, a delay of three months from the initial date of December 2008.[3] Three prototypes will be built. The second version will be fitted with weaponry before its test flight. The Indian Air Force will be provided with the third prototype for user trials.[4]
The LCH will have a glass cockpit with multifunction displays, a target acquisition and designation system with FLIR, Laser rangefinder and laser designator. Weapons will be aimed with a helmet mounted sight and there will be an electronic warfare suite with radar warning receiver, laser warning receiver and a missile approach warning system. The LCH will incorporate a number of stealth features and crash-worthy landing gear for better survivability. The LCH will have a narrow fuselage, with two crew stations. Though the LCH is derived from the ‘Dhruv’ and will carry the same weapons package now being qualified on board the armed ‘Dhruv’ (that have been ordered by the Army for its projected Combat Aviation Brigade), the IAF has specified a top speed 25kph higher. The two pilots in the LCH sit one behind the other, compared to side-by-side in the Dhruv. So all the flight controls, the hydraulics and the fuel system had to be redesigned for the sleeker, heavily armoured LCH. The LCH’s many stealth features also necessitated redesigning the fuselage.
The project development cost of LCH is currently pegged at only Rs 376.67 crore since it's basically a derivative of the HAL Dhruv already being inducted into the armed forces. The first prototype's maiden flight in is planned in March 2009, according to HAL LCH should be ready for the initial operational clearance (IOC) by December 2010. With the final operational clearance (FOC) a year or so after that, the newly revised timeframes hold that the 5.5-tonne LCH should be ready for induction into IAF by 2012-2013.[5]
On the 13th of February, 2009, HAL announced that the first flight of the Light Combat Helicopter had been pushed back to August 2009, a six month delay from the original schedule.
"We have completed the design. However, there was a problem with one of the vendors who was supposed to provide the tooling for the LCH, and so we have no choice but to push the first flight to August," says Ashok Baweja, HAL's chairman.
DESIGN FEATURES: Generally as for Dhruv except for modified nose section with tandern crew seating. Four-blade hingeless main rotor with swept blade tips. Intended for anti-tank, close air support, air-to-air combat and scout roles.
STRUCTURE: Extensive use of composites to reduce radar signature.
LANDING GEAR: Non-retractable and crashworthy tricycle type.
POWER PLANT: Two 895kW Turbomeca/HAL TM333-2C2 Ardiden 1H turboshafts (Indian name Shakti) with FADEC, derated to 798kW.
ACCOMMODATION: Crew of two in tandem; ergonomic cockpit.
SYSTEMS: Four-axis autostabilisation system; anti-resonance isolation system (ARIS).
AVIONICS: Instrumentation: Dual MFDs in each cockpit. Mission: FLIR, TV and laser range-finder/designator; helmet-mounted sights. Self-defence: Radar and laser warning receivers; MAWS; chaff/flare dispenser.
ARMAMENT: Undernose 20mm cannon. Stub-wing hardpoinls for ASMs, AAMs or rocket launchers.
Total 4 hard points
viewtopic.php?f=9&t=102849


Specifications
Data from Defense Update[6]
General characteristics
• Crew: 2
• Length: 15.8 m (51ft 8in)
• Rotor diameter: 13.3 m (43 ft 6 in)
• Height: 4.7 m (15 ft 4 in)
• Disc area: 138.9 m² (1472 ft²)
• Empty weight: 2550 kg (5621 lb)
• Loaded weight: 4000 kg (8818 lb)
• Useful load: 2950 kg (6503 lb)
• Max takeoff weight: 5,500 kg (12125 lb)
• Powerplant: 2× Shakti turboshafts, 900 kW (1200 hp) each
Performance
• Never exceed speed: 330 km/h (178 knots, 207 mph)
• Maximum speed: 275 km/h (148 knots, 171 mph)
• Cruise speed: 260 km/h (140 knots, 161 mph)
• Range: 700km (297 nm, 342 mi)
• Service ceiling: 6400 m (21,300 ft)
• Rate of climb: 12 m/s (2362 ft/min)
• Disc loading: kg/m² (lb/ft²)
• Power/mass: W/kg (hp/lb)
Armament
• Guns: 20 mm gun
• Rockets: Unguided rockets
• Missiles:
o Air-to-surface missiles
o Air-to-air missiles
o Anti-radiation missiles
o Helina ATGM(8)
• Bombs:
o Iron bombs
o cluster bomb units
o grenade launcher
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... dc/Lch.jpg

_________________
let your YES be YES and your NO be NO but plz no maybe


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Unread postPosted: Fri Jun 12, 2009 8:23 pm
  

User avatar
Knight

Joined: Mon Jul 14, 2008 5:02 pm
Posts: 4008
Location: new york
Comment: NEVER QUIT..... I got lucky
People's Republic of China will be one of the involved in back stabbing the UEEF in the macross era if it were for them the and built many bases around the world many military will be lost and recover all the way to post invid era. these base of operation will have APC tank planes and military jet fighters as well ammo supplies to maintain them and lastly many hand held weapons of all types . in invd ear this will be a ital use for invid occupation and later will a problem or a blessing after invid occupation.
note GM pick locations threw out the world


NOW for the People's Republic of China
Enhancement to the J-10 airframe
This is almost a year-odl-article:
China working on 'Super-10' advanced fighter
By Henry Ivanov JDW Correspondent
Moscow
China is developing an advanced version of the Chengdu Aircraft Industrial Corporation (CAC) J-10 multirole fighter aircraft, referred to as the Super-10, with a more powerful engine, thrust-vector control, stronger airframe and passive phased-array radar, according to Russian sources.
Russian Aircraft Corporation MiG (RSK-MiG) specialists, contracted to provide technical assistance to Chinese design houses, said the enhancement to the J-10 airframe is a logical step, since the fighter was initially intended to have the compact Pratt&Whitney PW1120 engine that powered the Israeli Lavi aircraft, which served as a basis for the J-10.
However, the imposition of US export restrictions forced the decision to install the 20 per cent heavier Russian AL-31FN engine, which requires a larger intake as it needs 40 per cent more air flow.
In late 2005 China placed a USD300 million order for a second batch of AL-31FN engines; these are a derivative of the Su-27's AL-31F for single-engine aircraft, with a lower positioning of the gearbox. At first, it was believed the contract was for the same engines as in the first batch of 54 units supplied in 2001-02 and installed into development prototypes and initial production J-10s. However, AL-31FN-maker Moscow Machine Production Plant (MMPP) Salyut in December 2005 revealed the order to be for the AL-31FN M1, which is claimed to be a new AL-31FN production standard.
The company's general manager, Yuri Eliseyev, said the new engine was purposely developed for what he referred to as the "Chinese Super-10 fighter". Four such engines have been seen assembled at MMPP Salyut's Moscow production site. One of these has been demonstrated undergoing fire testing, during which its swivel nozzle was deflected up/down and sideways at full power and reheated thrust.
283 of 916 words
[End of non-subscriber extract.]

http://www.centurychina.com/plaboard/up ... per10B.jpg




China Develops Stealth Fighter - J-14
http://newsgroups.derkeiler.com/Archive ... 00050.html
http://community.travelchinaguide.com/f ... sp?i=36240

pictures
http://s686.photobucket.com/albums/vv23 ... =1_j14.jpg

http://s686.photobucket.com/albums/vv23 ... 1410mp.jpg


China is developing new 5th generation "stealth" fighter, which is
being developed under a programmed variously referred to as XXJ, J-X,
or J-XX by Western intelligence sources and is apparently designated as
J-14. Here, Coniglio details China's internal installations and full
scale development of J-14.

The first picture has recently become available of the new Chinese 5th
generation "stealth" fighter. The aircraft, which is being developed
under a programme variously referred to as as XXJ, J-X or J-XX by
Western intelligence sources (the real Chinese name is not known), is
apparently designated as J-14.

The aircraft in the above photo looks at first sight as a complete
prototype, but it actually is a very detailed full-scale engineering
mock-up. It can be speculated that, after having been used to study the
aircraft's internal installations, the mock-up has also received an
external finish for presentation purposes. Its real function at this
point, however, is probably to assist in the definition of the required
logistic support (i.e., access to the various avionics boxes and
on-board systems, ground support equipment like the various ladders and
the external power source units, air conditioning units and so on) as
well as to study the engines' removal/installation procedures.

Since some time now it has been known that the rapidly-developing
Chinese aeronautical industry is studying a new and technologically
very advanced combat aircraft, also boasting significant low signature
characteristics. This programme is a logical step in China's "Long
March" towards full independence in designing, developing and producing
combat airplanes of a technological level in line with China's status
as the "other" world superpower, on an equal footing as Russia and
eventually even the USA.

The scarce information available about this new advanced combat
aircraft indicates that two, possibly competing, study groups (both
part of the AVIC I Group of aeronautical industries) are or have been
working on the subject. One of these groups (601 Institute) originates
from Shenyang Airplane Corporation (SAC) which is in charge of the
large, twin-engine J-8 fighters in service with the PLAAF (People's
Liberation Army Air Force) as well as of licence production of the
Su-27SK under the local designation of J-11. The overall configuration
of SAC's preliminary design, apparently designated J-13, owes
significantly to the American F/A-22, being a tailed delta but with
wing and horizontal tailplanes more in line with those of the F-16. The
other study group (611 Institute) from Chengdu Airplane Corporation
(CAC), has developed the J-12, a concept which follows the less
conventional canard layout used with success in the company's J-10.

While previous information (albeit admittedly unconfirmed), gave to the
SAC concept the edge, perhaps as a result of the company's experience
in large twin-engine fighters, this seems to have since been reversed
in favour of the Chengdu design. It is however still not clear whether
the designation of J-14 is intended to suggest a successor design to
both the J-12 and the J-13, and whether the existence of the J-14
engineering mock-up (clearly based on the J-12) indicates that the type
has been selected for development, or the competition is still going on
with parallel activities underway on another such mock-up based on the
J-13.

While no data is available about the J-14, some speculation can be done
in the attempt to extrapolate the aircraft's characteristics and thus
the roles it is called to perform. The following considerations are
based on what can be seen in the photo, but also involve making some
assumptions on the basis of what is known of the Chinese armed forces'
perceived priorities in operational requirements, the domestic
industry's approach to combat aircraft design and, finally, the
well-know Chinese weaknesses in some technological fields. In addition,
the well-developed cooperation with Russian companies, particularly in
areas such as powerplant, avionics and possibly computer-based
fly-by-wire flight control systems is also taken into consideration.

General Configuration

The J-14 will surely be fitted with a fly-by-wire flight control system
and be designed for artificial stability. The Chinese should by now
have matured an adequate experience in this field through a number of
experimental programmes and application to actual in-service types.

The general configuration of the aircraft is clearly born out from
CAC's experience in developing the J-10, with its canard layout and
ventral air intake. But while the J-10 is known to be related to the
Israeli LAVI, this new and much more ambitious design rather appears to
have a definite relationship with the ill-fated Russian 5th generation
fighter studied a few years ago, the MiG 1.44 MFI and in fact it shares
a number of elements which can doubtless be traced back to the Russian
demonstrator. It is thus very probable not to say certain that an
agreement has been reached between the Russian and Chinese governments
allowing for the transfer of information and technological data as well
as consultancy services being provided by RSK MiG and Russian research
centres (arguably including the TsAGI aerodynamic research institute)
to develop the new Chinese fighter.

The J-14's planform closely matches that of the MiG 1.44, i.e. a canard
layout (the canard surface are fully movable) with mid-positioned wing
and widely separated twin-vertical surfaces canted outward, which
continue under the wing in twin ventral fins, these too being canted
outward à la J-10. While not visible in the photo, wind tunnel models
show that the 1.44 configuration has been maintained also in the booms
protruding from the wing and contributing to support the vertical
tailplanes and ventral fins. These booms probably end with radomes
covering electronic warfare antennas and possibly also a rearward
facing radar, similar to the installation experimented in the Su-37 a
few years ago. In the MiG 1.44, the portion of wing between the
fuselage/engine pods and the booms is extended rearward past the wing
trailing edge and includes a couple of moving surfaces contributing,
together with the all-moving canard surfaces, to the longitudinal
control of the airplane. It is not yet possible to assess whether this
solution, too has been maintained for the J-14.

But while the overall aerodynamic configuration of the J-14 follows
that of the MiG 1.44 demonstrator, a radical redesign has been
implemented in the pursuit of a significant reduction in the radar
cross-section value. In particular, the aircraft incorporates a
pronounced wing-body blending, which was totally lacking in the
original Russian design. Further, the air intake, while in the same
ventral position under the forward fuselage, has a completely new
shape, and by the same token the upper part of the airplane is also
completely different and shows towards the rear the protuberances of
the engine "pods" which blend with the fuselage and wing roots in a
curious reminiscence of the Northrop YF-23. Also, the front fuselage
merges down into the upper wing, blending with the separated engine bay
bulges while maintaining some relation with the "classical" Su-27
forward fuselage shape. The search for enhanced stealth performance is
also apparent in the "flattened" profile of the entire front fuselage
section (nearly identical to the Su-32), as well as in the generalised
use of serrated doors to cover the landing gear and missile bays.

On the other hand, it remains clear that a canard configuration is
hardly the ideal solution from the point of view of a reduced radar
signature. Summing up, it would thus seem safe to assume that the J-14
is a "stealth-optimised" aircraft rather than un uncompromising stealth
design à la F/A-22 or (in a different class) the F-35 JSF.

Above the raised front fuselage is located the single-seat pilot
cockpit. This is closed by a single-piece frameless bubble-type
transparent canopy which appears technological very demanding under
various aspects such as manufacturing process, adequate optical
qualities and bird-impact resistance, yet allowing through-ejection. On
the other hand, the pilot is provided with superb all-around visibility
also due to the position of the cockpit above the forward fuselage
"hump", again a reminiscence of the Su-27.

The main landing gear, with single wheels mounted on telescopic legs,
retracts outward, with the legs being accommodated in the fuselage side
blending into the wing bottom and the wheels into the wing (a similar
geometry has been selected for the F/A-22). In order to minimise the
volume of the bay occupied by the gear in the retracted position, the
telescopic main gear legs are shortened via a pulling bar acting on a
lever, similarly to what has been introduced in the Eurofighter
TYPHOON. While not clear in the photo, it is possible that the same
landing gear leg shortening design has also been selected for the nose
twin-wheel element.

Powerplant Installation

In view of the twin-engine layout of the J-14 and its estimated TO
weight in air combat configuration (some 25-28 tons with full internal
fuel, gun ammunition, 2 x SRAAM and 4 x MRAAM), its engines should give
a thrust in the range of 13-14 tons in afterburning mode, so achieving
a thrust-to-weight ratio in the order of 1:1. Now it seems difficult to
envisage a stateof-the-art Chinese engine, particularly in this thrust
class, achieving full production status by the mid of the next decade
when the J-14 could reasonably be expected to enter service. Even for
the J-10 a Russian engine has been at last preferred. It can thus be
assumed that a Russian engine has been selected for the J-14 as well,
and indeed the model which can be seen in the picture to the rear of
the right wing of the mock-up has the accessory gearbox mounted above
the engine in the traditional Russian style. If, as it is highly
probable, this engine is a member of the Saturn/Lyulka AL-31/41 family
(but it could also be a prototype of the Chinese Liming LM WS10A in the
same thrust class), this would make the type not fully interchangeable
with the version selected for the J-10, which has the accessory gearbox
located on the engine bottom, Western-style. It is also possible to
speculate that the idea is to have the prototypes powered by the
lower-thrust AL-31 as used in the J-11/Su-27SK/Su-30MKK, with either an
evolved higher-thrust version of AL-31 or a series-production version
of the AL-41 being then adopted for the series aircraft.

Coming to the engine-airframe installation, the air intake located in
the bottom part of the front fuselage is of the fixed geometry type
with no moving ramp, unlike the case with the J-10. This solution has
made it possible to eliminate the sharp angles and slots between the
moving ramp and in general to provide smooth shapes which reduce radar
reflectivity. The pronounced bulging up of the air intake inner duct
helps avoid a direct presentation of the critically reflective engine
fan/compressor face to enemy illuminating radar from the forward
emisphere. In addition, the bulge is needed to make room for the nose
landing gear bay and, even more, for the bottom fuselage weapons bay.
Notwithstanding its fixed geometry, the air intake shows elements which
should generate a couple of oblique shock waves before the normal one,
thus guaranteeing an adequately efficient dynamic pressure recovery in
the supersonic flight regime. The well-shaped bulge along the bottom of
the centre fuselage entering the air intake, which forms the upper part
of the air intake duct, seems reminiscent of the latest Lockheed
Martin's vaunted design for a fixed-ramp, multi-shock air intake
planned for use on the production F-35 and already experimented on an
F-16. This peculiar layout, together with the forward-raked air intake
lip (already seen in the late 1950s on the F8U-3 CRUSADER III) is
clearly intended to generate the oblique shock waves mentioned above.

The location of the air intake under the fuselage is well suited to
provide a smooth distortion-free airflow to the engines. From this
particular point of view, the hinged bottom lip present in the TYPHOON
works even better at extreme angles of attack, but it implies the
penalty of a higher radar signature. In more general terms, the choice
of a single air intake configuration in a twin-engine airplane may be
open to some criticism, in that it is less than ideal to maintain
correct working conditions (i.e., smooth undistorted airflow to the
remaining engine) in the event of an engine flaming out for whatever
reason. The air intake thus establishes a potential single point
failure in an otherwise completely redundant twin-engine installation.

It can be expected that Thrust Vector Control (TVC) nozzles, probably
of the axisymmetric type (despite their not insignificant contribution
to overall nuclear signature), will be a standard feature of the J-14
to both enhance manoeuvrability and reduce trim drag in cruise flight.

Armament

The J-14's armament includes a six-barrel Catling gun, possibly a new
Chinese design derived from a Russian model such as the GSh-6-23 23mm
installed in the MiG-31 and the Su-24. The gun is installed in the
upper right fuselage side, just above the canard surface. The firing
port, unlike the F/A-22 is left permanently open, hence generating a
not so negligible radar reflection.

The main armament is carried in three weapons bays, whose arrangement
looks like virtually a clone of the F/A-22. Two smaller bays are
located on the fuselage sides and appear to be tailored to each
accommodate a single short-range air-to-air missile, while the large
under fuselage bay, closed by twin doors, will probably accept at least
four medium-range AAMs. It may be speculated that the J-14 is intended
to carry "compressed carriage" clipped-wing versions of the AAMs
already in use with the PLAAF, i.e. the PL-8 and the Russian R-73 for
short-range dogfights and the R-77 and the indigenous PL-12 for
medium-range work. The R-77 is already suitable for carriage in an
internal bay in its standard version, being equipped with very small
span wings while the lattice tail control fins can be fold forward
flush with the missile body.

Underwing store stations are surely foreseen to carry additional
weapons and fuel tanks, when there is no need to maintain a high level
of stealthness.

Combat Avionics

Assuming that the J-14 is already in full-scale development, the main
choices related to the avionics systems should have already been made,
at least at the conceptual level. However, the Chinese domestic
industry is almost certainly not in a position to supply the advanced
avionics required in a sophisticated aircraft like the J-14, and
contributions from abroad will be required - from Russia, Israel and
arguably even Europe.

The J-14 being intended to enter service in around 2012-2015, it may be
expected that the Chinese are aiming at equipping it with a radar with
electronically scanning (ASEA) antenna, capable of multiple targets
engagements - provided that a source for such a radar could be
identified. In the Russian tradition, a passive search and track system
based on optronic devices (FLIR with integrated laser rangefinder) is
expected to be also installed in a retractable or faired turret. As
already mentioned, the dual rear booms could carry, in addition to
various passive and/or active defensive systems also a rear-facing
radar.

Finally, it can be expected that the cockpit instrumentation for the
production version will be based on an Helmet Mounted Display/Sight
(HMD/S) totally replacing the HUD, although the latter instrument is
clearly visible in the photo. The head-down displays would probably
include three or four large Multi Function Displays (MFD), which should
have the possibility to present a digital map and a complete tactical
situation. A real-time data link is also an expected addition to the
fully integrated avionics system to enhance the situation awareness of
the pilot, particularly when operating in multiships combat groups to
make the most use of the commonly available information from the
various platforms.

Operational Aspects

The most likely enemies that China can expect to have to confront in
the future are India and the USA, this latter possibly as a result of a
Chinese attempt to follow a military option against Taiwan. Both of
these potential enemies have powerful air forces equipped with large
fleets of state-of-the-art fighters and fighter-bombers trained to
operate, in particular the Americans, as complex expeditionary forces,
well balanced in their different components and supported by a network
of other essential assets like satellites, AWACS airplanes, dedicated
electronic warfare types, aerial tankers, and more in general a whole
array of "force multiplier" elements. Given the expected operational
environment, the air defence/air superiority role is obviously the
PLAAF's #1 priority, with surface attacks against powerful naval forces
with strong aerial support (i.e., the US Navy carrier task forces)
coming possibly as priority #2.

Hence, it is not surprising that the most advanced Chinese combat
airplane ever seen appears being tailored to the air combat role,
although air-to-surface roles cannot be discarded for future
incorporation into the design. Considering what is known of the
relatively modest development pace of Chinese surface attack guided
weapons, currently there seems to be a very limited potential for the
internal carriage of such weapons, and accordingly surface attack roles
could only be carried out by compromising the aircraft's stealth
performance.

Conclusions

Should future information confirm that the aircraft depicted in this
photo is actually in full scale development, then the J-14 would
eventually emerge as the first true credible competitor to the F/A-22
and its "air dominance fighter" concept. The appearance of such a
similar-class competitor in China, and possibly in an unexpected short
time, will probably be more than enough to justify continuing
production of the F/A-22 well above the currently planned meagre total
of 179 aircraft.

The Chinese are still lagging behind in a number of critical
technologies, but their pace is well set to achieve their aims. Those
who like to dismiss the Chinese defence industry as being able only to
produce low-quality clones of outdated Western or Russian designs are
well served. Perhaps someone in the USA should possibly remember the
general complacent attitude towards the "Japs" before 7 December 1941,
and the very brutal awakening when the ZEROs wiped the P-40s, BUFFALOs
and WILDCATS clear off the skies.

Very much the same applies to those European governments that are
currently playing with the idea of resuming arms sales to China. It is
clearly preposterous to fantasise about the possibility of selling the
Chinese the TYPHOON or the RAFALE to replace their older aircraft; the
J-14 is admittedly still a decade or so away from operational service,
but it is clearly intended to be at least half a generation more
advanced than the European designs. At the very maximum, what can be
rationally expected are some contracts for the supply of specific
equipment which the local industry is not yet capable to produce, and
which the Chinese can not or would not get from Russia. Whether it
would be in the long-term European interest to supply this equipment,
is a different question altogether.

[Photograph]
A early Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) model of the J-12, showing
the general planforrm. The aircraft is shown here with two lateral air
intakes, subsequently replaced by a single ventral one

[Photograph]
The J-14 is clearly based on the aerodynamic configuration and planform
of the MiG-1.44 technology demonstrator (shown), however completely
revised for enhanced stealth features.


Weapons stats
Virtually a clone of the F/A-22
1. Single short-range air-to-air missile viewtopic.php?f=9&t=102849
2. under fuselage bay four medium-range AAMs
3. clipped-wing versions of the AAMs Russian R-73 for
short-range dogfights and the R-77 and the indigenous PL-12 for
medium-range work viewtopic.php?f=9&t=102849
Underwing store stations to carry additional
weapons and fuel tanks when there is no need to maintain a high level
of stealthiest. viewtopic.php?f=9&t=102849

_________________
let your YES be YES and your NO be NO but plz no maybe


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Unread postPosted: Fri Jun 12, 2009 8:32 pm
  

User avatar
Knight

Joined: Mon Jul 14, 2008 5:02 pm
Posts: 4008
Location: new york
Comment: NEVER QUIT..... I got lucky
AUL land base for defense or offensive on land or near AUL base only. Sometime there used to throw off the UEEF but at the cost of tank, APC and or vechles lastly all were MDC made, still many so many were many that they survive all the au to post invid era!!!!!!
Land base

Type 99

The Type 99, also known as ZTZ-99 and WZ-123, developed from the Type 98G (in turn, a development of the Type 98), is a third generation main battle tank (MBT) fielded by the Chinese People's Liberation Army. It is made to compete with other modern tanks. Although not expected to be acquired in large numbers due to its high cost compared to the more economical Type 96, it is currently the most advanced MBT fielded by China.

1. Armor Classified, Al2O3, ERA, composite, others? Primary
2. armament 125 mm smoothbore tank gun, compatible with Chinese 140mm guns

viewtopic.php?f=9&t=103553

Secondaryarmament 12.7 mm commander's machine gun, 7.62 mm coaxial machine gun
3. Engine liquid-cooled diesel
1,500 hp (1,100 kW) Power/weight 27.8 hp/tonne Suspension torsion bar Operational
range 600 km Speed 80 km/h (50 mph)


Weight ~54 tonnes Length 11.0 m Width 3.4 m Height 2.2 m Crew 3 (4 originally based on the Type 98 prototypes without autoloader)


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... t_left.jpg



Type 63 (armoured personnel carrier)


The Type 63 (industrial designation YW531) is a Chinese armoured personnel carrier that entered service in the late 1960s. It was the first armoured vehicle designed in China without Soviet assistance [1]. The design is simple and is comparable to other APCs of its time such as the M113.
Approximately 3,000 were produced by Norinco, and around 2,300 are still in service. It also equips several armies around the world and has seen action in different conflicts including the Vietnam War, the Sino-Vietnamese War, the Iran–Iraq War and the Gulf War.
Armor 14 mm maximum, welded steel Primary
armament Type 54 12.7 mm machine gun Engine 8-cylinder air-cooled, turbo-charged diesel KHD BF8L 413F
320 hp Suspension torsion bar Operational
range 500 km Speed 65 km/h, off-road 46 km/h
Weight 12.6 tonnes Length 5.476 m Width 2.978 m Height 2.58 m Crew 2 + 10

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... e63APC.jpg

T-90


he T-90 is a Russian main battle tank (MBT) derived from the T-72, and is currently the most modern tank in service with the Russian Ground Forces, Naval Infantry and the Indian Army. The successor to T-72BM, the T-90 uses the gun and 1G46 gunner sights from the T-80U, a new engine, and thermal sights. Protective measures include Kontakt-5 ERA, laser warning receivers, the EMT-7 electromagnetic pulse creator for the destruction of magnetic mines[3] and the Shtora infrared ATGM jamming system. It is designed and built by Uralvagonzavod, in Nizhny Tagil, Russia.

1. Armor Classified steel-composite-reactive blend Primary
2. armament 125 mm smoothbore gun with ATGM capability; mainly 9M119 Svir
viewtopic.php?f=9&t=103553
Secondary
3. armament 7.62 mm coaxial machine gun, 12.7 mm anti-aircraft machine gun Engine Model 84 V-84 12-cyl. diesel[2]
V-92 12-cyl. diesel[2]
V-96 12-cyl. diesel[2]
840 hp (626 kW) for Model 84 V-84 12-cyl. diesel engine[2]
1000hp (736 kW) for V-92 12-cyl. diesel engine[2]
1,250 hp (919 kW) for V-96 12-cyl. diesel engine[2]
Power/weight 18.1 hp/tonne (13.5 kW/tonne) for Model 84 V-84 12-cyl. diesel engine
21.5 hp/tonne (15.7 kW/tonne) for V-92 12-cyl. diesel engine
26.9 hp/tonne (19.8 kW/tonne) for V-96 12-cyl. diesel engine
Suspension torsion bar Operational
range 550 km[1] Speed 60 km/h[2]

Weight 46.5 tonnes Length 9.53 m (31.27 ft) Width 3.78 m (12.40 ft) Height 2.22 m (7.28 ft) Crew 3





T-72
• Armour 500 mm (20 in) of 3rd generation composite armour consisting of high hardness steel, tungsten, and plastic filler with ceramic component Primary
• Armament 125mm 2A46M smoothbore gun viewtopic.php?f=9&t=103553
Secondary
• armament 7.62mm PKT coax machine gun, 12.7mm NSVT antiaircraft machine gun Engine V-12 diesel
780 hp (582 kw) Power/weight 18.8 hp/t Suspension torsion bar Ground clearance 0.49 m (19 in) Fuel capacity 1,200 L (320 U.S. gal; 260 imp gal) Operational
• range 460 km (290 mi), 700 km (430 mi) with fuel drums Speed 80 km/h (50 mph)

Weight 41.5 tonnes (45.7 short tons) Length 9.53 m (31 ft 3 in) Width 3.59 m (11 ft 9 in) Height 2.23 m (7 ft 4 in) Crew 3
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... _Ajeya.jpg




T-54/55


The T-54 and T-55 tanks were a series of main battle tanks designed in the Soviet Union. The first T-54 prototype appeared in March 1945, just before the end of the Second World War. The T-54 entered full production in 1947 and became the main tank of the Soviet Red Army's armored units, as well as of the armies of the Warsaw Pact countries, and others. T-54s and T-55s were involved in many of the world's armed conflicts during the late twentieth century.
The T-54/55 series eventually became the most-produced tank in history. Estimated production numbers for the series range from 86,000 to 100,000.
The T-54/55 series was eventually replaced by the T-62, T-72, and T-80 in the Soviet and Russian Armies, but tanks of the series are still in use by up to 50 other armies worldwide, some having received sophisticated retrofitting.
T-54 and T-55 tanks never directly faced their NATO Cold War adversaries in Europe, however, their first appearance in the west in 1960 spurred the United States to develop the M60.[1]
1. Armour 100 mm turret, 99 mm hull Primary
2. armament D-10T 100 mm rifled gun Secondary
3. armament 2×7.62 mm SGMT machine gun, (12.7 mm DShK heavy machine gun) Engine Model V-55 12-cyl. 38.88-l diesel
581 hp (433 kW) Power/weight 14.6 hp/tonne Suspension Torsion bar Ground clearance 0.425 m Fuel capacity 961 l (254 gal) Operational
range 501 km (311 mi), 600 km (373 mi) with extra tanks Speed 55 km/h (34 mph)
Weight 39.7 tonnes Length 6.45 m Width 3.37 m Height 2.40 m Crew 4
Designer Morozov (T-54),
OKB-520 (T-54A and later) Designed 1945 Manufacturer KhPZ, UVZ (USSR),
Bumar-Łabędy (Pol.),
ZTS Martin (Czech.) Produced 1946–81 (USSR)
1956–79 (Pol.)
1957–83 (Czech.) Number built 86,000–100,000 est.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... kos_RB.jpg






BMP-3

The BMP-3 is a Russian amphibious infantry fighting vehicle, successor to the BMP-1 and BMP-2, which entered service with the Soviet army in 1987 and was first observed by the West in 1990. BMP stands for Boyevaya Mashina Pekhoty (Боевая Машина Пехоты, literally "Infantry Combat Vehicle") .



Armor 35mm max Frontal armour (est.)
Primary
armament 100mm gun Use ASC book hover tank 100 mm , 30mm autocannon 2A72
viewtopic.php?f=9&t=103553
Secondary
armament 3×7.62mm PKT machine guns Engine UTD-29M diesel
500 hp (375 kW) Power/weight 27 hp/tonne Suspension torsion bar Operational
range 600 km Speed 72 km/h (road)
45 km/h (off-road)

Weight 18.7 tonnes Length 7.14 m Width 3.2 m Height 2.4 m Crew 3 (+7 passengers)

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... 3_camo.jpg




Ural-4320


The Ural-4320 is a general purpose off-road 6x6 truck, produced at the Ural Automotive Plant in Miass, Russia for use in the Russian army. Introduced in 1976, it is still in production today. The wheel arrangement for the Ural-4320 was designed for transportation of cargoes, people and towing trailers on all types of roads and terrain.

The Ural-4320 is a development of the Ural-375D. The Ural-4320 is also used for drilling for water, oil and gas using the 1BA15 and URB-3A3 drilling rigs, which are mounted on the Ural-4320 chassis. The Ural-4320 chassis has good ground clearance, so it is preferred in regions where roads are difficult to traverse (sand, big rocks, etc). The Ural-4320 is also reliable & easy to repair/maintain. It also serves as a launching platform for the BM-21 "Grad" rocket launcher. In civilian use; it is often used as a fire truck, garbage truck, logging truck. It is also available in a 4x4 version as the Ural-43206


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... pattya.jpg




ZSU-23-4



The ZSU-23-4 "Shilka" is a lightly armored, self-propelled, radar guided anti-aircraft weapon system (SPAAG). ZSU stands for Zenitnaya Samokhodnaya Ustanovka (Russian: Зенитная Самоходная Установка), meaning "anti-aircraft self-propelled mount", 23 stands for the caliber of the armament and 4 stands for the number of gun barrels. It is named after the Russian Shilka River. It is also referred to by its nickname of "Zeus"[citatio


Armor welded steel, 9.2 mm turret, up to 15 mm hull[5] Primary
armament 4 x 23 mm 2A7 autocannons (AZP-23 "Amur" quad automatic anti-aircraft gun), ammunition 2,000 rounds Engine V-6R, 6-cylinder 4-stroke airless-injection water cooled 19.1 litre diesel
280 hp (209 kW) at 2,000 rpm[6] Power/weight 14.7 hp/tonne (11.0 kW/tonne) Suspension individual torsion bar with hydraulic shock absorbers of 1st, 5th left and 6th right road wheels Ground clearance 400 mm[3] Fuel capacity 515 l[8] Operational
range 450 km (road), 300 km (off-road)[7] Speed 50 km/h (road), 30 km/h (off-road)[7]
Weight 19 tonnes[2][3] Length 6.535 m[3] Width 3.125 m[3] Height 2.576 m (3.572 m with elevated radar)[2][4] Crew 4 (commander, driver, gunner, radar operator)

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... trun-4.jpg

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/e ... rators.png





UAZ-469
The UAZ-469 is an all-terrain vehicle manufactured by UAZ. It was used by the Red Army and other Warsaw Pact forces, as well as paramilitary units in Eastern Bloc countries. In the Soviet Union, it also saw widespread service in all state organizations that needed a robust off-road vehicle.
The UAZ-469 was introduced in 1973, replacing the earlier GAZ-69. The UAZ-469 presented two great advantages: It was able to drive in virtually any terrain and it was very easy to fix. The UAZ-469 reached legendary status for its reliability and off-road ability. The vehicle was not available for purchase by the public, but many were sold as surplus to private owners.
Modifications include a basic UAZ-469B with ground clearance of 220 mm, and a specialized military UAZ-469, with ground clearance increased to 300 mm. Since 1985, due to new industry designation standards, they were renamed: the UAZ-469 became the UAZ-3151, while the UAZ-469B became the UAZ-31512. Manufacture of UAZ-31512 for the Russian Army continues, while the manufacture for civilian market is discontinued due to new emission standards. However, the currently manufactured UAZ Hunter[1] is nothing but an updated version of old UAZ-469B.


Specifications (UAZ-469)


Column of Yugoslav Army vehicles. In front are two UAZ-469 jeeps, in middle is M53/59 Praga, and on the end is TAM-150 truck.
Engine
2,450 cc gasoline, in-line 4-cylinder, water cooled, 75 hp (56 kW) at 4000 rpm, 166.7 N•m (123 lb•ft) at 2200 rpm
Fuel
76-octane gasoline, tank capacity is 78 liters
Transmission
4-speed manual gearbox, 2-speed transfer shift, 4-wheel drive
Front axle
Live axle with leaf springs, drum brakes
Rear axle
Live axle with leaf springs, drum brakes
Dimensions and weights
• Empty weight with fuel: 1650 kg (3638 lb)
• Max. gross weight: 2450 kg (5401 lb)
• External dimensions (length/width/height): 4025 mm (158.5 in) x 1785 mm (70.3 in) x 2050 mm (80.7 in)
• Wheel base: 2380 mm (93.7 in)
• Tread front/rear: 1453 mm (57.2 in)/1453 mm (57.2 in)
• Ground clearance: 220 mm (8.7 in)
• Tire size: 215 SR 15
• Wheel size: 6Lx15

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... n_Iraq.jpg


T-84

The T-84 is a Ukrainian main battle tank, a development of the Soviet T-80 main battle tank. It was first built in 1994 and entered service in the Ukrainian Armed Forces in 1999. The T-84 is based on the diesel-engined version, the T-80UD. Its high-performance engine makes it one of the fastest existing MBTs in the world, with a power-to-weight ratio of about 26 horsepower per tonne (19 kW/t). The T-84 Oplot is an advanced version incorporating an armoured ammunition compartment in a new turret bustle; ten of these entered Ukrainian service in 2001. The T-84-120 Yatagan is a prototype model intended for export, mounting a 120 mm gun capable of firing standard NATO ammunition and guided missiles.

Specifications
Armour Steel, composite, ERA Primary
armament 125mm smoothbore gun KBA3 (43 rds.)
viewtopic.php?f=9&t=103553

Secondary

armament 7.62-mm KT-7.62 coax machine gun, 12.7-mm KT-12.7 AA machine gun Engine 12-cyl. diesel model 6TD-2
1,200 hp (895 kW) Power/weight 26 hp/tonne Suspension torsion-bar Ground clearance 0.515 m Fuel capacity 1,300 l Operational
range 540 km Speed 65 km/h
Weight 46 tonnes Length 7.086 m Width 3.775 m Height 2.215 m Crew 3
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... 84Tank.jpg




Main battle tank M1 Abrams


The M1 Abrams is a main battle tank produced in the United States. The M1 is named after General Creighton Abrams, former Army Chief of Staff and Commander of US military forces in Vietnam from 1968 to 1972. It is a well armed, heavily armored, and highly mobile tank designed for modern armored ground warfare.[4] Notable features of the M1 Abrams include the use of a powerful gas turbine engine, the adoption of sophisticated composite armor, and separate ammunition storage in a blow-out compartment for crew safety. It is one of the heaviest tanks in service, weighing in at close to 68 short tons.
The M1 Abrams entered U.S. service in 1980, replacing the 105 mm gun, full tracked M60 Patton main battle tank.[5] It did, however, serve for over a decade alongside the improved M60A3, which had entered service in 1978. Three main versions of the M1 Abrams have been deployed, the M1, M1A1, and M1A2, incorporating improved armament, protection and electronics. These improvements, as well as periodic upgrades to older tanks have allowed this long-serving vehicle to remain in front-line service. It is the principal main battle tank of the United States Army and Marine Corps, and the armies of Egypt, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, and since 2007, Australia.
Specifications
Weight 67.6 short tons (61.4 metric tons) Length Gun forward: 32.04 ft (9.77 m)
Hull length: 26.02 ft (7.93 m) Width 12 ft (3.66 m) Height 8 ft (2.44 m) Crew 4 (commander, gunner, loader, driver) Armor Chobham, RHA, steel encased depleted uranium mesh plating Primary
armament 105 mm M68 rifled cannon (M1)
120 mm M256 smoothbore cannon (M1A1, M1A2, M1A2SEP) UEEF replace it with 120 mm Use ASC book hover tank 100 mm and 100 mm Use ASC book hover tank 100 mm
Secondary
armament 1 x .50-caliber (12.7 mm) M2HB heavy machine gun
2 x M240 7.62 mm machine guns (1 pintle-mounted, 1 coaxial) Engine Honeywell AGT1500C multi-fuel turbine engine
1500 hp (1119 kW) Power/weight 24.5 hp/metric ton Transmission Allison DDA X-1100-3B Suspension Torsion bar Ground clearance 0.48 m (M1, M1A1)
0.43 m (M1A2) Operational
range 289 mi (465.29 km)[3]
With NBC system: 279 mi (449.19 km) Speed Road: 42 mph (67.7 km/h)
Off-road: 30 mph (48.3 km/h)
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... parent.png





M-95 Degman

M-95 Degman is a prototype Croatian main battle tank, developed in the factory Đuro Đaković specijalna vozila d.d., located in Slavonski Brod, Croatia. It is also known as the RH-ALAN Degman[1].The Đuro Đaković factory is best known for its principal role in the production of M-84, a Yugoslav version of the Soviet T-72 MBT produced under licence. M-95 Degman represents a further development on the M-84.
The principal improvement over the M-84 is the application of explosive reactive armor on the turret, hull front and side skirts, offering more protection against HEAT shaped-charge munitions as well as separate ammunition compartment at the back of the turret a bustle which protects the crew if tank gets hit from behind.
Đuro Đaković offers optional thermal imaging, which would allow enhanced night activity and optional 1,200 hp (890 kW) engine, which would raise the power to weight ratio to approximately 27 hp/t. There are also numerous smaller changes in fire control, communications equipment, track etc. The Degman has also a 15% faster auto loader meaning 9 shells per minute instead of 8 shells per minute.[2]
The Degman M-95 has not entered serial production yet, however two prototypes were ordered by the Croatian Government, a M-95 model and the other M-84D sample (for export). Đuro Đaković is going to be producing the export version the M-84D (for Kuwait and other potential buyers), essentially, an M-84A4 with significant upgrades. The Kuwaiti Army has confirmed interest in modernizing its 149 dated M-84 to the new M-84D standard, as well as the procurement of an additional 66 new M-84D's.[3] The far superior M-95 model will be ordered by the Croatian government.
Specifications
eight 44.5 tonnes without reactive armour, 48.5 tonnes Length 10.1 m (33 ft 2 in) Width 3.6 m (11 ft 10 in) Height 2.2 m (7 ft 3 in) Crew 3 (commander, driver and gunner)

Armor Composite armour plus Reactive armour Primary
armament
125 mm smoothbore viewtopic.php?f=9&t=103553
or
100 mm smoothbore Use ASC book hover tank
Secondary
armament Samson Remote Controlled Weapon Station Engine 12-cyl. diesel
1,200 hp (890 kW) Power/weight 27 hp/tonne Transmission two gear-boxes with side transmission in gear-box axes Suspension independent, with torsion bars, 6 hydraulic dampers, 6 road wheels and 3 return rollers per side Ground clearance 428 mm (16.9 in) Operational
range 700 km (430 mi) Speed 70 km/h (43 mph) Steering
system hydraulic
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/e ... an_041.jpg


Type 90


The Type 90 (Japanese: きゅうまるしき せんしゃ Kanji: 90式戦車) is the current main battle tank (MBT) of the Japan Ground Self-Defense Force (JGSDF). It is built by Mitsubishi Heavy Industries and was designed as a replacement for all deployed Type 61s and a portion of their Type 74 tanks, and entered service in 1990. It is slated to be complemented by the Type 10 tank.
Specifications
Weight 50.2 tonnes Length 9.755 m Width 3.33 m Height 2.33 m Crew 3

Armor Modular ceramic/steel composite armour Primary
armament 120 mm smoothbore gun with automatic loader viewtopic.php?f=9&t=103553
Or
100 mm tank rifle Use ASC book hover tank 100 mm
35 rounds
Secondary
armament M2HB 12.7 mm machine gun
1,500 rounds
7.62mm machine gun Type 74
2,000 rounds
Engine Mitsubishi 10ZG 10-cylinder, two-stroke cycle
Diesel 21500cc
1500ps/2400rpm (1,120 kW), 15min output rating: 4410N・m(450kgf・m)
Power/weight 29.9 hp/tonne Transmission Mitsubishi MT1500 automatic transmission (4 forward gears, 2 reverse gears ) Suspension hydropneumatic Operational
range 350 km (fuel 1100 L) Speed 70 km/h (acceleration: 0–200 m in 20 s)


Arjun (tank)

Arjun (Sanskrit: अर्जुन) is a main battle tank in development by India's largest defense contractor, the Defence Research and Development Organization (DRDO), for the Indian Army. The tank is named after Arjun, one of the main characters of the Indian epic the Mahabharata.
Although the development of the tank began in the early 1970s by the Combat Vehicles Research and Development Establishment (CVRDE)[1], it was only in 1996 that the Indian government decided to mass produce the tank at DRDO's facility in Avadi.[2] However, the first five units were not delivered until 2004.[3] Meanwhile, the delays and failures in the Arjun project prompted the Indian Army to order vast numbers of T-90S tanks from Russia to meet the defense needs that the Arjun had been expected to fulfill.[2][4]
The Indian Army has shown little interest in the Arjun, believing it will soon be obsolete[4][5]. While not officially going on record, the army is known to be extremely unhappy with the Arjun, having listed 14 defects that need to be rectified. These include a deficient fire control system, inaccuracy of its guns, low speeds in tactical areas – principally deserts – and its inability to operate in temperatures over 50 degrees Celsius[5]. In July 2008, the Indian Army said it would cap Arjun's induction at 124 units, thus effectively putting an end to the Arjun MBT and its derivative Tank EX.[6] India's Ministry of Defence (MoD) plans to deliver the remainder of the 124 tanks to the Indian Army by 2009[7]. India's Ministry of Defense (MOD) has also signed an agreement for the licensed production of 1,000 T-90s. With the Arjun development delayed even further , India last year signed a fresh contract with Russia to buy another 330 T-90s.[5

Specifications
Weight 58.5 tonnes Length 10.638 m Width 3.864 m Height 2.32 m Crew 4 (commander, gunner, loader and driver)
Armor steel/composite Kanchan armour. Primary
armament 100 ( ASC saga book in hover tank) or 125 mm rifled tank gun
viewtopic.php?f=9&t=103553
LAHAT anti-tank missile
HEAT, APFSDS, HESH Rounds Secondary
armament HCB 12.7mm AA MG
Mag 7.62mm Tk715 coaxial MG Engine MTU 838 Ka 501 diesel
1400 hp (1040 kW) Power/weight 26 hp/tonne Suspension hydropneumatic Ground clearance 0.45 m Fuel capacity 1610 Litre Operational
range 200 km Speed 72 km/h
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... k_test.JPG


Leopard 2
The Leopard 2 is a German main battle tank developed by Krauss-Maffei in the early 1970s and first entering service in 1979. The Leopard 2 replaced the earlier Leopard 1 as the main battle tank of the German Army. Various versions have served in the armed forces of Germany and twelve other European countries, as well as several non-European nations. More than 3,480 Leopard 2s have been manufactured. The Leopard 2 first saw combat in Kosovo with the German Army and has also seen action in Afghanistan with the Danish and Canadian ISAF forces.
There are two main development batches of the tank, the original models up to Leopard 2A4 which have vertically-faced turret armour, and the "improved" batch, namely the Leopard 2A5 and newer versions, which have angled arrow-shaped turret appliqué armour together with a number of other improvements. All models feature digital fire control systems with laser rangefinders, a fully stabilized main gun and coaxial machine gun, and advanced night vision and sighting equipment (first vehicles used a low-light level TV system or LLLTV; thermal imaging was introduced later on). The tank has the ability to engage moving targets while moving over rough terrain. It can drive through water 4 meters (13 ft) deep using a snorkel or 1.2 meters (3 ft 11 in) without any preparation and climb vertical obstacles over one metre high. The tank is powered with a turbo-charged multi-fuel V12 diesel engine that produces 1,500 PS (1,479 hp, 1,103 kW).
Specifications
Weight 62.3 tonnes Length 9.97 m (393 in) (gun forward) Width 3.75 m (148 in) Height 3.0 m (120 in) Crew 4 [1]
Armour 3rd Generation composite; including high-hardness steel, tungsten and plastic filler with ceramic component.
Primary
armament 120 mm smoothbore gun with automatic loader viewtopic.php?f=9&t=103553
Or
100 mm tank rifle Use ASC book hover tank 100 mm

armament 2 x 7.62 mm MG3A1 [1]
4,750 rounds Engine MTU MB 873 Ka-501 12-cylinder diesel
1,500 PS (1,479 hp, 1,103 kW) at 2600 rpm Power/weight 24.1 PS/t (17.7 kW/t) Transmission Renk HSWL 354 Suspension Torsion-bar Operational
range 550 km (340 mi) (internal fuel) [1] Speed 72 km/h (45 mph) [1]

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... Leo2A5.JPG

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Unread postPosted: Fri Jun 12, 2009 8:42 pm
  

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Knight

Joined: Mon Jul 14, 2008 5:02 pm
Posts: 4008
Location: new york
Comment: NEVER QUIT..... I got lucky
this was a gold mine for the AUL when they got all these military harware many are still use used by AUL till the post invid occupation era . the UEEF are shock to see use as MDC vehicles and better MDC then any other AUL land base . still they can compete with a cyclone but can do a lot of damage to disable and sometimes destroy or stop a mission for UEEF personal .

Future Combat Systems Medical Vehicle


Description
The Future Combat Systems Medical Vehicle is part of the United States Army's Future Combat Systems program. The Medical Vehicle is one of the family of Manned Ground Vehicle MGV proposed for a lighter and more transportable system in which every member of the family of ground, air, manned, and robotic, systems all report to a network system of systems to allow network centric warfare. It is a system that proposes much but is in trouble with burgeoning costs and has raised many questions about the vehicle's light weight and vulnerability to anti-armor weapons systems. It is hoped that advances in materials technology in the near future will provide the Medical Vehicle and the other vehicles of the FCS program with lightweight armor capable of providing due protection without adding significantly to the total weight.

The FCS Medical Vehicle is designed to provide advanced trauma life support within 1 hour to critically injured soldiers. The Medical Vehicle serves as the primary medical system within the Unit of Action (UA) and will have two mission modules: Evacuation and Treatment. The time-sensitive nature of treating critically injured soldiers requires an immediately responsive force health protection system with an expedient field evacuation system. The XM1207 FCS Medical Vehicle-Evacuation (MV-E) vehicle allows trauma specialists, maneuvering with combat forces, to be closer to the casualty’s point-of-injury and is used for casualty evacuation. The XM1208 Medical Vehicle-Treatment (MV-T) vehicle enhances the ability to provide Advanced Trauma Management (ATM)/Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) treatments and procedures forward for more rapid casualty interventions and clearance of the battlespace. Both FCS Medical Vehicle mission modules will be capable of conducting medical procedures and treatments using installed networked telemedicine interfaces, Medical Communications for Combat Casualty Care and the Theater Medical Information Program (TMIP).

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... 8_MV-T.jpg

Future Combat Systems Recovery and Maintenance Vehicle

Part of the proposed Future Combat Systems This is one of the family of Manned Ground Vehicle MGV proposed for a lighter and more transportable system in which every member of the family of ground, air, manned, and robotic, systems all report to a network system of systems to allow network centric warfare. It is a system that proposes much but is in trouble with burgoning costs and many questions about the vehicles light weight and vulernability to anti-armor weapons systems.
The XM1205 Future Combat Systems Recovery and Maintenance Vehicle (FRMV) is the recovery and maintenance system for employment within both the Unit of Action (UA) and Unit of Employment (UE) and contributes to sustaining and generating combat power to the Future Force structure. Each Unit of Action (UA) will have a small number of 2-3 man Combat Repair Teams within the organic Forward Support Battalion (FSB) to perform field maintenance requirements beyond the capabilities of the crew chief/crew, more in-depth Battle Damage Assessment Repair (BDAR), and limited recovery operations. The Recovery and Maintenance Vehicle (FRMV) is designed to hold a crew of three with additional space for three additional recovered crew. The Recovery and Maintenance Vehicle (FRMV) has a Close Combat Support Weapon (CCSW) and 40mm Mk 19 grenade launcher
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... 5_FRMV.jpg



Armed Robotic Vehicle
The Armed Robotic Vehicle Assault Light (ARV-A-L) or XM1219 is a mobility platform based on the MULE chassis, with an integrated weapons and reconnaissance, surveillance, and target acquisition (RSTA) package to support the dismounted infantry’s efforts to locate and destroy enemy platforms and positions. As the program's centerpiece, the Common Mobility Platform (CMP) provides superior mobility built around an advanced propulsion and articulated suspension system. This system gives Soldiers vehicles in which to negotiate complex terrain, obstacles, and gaps that a dismounted squad will encounter.
Mobility Capabilities
• Transportable inside a C-130 Hercules and CH-47 Chinook.
• Transportable, slung under a UH-60 Black Hawk.
• Climb more than a 1 metre (3 ft 3 in) step.
• Cross a 1 metre (3 ft 3 in) gap.
• Traverse side slopes of 40 percent.
• Ford water obstacles over 0.5 metres (1 ft 8 in).
• Cross obstacles as high as 0.5 metres (1 ft 8 in).



http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... RV-A-L.jpg


Future Combat Systems Medical Vehicle

The Future Combat Systems Medical Vehicle is part of the United States Army's Future Combat Systems program. The Medical Vehicle is one of the family of Manned Ground Vehicle MGV proposed for a lighter and more transportable system in which every member of the family of ground, air, manned, and robotic, systems all report to a network system of systems to allow network centric warfare. It is a system that proposes much but is in trouble with burgeoning costs and has raised many questions about the vehicle's light weight and vulnerability to anti-armor weapons systems. It is hoped that advances in materials technology in the near future will provide the Medical Vehicle and the other vehicles of the FCS program with lightweight armor capable of providing due protection without adding significantly to the total weight.

Description

The FCS Medical Vehicle is designed to provide advanced trauma life support within 1 hour to critically injured soldiers. The Medical Vehicle serves as the primary medical system within the Unit of Action (UA) and will have two mission modules: Evacuation and Treatment. The time-sensitive nature of treating critically injured soldiers requires an immediately responsive force health protection system with an expedient field evacuation system. The XM1207 FCS Medical Vehicle-Evacuation (MV-E) vehicle allows trauma specialists, maneuvering with combat forces, to be closer to the casualty’s point-of-injury and is used for casualty evacuation. The XM1208 Medical Vehicle-Treatment (MV-T) vehicle enhances the ability to provide Advanced Trauma Management (ATM)/Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) treatments and procedures forward for more rapid casualty interventions and clearance of the battlespace. Both FCS Medical Vehicle mission modules will be capable of conducting medical procedures and treatments using installed networked telemedicine interfaces, Medical Communications for Combat Casualty Care and the Theater Medical Information Program (TMIP).

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... 8_MV-T.jpg

Future Combat Systems Recovery and Maintenance Vehicle


Part of the proposed Future Combat Systems This is one of the family of Manned Ground Vehicle MGV proposed for a lighter and more transportable system in which every member of the family of ground, air, manned, and robotic, systems all report to a network system of systems to allow network centric warfare. It is a system that proposes much but is in trouble with burgoning costs and many questions about the vehicles light weight and vulernability to anti-armor weapons systems.
The XM1205 Future Combat Systems Recovery and Maintenance Vehicle (FRMV) is the recovery and maintenance system for employment within both the Unit of Action (UA) and Unit of Employment (UE) and contributes to sustaining and generating combat power to the Future Force structure. Each Unit of Action (UA) will have a small number of 2-3 man Combat Repair Teams within the organic Forward Support Battalion (FSB) to perform field maintenance requirements beyond the capabilities of the crew chief/crew, more in-depth Battle Damage Assessment Repair (BDAR), and limited recovery operations. The Recovery and Maintenance Vehicle (FRMV) is designed to hold a crew of three with additional space for three additional recovered crew. The Recovery and Maintenance Vehicle (FRMV) has a Close Combat Support Weapon (CCSW) and 40mm Mk 19 grenade launche


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... 5_FRMV.jpg


Armed Robotic Vehicle


The Armed Robotic Vehicle Assault Light (ARV-A-L) or XM1219 is a mobility platform based on the MULE chassis, with an integrated weapons and reconnaissance, surveillance, and target acquisition (RSTA) package to support the dismounted infantry’s efforts to locate and destroy enemy platforms and positions. As the program's centerpiece, the Common Mobility Platform (CMP) provides superior mobility built around an advanced propulsion and articulated suspension system. This system gives Soldiers vehicles in which to negotiate complex terrain, obstacles, and gaps that a dismounted squad will encounter.

Mobility Capabilities
• Transportable inside a C-130 Hercules and CH-47 Chinook.
• Transportable, slung under a UH-60 Black Hawk.
• Climb more than a 1 metre (3 ft 3 in) step.
• Cross a 1 metre (3 ft 3 in) gap.
• Traverse side slopes of 40 percent.
• Ford water obstacles over 0.5 metres (1 ft 8 in).
• Cross obstacles as high as 0.5 metres (1 ft 8 in).


Primary Use ASC book hover tank 100 mm tank rifle
armament Line-of-sight gun Secondary machine gun .50 caliber SDC or MDC
armament Anti tank weapons Engine 6x6 in-hub electric motors
Diesel-electric Guidance
system Robotic / command control

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... RV-A-L.jpg

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/e ... 012706.jpg


Class IV UAV


The Class IV UAV is an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) intended to provide Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR), target acquisition, and aerial communications extension capability at the brigade level for the United States Army's Future Combat Systems program. Other missions include mine and improvised explosive device detection, standoff chemical biological and radiological detection, and electronic intelligence collection. It will be organic to the Reconnaissance Surveillance Target Acquisition Squadron within the FCS brigade combat team, which will consist of troops of manned armed reconnaissance helicopters (ARH) and a separate troop of Class IV UAVs.

At the anticipated time of fielding, the Block III Apache attack helicopter will have the capability to control Class IV UAVs from the cockpit, receive their imagery products, and exploit their remote laser designation capability. This manned-unmanned teaming capability will also be available on later models of the ARH.
The system (composed of 4 air vehicles and associated HMMWV-based ground control and automated launch and recovery systems), is required to operate continuously for 18-24 hours over a 75 kilometres (47 mi) radius. Each vehicle is an MQ-8B Fire Scout, capable of 8 hours continuous flight and a payload of 130 pounds (59 kg).


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... Scout.jpeg

Unattended Ground Sensors



here are two types of Unattended Ground Sensors that are being fielded under the United States Army's Future Combat Systems Program, the Urban UGS or U-UGS and the Tactical UGS or T-UGS. Current generation is manufactured by Textron Defense Systems a subcontrator under Boeing.
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/f/fd/Tugs.jpg

Tactical Unattended Ground Sensor
T-UGS are small ground-based sensors that collect intelligence through seismic, acoustic, Radiological Nuclear and Electro-Optic means. These sensors are networked devices that provide an early warning system to supplement a platoon size element and are capable of remote operation. To an extent T-UGS will detect, track, classify, and identify personnel and vehicles within its coverage area and report to the FCS Network in near real-time.
T-UGS is comprised of the following sensor systems:
• The Gateway Node, which is a router and data collector that sends information back to a FCS Network equipped vehicle.
• The Intelligence Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) Node, which is the key component that acquires and tracks personnel, vehicles and aircraft through seismic and acoustic means.
• The Electro-Optic Node obtains information from the ISR node and pans its camera toward the Point of Interest and is able to track and send images through the FCS Network.
• The Radiological Nuclear Node is capable of measuring and reporting gamma dose-rate and accumulated dose from a fallout environment in a tactical battlefield situation. Detected radiological events will be transmitted via a detailed spot report through the Gateway Node to an operator on the FCS network.
Urban Unattended Ground Sensor
For urban areas, the Urban-Unattended Ground Sensors (U-UGS) is used as a surveillance tool during building clearing operations, caves, sewers, tunnels, and other confined spaces. Textron Defense Systems, along with Honeywell, designed these wireless, hand emplaced system of sensors to be lightweight and low cost. The U-UGS network is capable of taking field-of-view images of intruders in all light conditions and transmit images to the FCS Network where immediate recognition of human intruders can be achieved or using a motion detections only sensor to detect intruders when imaging is not needed.
The U-UGS sensors are made up of the following:
• The Gateway bridges the U-UGS sensor field to the FCS network and relays motion alarm and image data. It is capable to be monitored locally by a soldier or remotely through a FCS Network enabled vehicle.
• The Intrusion node basically is a motion sensor that detects movement and is able to tell the difference between animal and human.
• The Imager node is a combination of motion sensor and all light condition capable camera. Whereas making identification much more easier.



http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/f/fd/Tugs.jpg

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/1/10/Uugs.jpg




Future Combat Systems Mounted Combat System
The XM1202 Future Combat Systems Mounted Combat System (MCS) is a planned U.S. Army tank, one of a subsystem of light-weight military vehicles, which is part of the Army's Future Combat Systems, a massive modernization effort.
The MCS is to be a light-weight, rapid deployment-enabled combat vehicle that could be transported anywhere in the world with very short notice. The goal is to be able to fit two units inside a C-17 or one inside a smaller C-130 Hercules transport plane; however, notwithstanding reports that the C-130 rapid transport goal would not be met,[1] the Manned Ground Vehicles still have a requirement to be transported via C-130 if necessary, albeit not necessarily in a combat-ready state.
The MCS will provide both direct and Beyond-Line-of-Sight (BLOS) offensive firepower capability, allowing for in-depth destruction of point targets up to 8 km (5 mi) away. This requires the use of an integrated sensor network to detect enemy forces.
The MCS is intended to deliver precision fire at a rapid rate, in order to destroy multiple targets at standoff ranges quickly, and will complement the other systems in the Unit of Action. It will be capable of providing direct support to the dismounted infantry in an assault, defeating bunkers, and breaching walls during tactical assaults. It is also intended to be highly mobile, in order to maneuver out of contact and into positions of advantage; given the vehicle's light weight, this is especially important.
The common MGV chassis is required to provide full protection from 30 and 45mm cannon fire in a 60 degree arc opening towards the front of the vehicle. 360 degree protection must also be provided from small arms fire up to 14.5mm heavy machine gun and 155mm artillery shell air-bursts. Protection from higher caliber rounds as well as anti-tank guided missiles will be provided by an active protection system manufactured by Raytheon known as "Quick Kill".
The MCS will consist of the common Manned Ground Vehicle chassis and autoloading line-of-sight and BLOS capability.
The subsystem of vehicles that includes the MCS will also consist of a reconnaissance and target acquisition vehicle, an infantry fighting vehicle, a non-line-of-sight cannon, a non-line-of-sight mortar, a command and control vehicle, a combat ambulance, and a recovery vehicle. However, an October 2005 Pentagon report recommended "further delaying the Army's Future Combat Systems program."[2]
Specifications Crew 3 Primary
armament 125 mm cannon viewtopic.php?f=9&t=103553
Or Use ASC book hover tank 100 mm tank rifle
( it really a 120 mm cannon )
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... 02_MCS.jpg

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Unread postPosted: Fri Jun 12, 2009 8:49 pm
  

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Knight

Joined: Mon Jul 14, 2008 5:02 pm
Posts: 4008
Location: new york
Comment: NEVER QUIT..... I got lucky
this new hardware will be use for AUL personal to escape dying again the UEEF and later later as a high drop of for troops as well give the UEEF a very nasty surprise. as efction systems it provide a better range to pilots to cover up 50 to 89 miles range from over 25000 feet anything higher will give up to 100 miles max at speed up 135 MPH !!!! and max out 250 mph with a range of 150 miles

MDC 25 the suit gilder 45 MDC

The technological advances of World War I made it one of the most gruesome "modern" wars, but the trickling of war-time technologies into civilian life has usually proven beneficial. And if nothing else, defense tech makes for some really neat toys. Hopefully, such is the case with the Gryphon, a stealth glider from SPELCO GbR which has recently been upgraded, now weighing in at only 30 pounds (thanks, in part, to its carbon fiber frame). It steers via hand held rotary controls that Ted Selker would have a field day with, and now features the option of weaponization.

The Gryphon is intended for use by paratroopers doing high altitude drops (at speeds of up to 150 mph), making the pilots of the perfectly good planes the troopers hurl themselves out of safer by removing the need for combat zone proximity. While the Gryphon is currently only being developed for military use, SPELCO GbR notes that "It can be adapted fast and easily to special needs and requirements," one such adaptation being the addition of a small jet engine (normally used on unmanned military drones) to increase speed. I don’t think I’m alone when I ask that one of these adaptations be a commercial version for all of us budding crimefighters out there.
http://www.johnmacneill.com/MX_Gryphon.html
It weighs only 30 pounds and can be fully weaponized for assault and rescue. It has a 6-foot jet-wing that is steered with handheld rotary controls connected to its rudder. And it can hide more than 100 pounds of combat gear in a built-in compartment.
The Gryphon attack glider, designed to penetrate combat zones at 135 miles per hour, could revolutionize the art of parachuting.

http://www.coolest-gadgets.com/wp-conte ... yphon1.jpg

Its helmet has a heads-up display and provides on-board oxygen for the jump. To land, a soldier separates the wing from his pack and releases his parachute to slow his descent. The wing remains attached to the soldier by a cord and lands before him.
Currently, planes and pilots are put at risk because soldiers need to jump close to combat areas. Typical high altitude, high-opening, or HAHO, jumps from around 27,000 feet allow soldiers to travel only about 30 miles after exiting the aircraft.
The Gryphon could increase that range fourfold, creating an attack corridor of nearly 125 miles. Unaffected by headwinds or crosswinds because of its favorable lift-to-drag ratio, the glider would allow elite units to reach targets with increased speed, precision and stealth.

http://a11news.com/images/attack-glider-storage-bin.jpg

Attaching an optional small turbo jet, like those currently being used for unmanned military drones, allows the glider to maintain altitude with lower jump heights and travel farther than is currently possible with any other method.


http://a11news.com/images/gryphon-attac ... skyray.jpg

The Gryphon’s built-in oxygen supply system allows soldiers to jump from up to 30,000 feet. And with temperatures at that altitude sometimes reaching minus 64 degrees Fahrenheit, every second counts. Even in upwind conditions, the Gryphon could reduce HAHO jump duration to a third, from an average of 45 minutes to just 15, vastly reducing the risk of exposure to extreme cold.
The Gryphon’s designers, SPELCO GbR, are even planning to affix a relatively cheap and small turbo jet, which is used for unmanned military drones. Harnessing that jet, the glider would allow soldiers to jump lower, maintain altitude and travel farther than is currently possible.

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Unread postPosted: Sun Jun 14, 2009 9:25 pm
  

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Knight

Joined: Mon Jul 14, 2008 5:02 pm
Posts: 4008
Location: new york
Comment: NEVER QUIT..... I got lucky
These are used by aul as decoys or force recon units which have been very use against UEG forces
MQ-9 Reaper

The MQ-9 Reaper (originally the Predator B) is an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) developed by General Atomics Aeronautical Systems (GA-ASI) for use by the United States Air Force, the United States Navy, and the British Royal Air Force. The MQ-9 is the first hunter-killer UAV designed for long-endurance, high-altitude surveillance.
The MQ-9 is a larger and more capable aircraft than the earlier MQ-1 Predator. It can use MQ-1's ground systems. The MQ-9 has a 950-shaft-horsepower turboprop engine, far more powerful than the Predator's 115 hp (86 kW) piston engine. The increase in power allows the Reaper to carry 15 times more ordnance and cruise at three times the speed of the MQ-1.[


In 2008 the New York Air National Guard 174th Fighter Wing began to transition from F-16 piloted planes to MQ-9 Reaper drones, which are capable of remote controlled or autonomous flight, becoming the first all-robot attack squadron.

Then U.S. Air Force Chief of Staff General T. Michael Moseley said, "We've moved from using UAVs primarily in intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance roles before Operation Iraqi Freedom, to a true hunter-killer role with the Reaper”
As of 2009 the Air Force’s fleet stands at 195 Predators and 28 Reapers.[2]


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... 007%29.jpg

GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS
• Contractor: General Atomics Aeronautical Systems Incorporated
• Crew(remote): 2 (Pilot plus a sensor operator)[47]
• Landing Type: runway
• Launch Type: runway
• Power Plant: Honeywell TP331-10T turboprop engine, 950 SHP (712 kW)
• Fuel Capacity: 1815 kg (4,000 lb)
• Length: 11 m (36 ft)
• Wingspan: 20 m (66 ft)
• Height: 3.8 m (12.5 ft)
• Empty weight: 2223 kg (4,900 lb)
• Max takeoff weight: 4760 kg (10,500 lb)[48]
PERFORMANCE
• Service ceiling: 15 km (50,000 ft)
• Operational altitude: 7.5 km (25,000 ft) [49]
• Endurance: 14–28 hours (14 hours fully loaded) [50]
• Range: 5,926 km (3,200 nmi, 3,682 mi)
• Payload: 3,750 lb (1,700 kg)
• Maximum speed: 482 km/h (300 mph, 260 knots)
• Cruise speed: 276-313 km/h (172-195 mph, 150-170 knots) [51]
SENSORS
• AN/APY-8 Lynx II radar[52]
• AN/DAS-1 MTS-B Multi-Spectral Targeting System [53]
ARMAMENT
• 6 Hardpoints
o 1,500 lb (680 kg) on the two inboard weapons stations
o 500–600 lb (230–270 kg) on the two middle stations
o 150–200 lb (68–91 kg) on the outboard stations
o viewtopic.php?f=9&t=102849
• Up to 14x AGM-114 Hellfire air to ground missiles can be carried or four Hellfire missiles and two 500 lb (230 kg) GBU-12 Paveway II laser-guided bombs. The 500 lb (230 kg) GBU-38 Joint Direct Attack Munition (JDAM) can also be carried. Testing is underway to allow for the addition of the AIM-92 Stinger air-to-air missile to be carried as well.



http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... 007%29.jpg
The MQ-9 Reaper (originally the Predator B) is an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) developed by General Atomics Aeronautical Systems (GA-ASI) for use by the United States Air Force, the United States Navy, and the British Royal Air Force. The MQ-9 is the first hunter-killer UAV designed for long-endurance, high-altitude surveillance.[4]
The MQ-9 is a larger and more capable aircraft than the earlier MQ-1 Predator. It can use MQ-1's ground systems. The MQ-9 has a 950-shaft-horsepower turboprop engine, far more powerful than the Predator's 115 hp (86 kW) piston engine. The increase in power allows the Reaper to carry 15 times more ordnance and cruise at three times the speed of the MQ-1.[4]
In 2008 the New York Air National Guard 174th Fighter Wing began to transition from F-16 piloted planes to MQ-9 Reaper drones, which are capable of remote controlled or autonomous flight, becoming the first all-robot attack squadron.[5][6][7]
Then U.S. Air Force Chief of Staff General T. Michael Moseley said, "We've moved from using UAVs primarily in intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance roles before Operation Iraqi Freedom, to a true hunter-killer role with the Reaper."[4]
As of 2009 the Air Force’s fleet stands at 195 Predators and 28 Reapers.[2]
Specifications
This aircraft article is missing some (or all) of its specifications. If you have a source, you can help Wikipedia by adding them.
MQ-9 Reaper taxis.
Several minor variations of the RQ-9/MQ-9 exist; these values are indicative.
GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS
• Contractor: General Atomics Aeronautical Systems Incorporated
• Crew(remote): 2 (Pilot plus a sensor operator)[47]
• Landing Type: runway
• Launch Type: runway
• Power Plant: Honeywell TP331-10T turboprop engine, 950 SHP (712 kW)
• Fuel Capacity: 1815 kg (4,000 lb)
• Length: 11 m (36 ft)
• Wingspan: 20 m (66 ft)
• Height: 3.8 m (12.5 ft)
• Empty weight: 2223 kg (4,900 lb)
• Max takeoff weight: 4760 kg (10,500 lb)[48]
PERFORMANCE
• Service ceiling: 15 km (50,000 ft)
• Operational altitude: 7.5 km (25,000 ft) [49]
• Endurance: 14–28 hours (14 hours fully loaded) [50]
• Range: 5,926 km (3,200 nmi, 3,682 mi)
• Payload: 3,750 lb (1,700 kg)
• Maximum speed: 482 km/h (300 mph, 260 knots)
• Cruise speed: 276-313 km/h (172-195 mph, 150-170 knots) [51]
SENSORS
• AN/APY-8 Lynx II radar[52]
• AN/DAS-1 MTS-B Multi-Spectral Targeting System [53]
ARMAMENT
• 6 Hardpoints
o 1,500 lb (680 kg) on the two inboard weapons stations
o 500–600 lb (230–270 kg) on the two middle stations
o 150–200 lb (68–91 kg) on the outboard stations
o viewtopic.php?f=9&t=102849
• Up to 14x AGM-114 Hellfire air to ground missiles can be carried or four Hellfire missiles and two 500 lb (230 kg) GBU-12 Paveway II laser-guided bombs. The 500 lb (230 kg) GBU-38 Joint Direct Attack Munition (JDAM) can also be carried. Testing is underway to allow for the addition of the AIM-92 Stinger air-to-air missile to be carried as well.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... 080331.jpg

_________________
let your YES be YES and your NO be NO but plz no maybe


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Unread postPosted: Sun Jun 14, 2009 9:25 pm
  

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Knight

Joined: Mon Jul 14, 2008 5:02 pm
Posts: 4008
Location: new york
Comment: NEVER QUIT..... I got lucky
The Lockheed MC-130
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... lon_II.jpg

The Lockheed MC-130 is the basic designation for a family of special missions aircraft operated by the Air Force Special Operations Command (AFSOC) of the United States Air Force. Based on the C-130 Hercules transport, their mission is the `infiltration, exfiltration, and resupply of special operations forces, as well as psychological operations support and helicopter air refueling.
Members of the family include the MC-130E Combat Talon I, MC-130H Combat Talon II, MC-130W Combat Spear, and MC-130P Combat Shadow. A possible MC-130 variant, designated the XFC-130H, did not proceed beyond the development stage, but one of its aircraft became the YMC-130H test bed aircraft for the Combat Talon II.
The MC-130E was the first Combat Talon and was developed to support clandestine special operations missions during the Vietnam War. 18 were created by modifying C-130E transports, and four lost through attrition, but the remainder continue in service more than four decades after their initial modification. An updated Combat Talon II was developed in the 1980s from the C-130H variant of the Hercules and went into service in the 1990s. Four its 24 original aircraft have been lost in operations. The Combat Spear was implemented in 2006 as a cost effective program to supplement the Combat Talon II force, based on the same airframe. The Combat Shadow version is a redesignation of part of the HC-130 inventory, developed during the Vietnam War for search and rescue operations, several of which were diverted to AFSOC in the 1980s to provide it organic air refueling assets.
The aircrews of this family of aircraft feel that they occupy a special niche in the special operations community, epitomized by this summation:
"We knew what we did was different and special. We flew special type aircraft. We supported Special Forces from other services and countries. Every mission was different. Every mission was at night, low level, and we were either picking up something important or inserting something important. You got this feeling in the school house, in the squadrons, and at the bar. . . . I would always hear some ranking officer say—there ain’t nothing special about special ops. That’s when I knew we were really special." — Col. Jerry Uttaro, USAF (ret.)[7]
specifications (MC-130H Combat Talon II)
Data from United States Air Force Factsheet
General characteristics
• Crew: 7
• Capacity: 77 troops, 52 paratroopers or 57 litter patients
• Length: 99 feet, 9 inches (30.4 meters)
• Wingspan: 132 feet, 7 inches (40.4 meters)
• Height: 38 feet, 6 inches (11.7 meters)
• Empty weight: 72,892 pounds (32, 801 kilogram)
• Max takeoff weight: 155,000 pounds (69,750 kilogram)
• Powerplant: 4× 1 Allison Engine Company T56-A-15 turboprop engines, 4,910 shaft horsepower (3660 kW) each
Performance
• Cruise speed: 300 mi/hr (482 km/h)
• Range: 2,700 nautical miles (4,344 kilometers)
• Service ceiling: 33,000 feet (10,000 meter

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Unread postPosted: Mon Jun 15, 2009 9:58 pm
  

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If you are going to be using MDC, one great mission for any AUL player characters would be the theft of the technology to make MDC materials. I really like the additions ZINO. Bravo!

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Unread postPosted: Mon Jun 15, 2009 10:08 pm
  

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Beatmeclever wrote:
If you are going to be using MDC, one great mission for any AUL player characters would be the theft of the technology to make MDC materials. I really like the additions ZINO. Bravo!

a team of AUL ( playing characters , they think they are really on the good guys do i have them tricke )made a big battle over a secret UEG base to get that they stank jack and capture come UEG jets

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Unread postPosted: Mon Jun 15, 2009 10:23 pm
  

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Sounds like you're having fun with it. Keep up the good work!

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"The impossibility of the world lies in the fact that it has no equivalent anywhere;it cannot be exchanged for anything. The uncertainty of thought lies in the fact that it cannot be exchanged either for truth or for reality. Is it thought which tips the world over into uncertainty, or the other way around? This in itself is part of the uncertainty." - J. Baudrillard


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Unread postPosted: Mon Jun 15, 2009 10:43 pm
  

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M60 Patton

The M60 Series was a main battle tank (MBT) [1] introduced in December 1960[2]. It was widely used by the U.S. and its Cold War allies, especially those in NATO, and remains in service throughout the world today despite being superseded by the M1 Abrams. Egypt is currently the largest operator with 1,700 upgraded M60A3s, Turkey second with more than 900 upgraded units in service, and Israel third with over 700 units of Israeli variants.


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... sa_023.jpg

Specifications


Height M60: 11.92' (3.6 m) M60: 10.54' (3.2 m)
Crew 4 Armor 150 mm (6.12")
Primary
armament
105 mm (4.1") M68 gun (M60/A1/A3) ( use 100 in ASC saga book
152mm (6 in) M162 Gun/Launcher (M60A2 Secondary
armament .50 (12.7 mm) M85
7.62 mm machine gun Engine Continental AVDS-1790-2 V12 air cooled, twin turbocharged diesel
750 hp Power/weight
14.5 hp/ton Suspension
Torsion bars
Ground clearance
15.3" (389 mm)
Operational
range 300 miles (480 km) Speed 30 mph (48 km/h)



The M60 traces its roots to the late WWII-era M26 Pershing heavy tank from which the M48 was developed. In 1957, plans were laid in the US for a tank with a 105 mm main gun and a redesigned hull offering better armor protection.
The resultant M60 series largely resembled the M48 it was based on, but there were significant differences. The M60 mounted a bore evacuated 105 mm main gun, compared with the M48's 90 mm, had a hull with a straight front slope where the M48's was rounded, had three support rollers per side to the M48's five, and had road wheels constructed from aluminum rather than steel.
The improved design incorporated a Continental V-12 750 hp air-cooled, twin-turbocharged diesel engine, extending operational range to over 300 miles (480 km) while reducing both refueling and servicing. Power was transmitted to a final drive through a cross drive transmission, a combined transmission, differential, steering, and braking unit.
The hull of the M60 was a single piece steel casting divided into three compartments, with the driver in front, fighting compartment in the middle and engine at the rear[6]. The driver looked through three M27 day periscopes, one of which could be replaced by a night vision periscope[7]. Initially, the M60 had essentially the same turret shape as the M48, but this was subsequently replaced with a distinctive "needlenose" design that minimized frontal cross-section to enemy fire.
The M60 was the first and last U.S. main battle tank to utilize homogeneous steel armor for protection. It was also the last to feature either the M60 machine gun or an escape hatch under the hull.
Originally designated the M68, the new vehicle was put into production in 1959, reclassified as the M60, and entered service in 1960. Over 15,000 M60s (all variants) were constructed.


MGM-51 Shillelagh

The Ford MGM-51 Shillelagh was an anti-tank guided missile designed to be launched from a conventional gun (cannon). It was originally intended to be the medium-range portion of a short, medium, long-range system for armored fighting vehicles in the 1960s and '70s to defeat future armor without an excessively large gun. Developing a system that could fire both shells and missiles reliably would prove complex and largely unworkable. It served most notably as a primary weapon of the M551 Sheridan light tank, but the missile system was deleted from units serving in Vietnam. Ultimately very few of the 88,000 rounds produced were ever fired in combat.
The Shillelagh was a disappointment compared to the later BGM-71 TOW anti-tank guided missile first produced in 1970 by the U.S. The TOW system, which could not fire gun rounds, and was guided by a wire which directly sent commands to the missile, would prove simpler and more versatile. TOW would become the most widely used anti-tank guided missile in the world based on a range of light, armoured and flying vehicles. Main battle tanks of the late 20th century such as the successful M-1 Abrams tank would field improved conventional 105mm and 120mm guns which proved effective against enemy armor threats. Since then, the Soviets and other nations have developed gun launched missiles, and the US is developing guided tank rounds.
The name comes from a type of wooden club associated with Ireland.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/e ... Museum.jpg
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/e ... MGM-51.jpg

The most ambitious project based on the system was the MBT-70, an advanced US-German tank design that started in 1963. It mounted a huge auto-loader turret on top of a very short chassis, so short that there was no room for a driver. Instead he was relocated into the turret with everyone else, in a rotating cupola that kept him facing forward. The gun was a new longer-barreled design, the XM-150, which extended range and performance to the point where it was useful for sabot type rounds as well. However the project dragged on, and in 1969 the estimated unit cost had risen 5 times, and Germany pulled out of the effort. The Army proposed a "cut-down" version of the system, but Congress cancelled it in November 1971. It started the M1 Abrams project with its funds the next month, which would use a conventional gun.
The Soviet KBP Instrument Design Bureau developed the somewhat similar AT-11 Sniper, launched by a 125 mm gun system. It had a Laser Beam Rider guidance system, tandem warhead to defeat vehicles fitted with Explosive Reactive Armour, and used on the T80/72M Tank.


MBT-70


The MBT-70 was a 1960s joint German -U.S.-project to develop a new main battle tank using a number of advanced design features. It used a kneeling suspension, housed the entire crew in the turret, and the American version incorporated a gun-fired missile.
By the late 1960s the project was well over budget and the Germans withdrew from the effort, developing their Leopard 2 instead. Development continued in the US, but the per-unit cost had risen five times, and in 1971 Congress overrode the Army's objections and the MBT-70's funding was redirected to create the more successful M1 Abrams.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... MBT-70.jpg
In the early 1960s, it became clear that the USSR was planning to introduce a successor to their T-62 and T-55/54 designs, one with an auto-loading gun and better armor, which was eventually delivered as the T-64 and the cheaper T-72. The new design would place the US's existing M60 tanks at a disadvantage, so the U.S. Army started looking at designs that would surpass any potential Soviet design. The Germans faced the same problem; the recently introduced Leopard 1 tanks were on the verge of becoming obsolete after only a few years. An upgrade project for the Leopard was already underway, but it appeared this model would not be enough of an advance to be worthwhile.
The result was a joint agreement to develop a single new tank for both armies. However, this may have been one of the worst things to happen to the project, as both teams started "pulling" the design in their own directions. Arguments arose over almost every part of the design: the gun, the engine, even whether or not the design would use metric or SAE measurements. This last dispute was eventually "settled" by using both systems, thereby increasing costs considerably.
Suspension
Many features of the MBT-70 were ahead of their time. The vehicle used an advanced hydropneumatic suspension system that allowed for fast cross-country speeds even though it was to weigh 50 tons. The suspension could be raised or lowered on command by the driver, down to put the bottom of the tank just over 100 mm (4 inches) from the ground, or up to 700mm (28 inches) for cross-country running.
Armor
The armor consisted of two spaced layers, the inner a softer steel that also served as a spall liner, and the outer of harder cold-rolled steel. The spacing was included to help defeat HEAT rounds, notably those on wire guided missiles, then one of the most dangerous weapons deployed against tanks. The design included bulkheads, fireproof doors, and blow-out sections in the ammunition storage area to minimize crew injury when a hit was received.

Hull and turret
The MBT-70 was designed with a low silhouette (low height), something which had not been addressed on the M60 whose high silhouette was considered a serious drawback. In fact, the MBT-70 ended up so low, just over 6 feet (1.8 m) from the floor to the top of the turret, that there was no room for the driver in the main hull. Instead he was placed with the rest of the crew in the seemingly oversized turret, in a contrarotating cupola that was geared to keep him facing forward. If needed, the cupola could be turned around to face to the rear, allowing the tank to be driven "backwards" at full speed.
Powerplant
US versions were to mount the new Continental AVCR air-cooled V-12 diesel of 1470 hp (1096 kW). German versions originally used a similar Daimler-Benz model, but later moved to an MTU design of 1500 hp (1,100 kW). The MTU unit could be easily swapped out of the tank, along with the drive train, in 15 minutes. Both versions could reach 43 mph (69 km/h) on their engines, at the time an unheard-of speed for such a large tank.
The MBT-70 was designed with a low silhouette (low height), something which had not been addressed on the M60 whose high silhouette was considered a serious drawback. In fact, the MBT-70 ended up so low, just over 6 feet (1.8 m) from the floor to the top of the turret, that there was no room for the driver in the main hull. Instead he was placed with the rest of the crew in the seemingly oversized turret, in a contrarotating cupola that was geared to keep him facing forward. If needed, the cupola could be turned around to face to the rear, allowing the tank to be driven "backwards" at full speed.
Powerplant
US versions were to mount the new Continental AVCR air-cooled V-12 diesel of 1470 hp (1096 kW). German versions originally used a similar Daimler-Benz model, but later moved to an MTU design of 1500 hp (1,100 kW). The MTU unit could be easily swapped out of the tank, along with the drive train, in 15 minutes. Both versions could reach 43 mph (69 km/h) on their engines, at the time an unheard-of speed for such a large tank.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M60_Patton

M60-2000 Main Battle Tank

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:MBT-7 ... 07rb5r.jpg

The General Dynamics 120S (M60-2000) is an upgrade of the M60 Patton tank. The development of the M60-2000 was primarily due to thousands of M60 Main Battle Tanks in service with many nations unable to afford a sufficient force of more modern main battle tanks. General Dynamics Land Systems devised the M60-2000 upgrade, offering many features of the M1A1 Abrams to existing M60 users at a reduced cost.
The M60-2000 was a GDLS supplied conversion kits, including the gun turret and 120 mm (4.72in) smoothbore gun of the M1A1/M1A2, to the M60. The upgrade was marketed at those M60 users with the industrial capability to convert the tanks themselves. Along with a new turret, a new diesel powerpack and the transmission system of the M1 were installed on the M60-2000, and has been tested in a standard M60 chassis


Specifications

(over Gun) 9.55m (31ft 4in)

Width
3.77m (12ft 5in)

Height
2.89m (9ft 6in)

Crew 4 (commander, gunner, loader, driver)

Primary
armament 120 mm M256 Smoothbore Cannon
Secondary
armament 2 x 7.62 (0.3in) MGs and 1 x 12.7mm (0.50in) MG Engine GLDS AVDS-1790-9A V-12 diesel
895.5 kW (1200 hp) Armor Unknown Power/weight
22 hp/tonne
Suspension torsion bar
Operational
range
443 km (275 mi)
Speed 51.6 km/h (33 mph)





Sabra (tank)


The M60T, also known as the Sabra Mk.III, is a highly upgraded version of the M60 Patton MBT which is designed for the main battle tank modernization program of the Turkish Army.
Turkish Army 2nd Main Maintenance Center Command is upgrading the M60A1's with a new modular armour package which is delivered to Turkey in kits by Israeli Military Industries (IMI) with technology transfer. The upgraded version retained the M60 Patton style M19 cupola with its 12.7mm M85 machine gun. This mini-turret and the Commander's Independent Thermal Viewer (CITV) allow the 12.7mm M85 MG to be fired from inside. The modernization program includes the Elbit Systems electric gun and turret drive stabilization mechanism with a new fire control system (built by Aselsan) and a new 120mm MG253 smoothbore gun (built by MKEK). In addition, the upgraded tank is equipped with thermal imaging system, an automatic fire and explosion suppression system, a threat warning system, smoke grenade launchers and a 60 mm mortar system (supplied by Soltam Ltd). The upgrade program also encompasses the Merkava Mk.IV add-on armour technology and explosive reactive armour (ERA), 1000 hp MTU Friedrichshafen diesel engine/transmission, full system modernization and integration capability, a new improved Merkava Mk.IV tracks, RWR/IR warning system and NBC protection.
The prototype was completed and passed the qualification tests in May 2006. Several other prototypes are being tested in Israel and Turkey as part of USD 688 million contract dated 29 March 2002. The M60A1 modernization program is currently in the mass modernization phase. The project will end by April 2009. The remaining M60 tanks are likely to undergo the same upgrade process with more involvement of Turkish companies, upon completion of the upgrade of first 170 tanks.
Israeli military officers described the Sabra upgraded Turkish M60A1 configuration (M60T) as "a totally different tank", with one IDF armour specialist claiming that "in some areas it even almost equals the Israeli Merkava Mk.IV".

Specifications

Height 3.37 m

Crew 4
Armor
Classified, Steel/Laminate armour

Primary
armament

IMI 120 mm MG253 smoothbore gun

Secondary
armament
7.62 mm M240 Coaxial weapon
7.62 mm MG3A1 Machine gun
12.7 mm M85 Machine gun
60 mm internal mortar
Engine MTU 881 KA-501 turbo diesel engine
1000+ HP Power/weight
16.95 hp/ton
Transmission
Renk 304S transmission
Suspension
Independent, trailing arm
Operational
range 450+ km Speed 55+ km/h

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M60_Patton

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Unread postPosted: Mon Jun 15, 2009 10:48 pm
  

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NAe São Paulo (AUL carrier)



NAe[2] São Paulo (A12) is a Clemenceau class aircraft carrier of the Brazilian Navy, formerly the French Foch. It was built in 1957 and was purchased from France in 2000.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... arrier.jpg

characteristics
lass and type: Clemenceau-class aircraft carrier
Displacement: 24,200 tonnes
32,800 tonnes (full load)
Length: 265 metres (870 ft)
Beam: 31.7 metres (104 ft)
Draught: 8.60 metres (28.2 ft)
Propulsion: 6 Indret boilers, 4 steam turbines producing 126,000 hp, 2 propellers Speed: 32 knots (59 km/h) Range: 7,500 nautical miles (13,900 km) at 18 knots Complement: 1,338 men (1,920 including the air group). 984 men if only helicopters are carried. Electronic warfare
and decoys:
DRBV-23B air sentry radar
DRBV-50 low-altitude or surface sentry radar (later replaced by a DRBV-15)
NRBA-50 approach radar
DRBI-10 tri-dimensional air sentry radar
several DRBC-31 fire radar (later DRBC-32C)
DRBN-34 navigation radars
Armament: four 100 mm turrets, two SACP Crotale EDIR systems, five 12.7 mm machine guns, 4 dual Simbad launchers Aircraft carried: about 40 aircraft, a mixture of A-4KU Skyhawks, AS 532 SC Cougars, HB 350 & HB.355 Ecureuils, and SH-3 Sea Kings

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Unread postPosted: Mon Jun 15, 2009 10:50 pm
  

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A-4 Skyhawk


The Douglas A-4 Skyhawk is a carrier-capable ground-attack aircraft designed for the United States Navy and U.S. Marine Corps. The delta winged "Skyhawk", powered by a single turbojet was designed and produced by Douglas Aircraft Company (later McDonnell Douglas). The "Skyhawk" was originally designated the A4D under the US Navy's pre-1962 designation system.
Fifty years after the aircraft's first flight, and having played key roles in the Vietnam War, the Falklands War, and the Yom Kippur War, a few of the nearly 3,000 Skyhawks produced remain in service with several air arms around the world, including active duty on the aircraft carrier of the Brazilian Navy.


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... kyhawk.jpg

General characteristics
• Crew: 1 (2 in TA-4J, TA-4F, OA-4F)
• Length: 40 ft 3 in (12.22 m)
• Wingspan: 26 ft 6 in (8.38 m)
• Height: 15 ft (4.57 m)
• Wing area: 259 ft² (24.15 m²)
• Airfoil: NACA 0008-1.1-25 root, NACA 0005-0.825-50 tip
• Empty weight: 10,450 lb (4,750 kg)
• Loaded weight: 18,300 lb (8,318 kg)
• Max takeoff weight: 24,500 lb (11,136 kg)
• Powerplant: 1× Pratt & Whitney J52-P8A turbojet, 9,300 lbf (10,000+ USMC A-4M and OA-4M) (41 kN)
Performance
• Maximum speed: 585 kn (673 mph, 1,077 km/h)
• Range: 1,700 nmi (2,000 mi, 3,220 km)
• Service ceiling: 42,250 ft (12,880 m)
• Rate of climb: 8,440 ft/min (43 m/s)
• Wing loading: 70.7 lb/ft² (344.4 kg/m²)
• Thrust/weight: 0.51
• g-limit: -3/+8 g
Armament
• Guns: 2 × 20 mm (0.79 in) Colt Mk 12 cannon, 100 rounds/gun
• Missiles: 4 × AIM-9 Sidewinder, AGM-45 Shrike ARM (anti-radiation missile), MBDA Exocet, AGM-65 Maverick ASM (air-to-surface missiles), AGM-62 Walleye glide bomb, AGM-12 Bullpup ASM (air-to-surface missiles) viewtopic.php?f=9&t=102849
• Bombs: 9,900 lb (4,490 kg) on five external hardpoints, Rockeye Mk.20 Cluster Bomb Unit, Rockeye Mk.7/APAM-59 Cluster Bomb Unit, Mk.81 (250 lb/113 kg) and Mk.82 (500 lb/227 kg) general-purpose bombs, various tactical nuclear missiles and bombs, Mk.76 practice bombs

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Unread postPosted: Mon Jun 15, 2009 10:51 pm
  

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Charles de Gaulle (R 91)


Charles de Gaulle (R91) is the only serving French aircraft carrier and is the flagship of the French Navy (Marine Nationale). She is the tenth French aircraft carrier, the first French nuclear-powered surface vessel, and the first and only nuclear-powered carrier built outside of the United States Navy. She is named after French statesman and general Charles de Gaulle.
The ship carries a complement of Dassault Rafale M and E-2C Hawkeye aircraft, as well as modern electronics and Aster missiles. She is the second largest European carrier, after the Admiral Kuznetsov. It is a CATOBAR-type carrier that uses a shorter version of the catapult system as that installed on the US Nimitz class carriers, the 75 m C13-3 steam catapult.


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... aule96.jpg
General characteristics

Class and type: Unique aircraft carrier
Displacement: 38,000 tons empty
42,000 tons full load
Length: 261.5 metres (858 ft)
overall Beam: 64.36 metres (211.2 ft) overall
Draught: 9.43 metres (30.9 ft)
Propulsion: 2 × K15 pressurised water reactors (PWR), 150 MW each
4 × diesel-electric
2 × shafts Speed: 27 knots (50 km/h) Range: Essentially unlimited Endurance: 45 days of food Capacity: 800 commandos, 500 tonnes of ammunitions Complement: Ship's company: 1,350
Air wing: 600 Sensors and
processing systems: DRBJ 11 B tridimensional air search radar
DRBV 26D air search radar
DRBV 15C low altitude air search radar
Arabel target acquisition radar Electronic warfare
and decoys: ARBR 21 Detector
ARBB 33 Countermeasures suite
ARBG2 MAIGRET Interceptor
4 × Sagaie decoys launcher
SLAT (Système de lutte anti-torpille) torpedo countermeasures Armament: 4 × 8 cell SYLVER launchers carrying the MBDA Aster 15 surface to air missile.
2 × 6 cell Sadral launchers carrying Mistral short range missiles
8 × Giat 20F2 20 mm cannons. Aircraft carried: 40 aircraft, including
*Rafale
*Super Étendard
*E-2C Hawkeye
*SA365 Dauphin helicopters

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Unread postPosted: Mon Jun 15, 2009 10:52 pm
  

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ONE THE MOST COSTLY BUT VERY EFFECTIVE AUL SHIPS , UNDER SOVIET NAVY AND CHINA NAVY
THEY WERE KNOW AS "THE SKY PIRATES' EVEN UEG PERSONAL WERE VERY CAREFUL UGE TO A DEADLY REPUTATION IN COMBAT .

Admiral Flota Sovetskovo Soyuza Kuznetsov (Russian: Адмирал флота Советского Союза Кузнецов, (originally named Riga, renamed Leonid Brezhnev then Tbilisi[1]) is an aircraft carrier (heavy aircraft carrying cruiser (TAVKR) in Russian classification) serving as the flagship of the Russian Navy. She was originally commissioned in the Soviet Navy, and was intended to be the lead ship of her class, but the only other ship of her class, Varyag, has never been commissioned and was sold to the People's Republic of China by Ukraine under the condition she would never be refitted for combat.[2] Kuznetsov was named after the Admiral of the Fleet of the Soviet Union Nikolai Gerasimovich Kuznetsov.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... snzov2.jpg

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... ssr_cv.png


General characteristics
Class and type: Admiral Kuznetsov-class aircraft carrier Displacement: 65,000 tons full load Length: 1,005.5 ft (306.5 m) o/a
900 ft (270 m) w/l Beam: 237.2 ft (72.3 m) o/a
125 ft (38 m) w/l Draft: 29.9 ft (9.1 m) Propulsion: Steam turbines, 8 turbo-pressurised boilers, 4 shafts, 200,000 hp (150 MW)
2 × 50,000 hp (37 MW) turbines
9 × 2,011 hp (1,500 kW) turbogenerators
6 × 2,011 hp (1,500 kW) diesel generators
4 × fixed pitch propellers Speed: 32 knots (37 mph; 59 km/h) Range: 3,850 nmi (7,130 km) at 32 kn (37 mph; 59 km/h) Endurance: 45 days Complement: 1,993 (total); 1,960 ship's crew
626 air group
40 flag staff
3,857 rooms Armament: • 8 × AK-630 AA guns (6×30 mm, 6,000 round/min/mount, 24,000 rounds)
• 8 × CADS-N-1 Kashtan CIWS (each 2 × 30 mm Gatling AA plus 16 3K87 Kortik SAM)
• 12 × P-700 Granit SSM
• 18 × 8-cell 3K95 Kinzhal SAM VLS (192 missiles; 1 missile per 3 seconds)
• RBU-12000 UDAV-1 ASW rocket launchers (60 rockets) Aircraft carried: 12-15 × Sukhoi Su-33 fighters
5 × Sukhoi Su-25UTG/UBP aircraft
4 × Kamov Ka-27LD32 helicopters
18 × Kamov Ka-27PLO helicopters
2 × Kamov Ka-27S helicopters

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let your YES be YES and your NO be NO but plz no maybe


Last edited by ZINO on Mon Jun 22, 2009 10:16 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Unread postPosted: Mon Jun 15, 2009 10:54 pm
  

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sorry if put this one twice
ONE OF THE DANGER TO ALL GROUND UNITS AND TO DESTOIRD PILOTS , WHICH MANY ROOKIES LOST THEIR LIFE'S TO THESES PLANES
Sukhoi Su-25



The Sukhoi Su-25 is a single-seat, twin-engine jet aircraft developed in the Soviet Union by the Sukhoi Design Bureau. It was designed to provide close air support for the Soviet Ground Forces. The first prototype made its maiden flight on 22 February 1975. After testing, the aircraft went into series production in 1978 at Tbilisi in the Soviet Republic of Georgia. Russian air and ground forces nicknamed it "Grach" ("Rook"). NATO assigned the new aircraft the reporting name "Frogfoot".
Early variants included the Su-25UB two-seat trainer, the Su-25BM for target-towing, and the Su-25K for export customers. Upgraded variants developed by Sukhoi include the Su-25T and the further improved Su-25TM (also known as Su-39). By year 2007, the Su-25 is the only armoured airplane still in production except the Su-34 whose production just started.[1] It is currently in service with Russia and various other CIS states as well as export customers.
During its more than twenty-five years in service, the Su-25 has seen combat with several air forces. It was heavily involved in the Soviet war in Afghanistan, flying counter-insurgency missions against the Mujahideen. The Iraqi Air Force employed Su-25s against Iran during the 1980–89 Iran–Iraq War. Most of them were later destroyed or fled to Iran in the 1991 Persian Gulf War. In 1993, Abkhazian separatists used Su-25s against Georgians during Abkhazian War.[2] Eight years later, the Macedonian Air Force employed Su-25s against Albanian insurgents in the 2001 Macedonia conflict, and in 2008 Georgia and Russia were both reported to be using Su-25s in the 2008 South Ossetia War.[3]


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... u-25T5.jpg


Wings and fuselage


All versions of the Su-25 have a metal cantilever wing, of moderate sweep and high aspect ratio, and equipped with high-lift devices. The wing consists of two cantilever sections attached to a central torsion box, forming a single unit with the fuselage. The air brakes are housed in separate fairings at the tip of each wing. Each wing has five hardpoints for weapons carriage, with the attachment points mounted on load-bearing ribs and spars.[12] Each wing also features a five-section leading edge slat, a two-section flap, and an aileron.
The flaps are mounted by steel sliders and rollers, attached to brackets on the rear spar. The trapezoidal ailerons are located near the wingtips.[13] The fuselage of the Su-25 has an ellipsoidal section and is of semi-monocoque, stressed-skin construction, arranged as a longitudinal load-bearing framework of longerons, beams and stringers, with a transverse load-bearing assembly of frames.[10] The one-piece horizontal tailplane is attached to the load-bearing frame at two mounting points.[13]

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... _Su-25.png

Specifications (Su-25TM)
Data from Sukhoi Su-25 Frogfoot[1]
General characteristics
• Crew: one pilot
• Length: 15.33 m (50 ft 11)
• Wingspan: 14.36 m (47 ft 1 in)
• Height: 4.80 m (15 ft 9 in)
• Wing area: 30.1 m² (324 ft²)
• Empty weight: 10,740 kg (23,677 lb)
• Loaded weight: 16,990 kg (37,456 lb)
• Max takeoff weight: 20,500 kg (45,194 lb)
• Powerplant: 2× Tumansky R-195 turbojets, 44.18 kN (9,480 lbf) each
Performance
• Maximum speed: 950 km/h (590 mph, Mach 0.82)
• Combat radius: 375 km (235 mi)
• Ferry range: 2,500 km (1,553 mi)
• Service ceiling: 10,000 m (22,200 ft)
• Rate of climb: 58 m/s (11,400 ft/min)
• Wing loading: 584 kg/m² (119 lb/ft²)
• Thrust/weight: 0.51
Armament
• 1 × GSh-30-2 30mm cannon with 250 rounds
• 11 hardpoints for up to 4,400 kg (9,700 lb)
viewtopic.php?f=9&t=102849
of disposable ordnance, including rails for 2 × R-60 (AA-8 'Aphid') or other air-to-air missiles for self-defence and a wide variety of general-purpose bombs, cluster bombs, gun pods, rocket pods, laser-guided bombs, and air-to-surface missiles such as the Kh-25ML

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Last edited by ZINO on Mon Jun 22, 2009 10:18 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Unread postPosted: Mon Jun 15, 2009 10:57 pm
  

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Knight

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Ilyushin Il-102

The Ilyushin Il-102 was an experimental jet powered ground-attack aircraft designed by Ilyushin. This aircraft was never chosen for production, being surpassed by the Su-25, and only a few development prototypes were built.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... 3_95_1.jpg

n 1967, the Soviet Air Forces drew up a specification for a jet powered shturmovik or armoured ground attack aircraft. While Sukhoi designed an all-new single seat aircraft, the Su-25, Ilyushin proposed a modified version of their Il-40 of 1953 under the designation Il-42, which unlike the Sukhoi was a two seat aircraft with a remotely controled rear gun turret. The design was rejected by the Soviet Air Forces, but Ilyushin decided to continue development as a private venture, renaming the programme Il-102.[1]
The Il-102 first prototype flew on 25 September 1982, with a second airframe built for static tests, and carried out 250 test flights until it was grounded in 1984 when the engine life expired.[2]


The Il-102 was a low winged monoplane with moderately swept (30 degrees) wings and powered by two Klimov RD-33I turbofans (non-afterburning versions of the engines that power the Mikoyan MiG-29 fighter. It was highly unusual for its time in having a rear gun turret, something not seen in ground attack aircraft since the World War II Il-2 Shturmovik and Il-10, the Il-102's spiritual ancestors, controlled remotely by a gunner sitting in a cockpit above the trailing edge of the wing. The crew cockpits, engines and fuel tanks were armoured to protect against ground fire.
Although development was abandoned in 1984, the prototype Il-102 was publicly unveiled at the 1992 Mosaeroshow air show at Zhukovsky, being claimed to be available for export.[3]


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... 3_95_4.jpg

Specifications
Data from The Osprey Encyclopedia of Russian Aircraft 1875-1995 [4]
General characteristics
• Crew: 2
• Length: 17.75 m (58 ft 2⅞ in)
• Wingspan: 16.9 m (55 ft 5⅜ in)
• Height: 5.08 m [5] (16 ft 8 in)
• Wing area: 63.5 m² (683.5 ft²)
• Empty weight: 13,000 kg (28,000 lb)
• Loaded weight: 18,000 kg (39,683 lb)
• Max takeoff weight: 22,000 kg (48,500 lb)
• Powerplant: 2× Klimov RD-33I turbofan, 51 kN (11,465 lbf) each
Performance
• Maximum speed: 950 km/h (513 kn, 590 mph)
• Combat radius: 400-500 km (300-378 nmi, 345-435 mi)
• Ferry range: 3,000 km (1,621 nmi, 1,864 mi)
• Wing loading: 283 kg/m² (58.1 lb/ft²)
• Thrust/weight: 0.58
Armament
• Guns:
• 1 × 30mm GSh-30-2 cannon externally mounted under fuselage
• 1 × 23 mm GSh-23L cannon in remotely controlled tail turret ( this weapon caught many jet fighter and even veritech model 0 of guard by UEG personal )
Bombs: 7,200 kg (15,873 lb) external stores in six wing bomb bays and eight external pylons (six under wing and two under fuselage)http://forums.palladium-megaverse.com/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=102849

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Unread postPosted: Mon Jun 15, 2009 11:00 pm
  

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weapon systems to know for the AUL NAVY CARRIERS
AK-630

The AK-630 is a Soviet fully automatic naval six-barreled 30 mm Gatling gun. It is mounted in an enclosed automatic turret and directed by radar and television detection and tracking. The system's primary purpose is defense against anti-ship missiles and other precision guided weapons. However it can also be employed against fixed/rotary wing aircraft, ships and other small craft, coastal targets, and floating mines. The AK-630 was one of the first ever CIWS systems; when it was developed, there were no Phalanx, DARDO or Goalkeeper systems, however, the long development time of the AK-640 partially negated this advantage. Once made operational, this weapon system was rapidly adopted; up to 8 units installed in every new Soviet warship (from mine-hunters to aircraft carriers), with hundreds produced in total. Only the Phalanx was produced in greater numbers, however, Phalanx was not adopted nearly as swiftly: in 1984 there were 220 systems in the USN, with another 150 ordered, with 52 more sold to other countries[1].
It can be described as the Soviet counterpart to the United States Phalanx CIWS.



http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... S_gun.JPEG


Description
The complete weapon system is called A-213-Vympel-A, which comprises the AK-630M Gun Mount, MR-123-02 Fire Control Radar System, and SP-521 Electrical-Optical Tracker. A single MP-123 radar system can simultaneously control two guns, either two 30 mm gun mounts, or two 57 mm gun mounts, or one 30 mm gun and one 57 mm gun. The radar system can engage aerial and surface targets at 4 km and 5 km respectively. The electro-optical system can detect MiG-21 sized aerial target 7 km away while torpedo boat sized surface targets can be detected at 70 km away. Features include surveillance and tracking modes, high jamming immunity, laser range finder and TV optical sight. It is in operation on almost all Russian Navy ships from fast attack boats to the Kirov Battlecruiser.
The gun mount is fully automated, however it can be remotely controlled by an operator from either the control console or via a remotely mounted gunsight. It has a higher firing rate than both the Goalkeeper and Phalanx (Block 1 and older) CIWS systems. Combined with the fact that they are often mounted in pairs, with as many as 4 pairs mounted on the larger ships, providing Russian ships with an effective point defence system. However like all Gatling gun-based CIWS they suffer from short engagement times and the need for multiple volleys to effectively eradicate a threat.

Specifications
• Gun: AO-18 six-barrel 30 mm Gatling gun.
• Weight: (Empty / with ammunition and control system)
o AK-630/630M: 1,850 kg (empty), 1,918 kg (with ammunition), 9,114 kg (with ammunition and control systems)
o AK-630M1-2: 2,500 kg (empty), 11,819 kg (with ammunition and control systems)
o AK-306: 1,100 kg (empty), 1, 630 kg (with ammunition and control systems)
• Elevation: -12 to +88 degrees at 50 degree/s
• Traverse: 360 degrees at 70 degree/s
• Muzzle velocity: 900 m/s (MPDS round).
• Rate of fire: 83 round/s (5000 round/min).
• Ammunition: Fixed (HE-FRAG, FRAG)
• Ammunition Stowage: A single below deck magazine
o AK-630/630M: 2,000 rounds
o AK-630M1-2: 4,000 rounds
o AK-306: 500 rounds
• Weapons range: Effective range with HE-FRAG (0.54 kg) shell, 4,000 m (4,375 yd)
• Search and track systems: A-213-Vympel-A, includes radar, optical, and TV control systems


Tor missile system


The Tor missile system (Russian: "Тор"; English: torus[1]) is an all-weather low to medium altitude, short-range surface-to-air missile system designed for engaging airplanes, helicopters, cruise missiles, precision guided munitions, unmanned aerial vehicles and ballistic targets. Originally developed by the Soviet Union under the GRAU designation 9K330, the system is commonly known by its NATO reporting name, SA-15 "Gauntlet". A navalized variant was developed under the name 3K95 "Kinzhal", also known as the SA-N-9 "Gauntlet". Tor was also the first air defence system in the world designed from the start to shoot down precision guided weapons like the AGM-86 ALCM[2].
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... d_sa15.jpg

Improvements

Even while the Tor was being introduced into service, work started on improving the system, resulting in an enhanced version, the Tor-M1. Many improvements over the original system were made; these included the addition of a second fire control channel, allowing two targets to be engaged at once; as well as upgrades to the optical tracking system and computer equipment. ECM protection and warhead design were also modified, as was the ammunition handling system.[4] State tests, conducted between March and December of 1989, [2] showed that the result was a system which could engage more targets in a shorter time frame with reaction times reduced by over a second and an increased probability of target destruction. The M1 was introduced into service in 1991. [2] Further modifications occurred as a response of insight gained from the 1995 NATO bombing in Bosnia and Herzegovina resulting in the Tor-M1-1, or Tor-M1V, which offered improved network connectivity and ECM functions.[4][2]
Upgrades have continued over the lifetime of the system, with developer Almaz Antey unveiling the newest incarnation of the Tor missile system, the Tor-M2E,[6], at the MAKS Airshow in 2007. The latest variant features improved fire control radar coverage, and four guidance channels, allowing up to four missiles to be guided at any one time. The Tor-M2E also offers the option of a wheeled chassis, as well as a new digital computer system and all weather optical tracking system.[

Specifications (Tor-M1)
Weight 34 tonnes Length 7.5 m Width 3.3 m Height 5.1 m (radar mast unstowed) Crew 3
rimary
armament 9M330, 9M331 Engine V-12 diesel
618 kW Ground clearance 450 mm Operational
range 500 km Speed 65 km/h

he 3K95 "Kinzhal" (Russian: Кинжал – dagger) is the naval version of the Tor missile system developed by Altair and has the NATO reporting name SA-N-9 Gauntlet. Using the same 9M330 missile as the land based version, the system can be mounted on vessels displacing over 800 tonnes and is known to be installed on Admiral Kuznetsov class aircraft carriers, Kirov class multimission cruisers, Udaloy class anti-submarine destroyers and Neustrashimy class frigates.T he naval version of the later Tor-M1 is known as the "Yozh" (Russian: Ёж - hedgehog), while the export version of the Kinzhal is known as "Klinok" (Russian: Клинок - blade).
Stored within rotary VLS modules, the missiles are clustered into launchers comprising of three to six modules (32 (Neustrashimy), 64 (Udaloy) or 192 (Kuznetsov, Kirov) missiles) and mounted flush to the deck. Each module has up to eight missiles stored ready to fire; during firing the missile is cold launched using a gas catapult before the launcher brings the next round to a firing position.[9]
Fire control (FC) is handled by the 3R95 multi-channel FC system, (NATO reporting name Cross Swords), composed of two different radar sets, a G-band target acquisition radar (maximum detection range 45 km/28 mi,[9]) and a K-band target engagement radar, (maximum tracking range 15 km/9 mi[citation needed]) that handles the actual prosecution of a target.
Using two top mounted, mechanically scanned, parabolic target acquisition radars, the fire control system provides a 360 degree field of view, as well as IFF. The target engagement radar is an electronically scanned phased array antenna of the reflection type mounted on the front of the fire control system with a 60 degree field of view.[5] Much like it’s land based sibling, the target engagement radar can track and guide eight missiles on up to four targets at once and is effective to a range of 1.5-12 km and an altitude of 10-6000 m.[9] The system has a reaction time of 8-24 seconds[citation needed], depending on the mode of operation, and is managed by a crew of 13.[9] Additional missile guidance antenna can be seen around the fire control system and the 3K95, like the upgraded Tor launchers, is equipped with a secondary infrared guidance system. The 3R95 can also provide fire control information for the vessels AK-630 close in weapons systems (CIWS) providing a second line of defence should anything penetrate the missile layer.[5]

vertical launching system (VLS) is a type of missile-firing system used aboard the submarines and surface vessels of several navies around the world.
Derived from the launch systems developed for ballistic missiles aboard SSBNs, a VLS forms a scaled-down equivalent for launching cruise missiles such as the Tomahawk and surface-to-air missiles (SAMs) such as the Standard missile. The system enables SSNs (nuclear-powered attack submarines) to carry more weapons in addition to their torpedo tubes. More significantly, VLSs allow both submarines and surface combatants to have more weapons ready for firing at a given time than with other launching systems such as the Mk-13 single-arm and Mk-26 twin-arm launchers, which were fed from behind by a magazine below the main deck on older guided-missile cruisers, destroyers, and frigates, all of which have been removed from service by the USN, or else had their surface-to-air missiles removed (Oliver Hazard Perry-class guided-missile frigates.) The Mk-13 and the Mk-26 remain in service on ships that were sold to other countries such as, Taiwan, Greece, and Poland.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... _Cells.jpg

Name: P-700 (SS-N-19)
Type: Long-range anti-ship cruise missile
Developed: Russia
Weight: 7000 kg
Length: 10 m
Diameter: 0.85 m
Warhead: 750 kg HE (unknown composition, probably RDX or similar) or 500 kt fission-fusion thermonuclear
Guidance: Inertial, active radar with home-on-jam, and Legenda satellite targeting system (believed to be nonfunctional after the fall of the USSR)
G limit: 16
Maximum Mach number: 4.5
Range: 550 - 625 km
Platforms: Kirov CGN, Kuznetsov CVG, Oscar SSGN

Udav-1 anti-submarine system


The UDAV-1 system is a Russian ship-borne Anti-submarine weapon system. The weapon fires a number of different types of rockets, which in addition to attacking submarines provide a multi-layer defence against torpedoes and frogmen. The system operates in conjunction with the ship's sonar.
The system consists of:
• A KT-153 remotely controlled multi-barrel automated rocket launcher with indirect elevation/traverse stabilisation;
• 111SG depth-charge rockets with HE warhead and impact-time fuze to engage underwater targets;
• 111SZ mine-laying rockets with hydroacoustic proximity fuze for remote mining of a water area to make a barrier for incoming torpedoes;
• 111SO decoy rockets to divert homing torpedoes from the surface ship by creating false acoustic target;
• fire control devices;
• an ammunition loading device;
• ground support equipment.

Specifications
• Number of barrels: 10
• Number of rockets (including reloads): 40-60
• Effective range: 3,000 meters
• Effective dept: 600 meters
• Firing modes: single, salvo
• Rocket caliber: 300 mm
• Rocket length: 2,200 mm
• Reaction time: 15 seconds
• Intercept probability (salvo): 0.9 vs. torpedoes, 0.76 vs. homing torpedoes

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Unread postPosted: Mon Jun 15, 2009 11:02 pm
  

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Knight

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Soviet aircraft carrier Varyag
Varyag was to be an Admiral Kuznetsov class multirole aircraft carrier. She was known as Riga[2] when her keel was laid down at Nikolayev South (formerly Shipyard 444) in Nikolayev December 6, 1985,[3] and she was launched December 4, 1988, but she was renamed Varyag (Varangian) in late 1990, after the famous Russian cruiser.
Construction stopped by 1992 with the ship structurally complete but without electronics. Ownership was transferred to Ukraine as the Soviet Union broke up and the ship was laid up unmaintained, then stripped. In early 1998, she lacked engines, a rudder, and much of her operating systems. She was put up for auction.
Currently the ship is being examined and repaired by China's People's Liberation Army Navy (PLAN) after purchasing it at auction[4]. It was widely reported that the ship would become a casino in the Chinese SAR of Macau. This has been proven incorrect as the ship is in a drydock in Dalian and painted PLAN grey. News reports state that the ship is being refitted to be returned to operational status[1][5].
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... ryag01.jpg
General characteristicsClass and type: Admiral Kuznetsov-class aircraft carrier Displacement: 33,000 t (32,000 long tons) currently
53,000 to 55,000 t (52,000 to 54,000 long tons) standard
66,000 to 67,500 t (65,000 to 66,000 long tons) full load Length: 1,000 ft (300 m) o/a
900 ft (270 m) w/l Beam: 240 ft (73 m) o/a
125 ft (38 m) w/l Draft: 36 ft (11 m) Propulsion: Currently no engines are installed
As designed:
Steam turbines, 8 boilers, 4 shafts, 200,000 hp (150 MW)
2 × 50,000 hp (37 MW) turbines
9 × 2,011 hp (1,500 kW) turbogenerators
6 × 2,011 hp (1,500 kW) diesel generators
4 × fixed pitch propellers Speed: 32 knots (37 mph; 59 km/h) Range: 3,850 nmi (7,130 km) at 32 kn (37 mph; 59 km/h) Endurance: 45 days Complement: 1,960 crew
626 air group
40 flag staff
3,857 rooms Armament:
Speculated HQ-9 long-range air defense missile, YJ-91

As designed:
• 8 × AK-630 AA guns (6×30 mm, 6,000 round/min/mount, 24,000 rounds)
• 8 × CADS-N-1 Kashtan CIWS (each 2 × 30 mm Gatling AA plus 16 3K87 Kortik SAM)
• 12 × P-700 Granit SSM
• 18 × 8-cell 3K95 Kinzhal SAM VLS (192 vertical launch missiles; 1 missile per 3 seconds)
• RBU-12000 UDAV-1 ASW rocket launchers (60 rockets) Aircraft carried: speculated Su-33‘Flanker-D’, 2-seated J-10 fighter carrier edition
As designed:
× 26 fixed wing aircraft
× 24 helicopters

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Unread postPosted: Mon Jun 15, 2009 11:05 pm
  

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The Stryker Mobile Gun System is an eight-wheeled armored fighting vehicle mounting a 105 mm tank gun, based on the Canadian LAV III light-armored vehicle. It is in service with the United States[2] and was also being considered for adoption by several other countries, including Canada.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... gCanon.jpg
Following the end of the Cold War some theorists believed that the existing suite of U.S. armored vehicles, designed largely to fight Soviet mechanized forces in Europe, were not well suited to the lower-intensity missions U.S. armed forces would be tasked with. This led to the development of a new armored fighting vehicle designed for lower-intensity combat, rather than large-scale battle.
This wheeled vehicle mounts a tank gun like the 105 mm gun used in the previous generation of NATO tanks, like the M60 Patton, Centurion, and the Leopard. But, while it would take on some of the roles of tanks, it is not a tank replacement. While it is unlikely to encounter another tank on the modern battlefield, its cousin the M1126 ICV has encountered rocket propelled grenades in Iraq.
Because the Mobile Gun System uses the same chassis as other Mowag Piranha derivatives, it would have the same mobility, and could be rescued or salvaged by a Piranha-derived recovery vehicle. But without a radical redesign, it too would require some re-assembly before it could drive into combat, after being delivered by a C-130.[3]
The turrets proposed for these vehicles have been low profile, remotely controlled, and autoloading. The United States Army version mounts a 105 mm M68A1 rifled cannon (M68A1E4), atop a heavier Stryker chassis, dubbed the M1128 Mobile Gun System.
Canada had liquidated about half of its park of Leopard tanks in the early 2000s, with the intention of replacing them with the airmobile Mobile Gun System. The decision was reversed. In fall of 2006 a squadron of Leopards were sent to Afghanistan, and as of the summer of 2007 Canada is in the process of acquiring 100 surplus Leopard 2 main battle tanks for quick deployment.[1]

Specifications
eight 15+ t Length 6.95 m (22.92 ft) Width 2.72 m (8.97 ft) Height 2.64 m (8.72 ft) Crew 3
Armor 14.5 mm resistant[1] Primary
armament 100 mm cannon Secondary use ASC book
armament coaxial 7.62 MG
Coaxial M2 12.7mm MG
Engine Caterpillar 3126 turbo diesel
260 kW (350 hp) Suspension 8×8 wheeled

AMX 10 RC

AMX-10RC is a wheeled tank destroyer built by GIAT. Over 300 are in service in the French Army. 120 additional vehicles were sold to Morocco (108) and Qatar (12).
The AMX-10RC is a wheeled and heavily armed version of the AMX-10P combat vehicle. The AMX-10RC should not be confused with the AMX-10P; both share automotive components but otherwise have completely different battlefield roles. The AMX-10RC is amphibious and has very good mobility. It is usually used for reconnaissance missions in dangerous environments, or for fire support.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... -10-RC.JPG
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... 1744-b.jpg
Specifications
Weight 54.5 tonnes[1] Length 9.87 m (6.88 without gun[1]) Width 3.71 m[1] Height 2.53 m[1] Crew 3[1] (Commander, gunner, driver)
Armour Steel, titanium, NERA Primary
armament 125mm tank gun[1]
40 rounds (1 round ready to fire in the chamber, 22 rounds inside autoloader magazine with additional 18 rounds in the chassis) Secondary
armament 12.7 mm coaxial M2HB machine gun
1,100 rounds
7.62mm machine gun
3,000 rounds Engine 8-cylinder diesel Wärtsilä
1,500 hp[1] (1,100 kW) Power/weight 27.52 hp/tonne[1] Transmission Automatic SESM ESM500 Suspension hydropneumatic Operational
range 550 km[1] Speed 71 km/h (44 mph)[1]
AMX-30

he AMX-30 is a main battle tank designed by GIAT, first delivered to the French Army in 1966. The first five tanks were issued to the 501st Régiment de Chars de Combat (Tank Regiment) in August of that year. The production version of the AMX-30 weighed 36 metric tons (40 short tons), and sacrificed protection for increased mobility. The French believed that it would have required too much armour to protect against the latest anti-tank threats, thereby reducing the tank's maneuverability. Protection, instead, was allotted in terms of speed and the compact dimensions of the vehicle, including a height of 2.28 meters (7.5 ft). The tank's firepower was manifested through its 105-millimeter (4.1 in) cannon, firing an advanced high explosive anti-tank warhead known as the Obus G. The Obus G used an outer shell, separated from the main charge by ball bearings, to allow the round to be spin stabilized by the gun without affecting the warhead inside. Speed was provided by the 720 horsepower (540 kW) HS-110 diesel engine, although the troublesome transmission adversely affected the tank's performance.
Due to the issues caused by the transmission, in 1979 the French Army began to modernize its fleet of tanks to AMX-30B2 standards, which included a new transmission, an improved engine and the introduction of a new fin-stabilized kinetic energy penetrator, amongst other improvements. Production of the AMX-30 also extended to a number of variants, including the AMX-30D armored recovery vehicle, the AMX-30R anti-aircraft gun system, a bridgelayer, the Pluton tactical nuclear missile launcher and a surface to air missile launcher.
It was preceded by two prior post-war French medium tank designs, including the ARL 44. Although the ARL 44 was an interim tank, its replacement tank, the AMX 50, was canceled in the mid-1950s in favor of adopting the M47 Patton tank. In 1956 the French government entered a cooperative development program with Germany and Italy in an effort to design a standardized tank. Although the three nations agreed to a series of specific characteristics that the new tank should have, and both France and Germany began work on distinctive prototypes with the intentions of testing them and combining the best of both, the program failed as Germany decided not to adopt the new French 105-millimeter (4.1 in) tank gun and France declared that it would postpone production until 1965. As a result, both nations decided to adopt tanks based on their own prototypes. The German tank became known as the Leopard 1, while the French prototype became the AMX-30.
As early as 1969, the AMX-30 and variants were ordered by Greece, soon followed by Spain. In the coming years, the AMX-30 would be exported to Saudi Arabia, Venezuela, Qatar, United Arab Emirates, Cyprus and Chile. By the end of production, 3,571 units of AMX-30s and its variants had been manufactured. Both Spain and Venezuela later began extensive modernization programs to extend the life of their vehicles and to bring their tanks up to more modern standards. In the 1991 Gulf War, AMX-30s were deployed by both the French and Qatari armies, and Qatari AMX-30s saw action against Iraqi forces at the Battle of Khafji. However, France and most other nations replaced their AMX-30s with more up-to-date equipment by the end of the 20th century.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... _Storm.jpg
Specifications
Weight 36 metric tons (40 short tons) Length 9.48 meters (31.1 ft) (gun forward) Width 3.1 meters (10 ft) Height 2.28 meters (7.5 ft) Crew 4 (commander, gunner, loader, driver)
Armour 80 millimeters (3.1 in) maximum[1] Primary
armament 105 millimeters (4.1 in) Modèle F1 tank gun Secondary
armament 20 millimeters (0.79 in) autocannon, 7.62 millimeters (0.300 in) machine gun Engine Hispano-Suiza HS-110
680 horsepower (510 kW) Transmission Manual on AMX30; Semi-automatic SESM ENC200 on AMX-30B2 Suspension torsion bar Operational
range 600 kilometers (370 mi) Speed 65 kilometers per hour (40 mph)

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Unread postPosted: Mon Jun 15, 2009 11:07 pm
  

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Knight

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Comment: NEVER QUIT..... I got lucky
T-80

The T-80 is a main battle tank (MBT) designed and manufactured in the former Soviet Union. A development of the T-64, it entered service in 1976 and was the first production tank to be equipped with a gas turbine engine for main propulsion (the Stridsvagn 103 only used a supplementary gas turbine by 1971). The T-80U was last produced in a factory in Omsk, Russia, while the T-80UD and further-developed T-84 continue to be produced in Ukraine. The T-80 and its variants are in service in Belarus, Cyprus, Kazakhstan,[9] Pakistan, Russia, South Korea, and Ukraine. The chief designer of the T-80 was the Russian engineer Nikolay Popov.[10]

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... rsburg.jpg

Specifications (T-80B)

Weight 42.6 tonnes[3] Length 9.651 m[3] length 7.085m [4] Width 3.585 m[3] Height 2.215 m[3] Crew 3

Armour composite armour Primary
armament 125 mm 2A46-2 smoothbore gun,[7] 9M112 Kobra ATGM Secondary
armament 7.62 mm PKT coax MG, 12.7 mm NSVT or PKT antiaircraft MG Engine GTD-1000T multi-fuel gas turbine or option of 3 commercial diesel[3][5]
1,000 hp turbine, 1000 hp conventional turbo diesel [6](750 kW)[3] Power/weight 23.5 hp/tonne Transmission mechanical epicycle train: 7 forward, 1 reverse[4] Suspension torsion bar Ground clearance 0.515 m [6] Fuel capacity 1000 l without external tanks Operational
range 386 km, 456 km turbine, 580 turbo diesel road travel with external jettison fuel drums (T-80)[4][8] Speed 70 km/h (road)[3]

The T-80 was intended as a land warfare superiority main battle tank with the most likely adversary the M1 Abrams and to a lesser extent NATO Leopard 2. In comparison to the heavier, less mobile Abrams, the T-80 has some advantages: at about half the weight of an M1, it is more maneuverable, and presents half to three-quarters of the target area, depending on the aspect. The T-80 has a high armour protection index due to the optimal internal volume, about half of the M1's, but is still roomier than the infamously cramped T-72).
A disadvantage touted by Western analysts is a weakness in urban combat with internally stored ammunition. Ammunition safety appears good — as ammunition is stored in the most protected area, inside the turret basket in the autoloader carousel beneath the crew fighting compartment. Unfortunately, if the tank is penetrated, particularly with mulitiple RPGs, the ammunition can cook off, the magazine explode catastrophically, killing the crew and destroying the tank.
In contrast, most Western tanks such as the M1, store only a small amount of ammunition within the crew compartment. Though this ammunition can also cook off, if the hull is penetrated, superior crew protection is afforded due to storage in specially designed blast-proof cabinet with blow-out panels at the top.
The autoloader speed is from 7.1 seconds to 19.5 s to load the main weapon, depending on the initial position of autoloader carousel.
The carousel is well protected. In examination of destroyed vehicles, the rounds stored externally to the especially those in the fighting compartment, are the culprit for catastrophic ammunition cook-off for this alleged "trademark" poor survivability issue. The problem is exacerbated by the novel semi-combustible charge casings as opposed other non-combustible traditional brass rounds, thus almost no protection from combustion ignited by white-hot metal fragments inside the vehicle in the event of penetration. The hazard is greatly reduced by restricting all ammunition to be carried only in the armoured autoloader although it limits the vehicle to 28 rounds of ammunition (a fully laden T-80 can hold 45 rounds), which may be a disadvantage in high-intensity combat missions but entirely sufficient for rapid, low intensity operations.
Another perceived design flaw is the small angle of depression for the main gun, meaning it is limited in the hull-down positions that the tank can fire from. However, the built-in entrenching blade equipped T-80 can create an excellent capriot in less than 15 minutes. The latest T-80 variant in service, the T-84 Oplot, has an entirely new turret with armoured ammunition compartment, all but eliminating the possibility of catastrophic ammunition cook-off.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... 005-18.jpg

T-64
The T-64 is a Soviet main battle tank, introduced in the early 1960s. It was used solely by the Soviet Army in its front-line divisions and was a more advanced counterpart to the T-62. Although T-62 and the famed T-72 would see much wider use and generally more development, it was the T-64 that formed the basis of more modern Soviet tank designs like the T-80.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... T64_21.jpg

Specifications (T-64A[1])
Weight 38 tonnes Length 9.225 m Width 3.415 m Height 2.172 m Crew 3

Armour 20–450 mm of Glass-reinforced plastic sandwiched between layers of steel Primary
armament D-81T 125 mm smoothbore gun Secondary
armament 7.62 mm PKMT coax machine gun, 12.7 mm NSVT antiaircraft machine gun Engine 5DTF 5-cyl. diesel
700 hp Power/weight 18.4 hp/tonne Suspension Torsion bar Operational
range 500 km, 700 km with external tanks Speed 60.5 km/h

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Unread postPosted: Mon Jun 15, 2009 11:08 pm
  

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T-10

The T-10 (also known as Obyekt 730) was a Soviet heavy tank of the Cold War, the final development of the KV and IS tank series. It was accepted into production in 1952 as the IS-10 (Iosif Stalin, Russian form of Joseph Stalin), but due to the political climate in the wake of Stalin's death in 1953, it was renamed T-10.
The biggest differences from its direct ancestor, the IS-3, were a longer hull, seven pairs of road wheels instead of six, a larger turret mounting a new gun with fume extractor, an improved diesel engine, and increased armour. General performance was similar, although the T-10 could carry more ammunition.
T-10s (like the IS tanks they replaced) were deployed in independent tank regiments belonging to armies, and independent tank battalions belonging to divisions. These independent tank units could be attached to mechanized units, to support infantry operations and perform breakthroughs.


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... 0_tank.jpg
Specifications
weight 52 tonnes Length 7.41 m, 9.87 m over gun Width 3.56 m Height 2.43 m Crew 4

Armour 250 mm Primary
armament 125 mm D-25TA Secondary
armament 2 × 12.7 mm DShKM machine guns Engine 39-l 12-cyl. diesel model V-2-IS
700 hp (522 kW) Power/weight 13 hp/tonne Suspension torsion-bar Operational
range 250 km Speed 42 km/h


9K22 Tunguska

The 2K22 Tunguska (Russian: 2К22 "Тунгуска"; English: Tunguska) is a Russian tracked self-propelled anti-aircraft weapon armed with a surface-to-air gun and missile system. It is designed to provide day and night protection for infantry and tank regiments against low-flying aircraft, helicopters, and cruise missiles in all weather conditions. Its NATO reporting name is SA-19 "Grison".

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/e ... md_2s6.jpg

Specifications (Tunguska-M1)
Weight 34,000 kg Length 7.93 m Width 3.24 m Height 4.01 m or 3.36 m (radar stowed) Crew 4

Primary
armament 8 9M311 (or 3M87), 9M311K, 9M311-1, 9M113-M1 or 57E6 missiles Secondary
armament 2 30 mm 2A38M (1,904 rounds carried) Engine V-46-4 turbocharged V-12 watercooled 4 cycle diesel
780 hp Suspension Hydropneumatic Ground clearance 450 mm Operational
range 500 km Speed 65 km/h

Development of the system started on June 8 1970, at the request of the Soviet Ministry of Defence the KBP Instrument Design Bureau in Tula under the guidance of the appointed Chief Designer AG Shipunov started work on a 30 mm anti-aircraft system as a replacement for the 23 mm ZSU-23-4.[1]
The project which was given the designation "Tunguska" was a response to the observed shortcoming of the ZSU-23-4 (short range and no early warning) and a counter to new ground attack aircraft in development such as the A-10 Thunderbolt II which was designed to have high resistance to 23 mm cannon.[2] Studies were conducted that demonstrated that a 30 mm cannon would require 2-3 times fewer shells to destroy a given target than the 23 mm cannon of the ZSU-23-4, and that firing at a MiG-17 flying at 300 m/s, with an identical mass of 30 mm projectiles would result in a kill probability of 1.5 times greater than with 23 mm projectiles. An increase in the maximum engagement altitude from 2,000 to 4,000 m and increased effectiveness when engaging lightly armoured ground targets were also cited.[3]
The initial requirements set for the system were to achieve twice the performance in terms of range, altitude and combat effectiveness than the ZSU-23-4, additionally the system should have a reaction time no greater than 10 seconds.[1] Due to the similarities in fire control of artillery and missiles it was decided that Tunguska would be a combined gun and missile system.[1] By combining guns and missiles, the system is more effective than the ZSU-23-4, engaging targets at long-range with missiles, and shorter range targets with guns.
In addition to KBP as the primary contractor other members of the Soviet military industrial complex were involved in the project, the chassis were developed at the Minsk tractor factory, the radio equipment at the Ulyanovsk Mechanical Factory Ulyanovsk, guidance and navigational systems by VNII "Signal" and optics were developed by the Leningrad Optical Mechanical Association LOMO.[4]
However development was slowed between 1975 and 1977 after the introduction of the 9K33 Osa missile system, which seemed to fill the same requirement but with greater missile performance. After some considerable debate it was felt that a purely missile based system would not be as effective at dealing with very low flying attack helicopters attacking at short range with no warning as had been proven so successful in the 1973 Arab-Israeli War. Since the reaction time of a gun system is around 8–10 seconds, compared to the reaction time of missile-based system, approximately 30 seconds, development was restarted.[3]
The initial designs were completed in 1973 with pilot production completed in 1976 at the Ulyanovsk Mechanical Factory.[1] System testing and trials were conducted between September 1980 and December 1981 on the Donguzskom range.[1] It was officially accepted into service on 8 September 1982 and the initial version designated 2K22/2S6, with four missiles in the ready to fire position (two on each side). Tunguska entered into limited service from 1984 when the first batteries were delivered to the army.[1]
After a limited production run of the original 9K22, an improved version designated 2K22M/2S6M entered service in 1990.[1] The 2K22M featured several improvements with eight ready to fire missiles (four on each side) as well as modifications to the fire control programs, missiles and the general reliability of the system.
Tunguska underwent further improvement when in 2003 the Russian armed forces accepted the Tunguska-M1 or 2K22M1 into service.[1] The M1 introduced the new 9M311-M1 missile which made a number of changes allowing the 2K22M1 to engage small targets like cruise missiles by replacing the 8 beam laser proximity fuze with a radio fuse. Additional modification afforded greater resistance to IR countermeasures by supplementing the missile tracking flare with a pulsed IR beacon. Other improvements included an increased missile range to 10 km, improved optical tracking and accuracy, improved fire control co-ordination between components of a battery and the command post. Overall the Tunguska-M1 has a combat efficiency 1.3 - 1.5 times greater than the Tunguska-M.[5]
The Tunguska family was until recently a unique and highly competitive weapons system, though in 2007 the Pantsir gun and missile system entered production at KBP,[6] a descendant of the Tunguska the Pantsir system offers even greater performance than its predecessor.

he dual 2A38 twin 30 mm cannons and the later 2A38M were designed by the KBP Instrument Design Bureau and manufactured by the Tulamashzavod Joint Stock Company. The cannons are fired alternatively with a combined rate of fire of between 3,900 and 5,000 rounds per minute (1,950 to 2,500 rpm for each gun), and have a muzzle velocity of 960 m/s.[12] Bursts of between 83 and 250 rounds are fired as determined by the target type, with an engagement range between 0.2 and 4.0 km and to an altitude of 4 km. HE-T and HE-I shells are used and fitted with a A-670 time and impact fuze which includes an arming delay and self destruct mechanism.[8] The cannons can be elevated and depressed to +87 to -10 degrees and as such can be used to engage ground as well as aerial targets. The 2K22 can fire its cannons in two primary modes of operation, radar and optical, in radar mode the target tracking is fully automatic, with the guns aimed using data from the radar. In optical mode the gunner tracks the target through the 1A29 stabilized sight, with the radar providing range data.[10] The 9K22 is reported to have a kill probability of 0.8 with cannon.
The system uses the same 9M311 (NATO: SA-19/SA-N-11) missile family as the naval CIWS Kashtan which can engage targets at a range of 2.4 to 8 km and to an altitude of 3.5 km,[3] the Tunguska-M1 uses the improved 9M311-M1 missile with an increased range of 10 km. The missile has two stages, a large booster stage with four folding fins, which boosts the missile to a velocity of 900 m/s, before falling away.[13] The second stage has four fixed fins, and four steerable control surfaces. The complete missile is around 2.56 meters long with a weight of 57 kg.[3]
Guidance is performed by the gunner who uses the 8 x magnification (8 degree field of view) 1A29 stabilized sight of the Tunguska to track the target and the missile (using a flare or pulsed beacon) is automatically tracked by the optics. The deviation of the missiles compared with the tracked target is used to calculate guidance commands, the tracking radar being used to send radio commands to the missile, making Tunguska a semi-automatic, radio command, with optical line of sight (SACLOS) system.[10] The gunner is initially cued towards the target by the systems search radar. Once the missile is steered to within 5 m of the target, an active laser or radio fuse (9M311-M1) is triggered. The warhead weighs about 9 kg, and is a continuous-rod system, consisting of 600 mm long 6 to 9 mm diameter rods with a flower-like cross section. The cross section ensures the rods break into fragments weighing 2-3 grams. The rods form a complete ring about 5 m from the missile. Outside the rods is a fragmentation layer of steel cubes weighing 2-3 grams.[3] The 9K22 is reported to have a kill probability of 0.6 with missiles (9M311).[3]


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/e ... 2s6fir.jpg
Specifications (9M311)
Weight 57 kg Length 2560 mm
Warhead Continuous-rod and steel cubes Warhead weight 9 kg Detonation
mechanism Laser fuze (Radio fuze 9M311-M1)
Propellant Solid-fuel rocket Operational
range 8 kilometres (5.0 mi) (10 kilometres (6.2 mi) 9M311-M1) Flight altitude 3,500 metres (11,000 ft) Boost time 2 stages: boost to 900m/s, then sustained 600m/s stage to range Speed 900 m/s Guidance
system Radio Command SACLOS Steering
system rocket motor with four steerable control surfaces Accuracy 5 m Launch
platform 2S6 combat vehicle Transport 2F77 transloader

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Unread postPosted: Tue Jun 16, 2009 6:12 pm
  

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Gonna go for any old Soviet-era nuclear submarines, or updated conventional Golf-class boats?
The Germans and several other European nations(as well as Japan) also have some nice conventional submarines...and let's not forget the Chinese...

Of course, the Columbians have their own stealth 'subs'...awash-deck drug boats...At the very least AUL forces could use such radar-evading craft to smuggle arms, operatives, and other contraband, about...

_________________
-------------
"Trouble rather the Tiger in his Lair,
Than the Sage among his Books,
For all the Empires and Kingdoms,
The Armies and Works that you hold Dear,
Are to him but the Playthings of the Moment,
To be turned over with the Flick of a Finger,
And the Turning of a Page"

--------Rudyard Kipling
------------


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Unread postPosted: Tue Jun 16, 2009 8:24 pm
  

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Knight

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taalismn wrote:
Gonna go for any old Soviet-era nuclear submarines, or updated conventional Golf-class boats?
The Germans and several other European nations(as well as Japan) also have some nice conventional submarines...and let's not forget the Chinese...

Of course, the Columbians have their own stealth 'subs'...awash-deck drug boats...At the very least AUL forces could use such radar-evading craft to smuggle arms, operatives, and other contraband, about...

NICE!!!!!!!!!!!!

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Unread postPosted: Fri Jun 19, 2009 11:57 am
  

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Knight

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just done with about 200 pages for conventional mdc vehicles that can used all three eras !!!!!! with pic as well

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Unread postPosted: Fri Jun 19, 2009 5:14 pm
  

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Location: Somewhere between Heaven, Hell, and New England
Been hitting the caffiene kinda hard there, haven't you? 200 pages? :shock:

_________________
-------------
"Trouble rather the Tiger in his Lair,
Than the Sage among his Books,
For all the Empires and Kingdoms,
The Armies and Works that you hold Dear,
Are to him but the Playthings of the Moment,
To be turned over with the Flick of a Finger,
And the Turning of a Page"

--------Rudyard Kipling
------------


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Unread postPosted: Sun Jun 21, 2009 6:48 pm
  

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CH-47 Chinook

The Boeing CH-47 Chinook is a versatile, twin-engine, tandem rotor heavy-lift helicopter. Its top speed of 170 knots (196 mph, 315 km/h) was faster than utility and attack helicopters of the 1960s and even many of today. Its primary roles include troop movement, artillery emplacement and battlefield resupply. It has a wide loading ramp at the rear of the fuselage and three external-cargo hooks.
Chinooks have been sold to 16 nations; the largest users are the U.S. Army and the Royal Air Force, see Boeing Chinook (UK variants). The Chinook is now produced by Boeing Integrated Defense Systems




http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... H-47_2.jpg


Late in 1956 the Department of the Army announced plans to replace the CH-37 Mojave, which was powered by piston engines, with a new, turbine-powered aircraft. A design competition was held and, in September 1958, a joint Army-Air Force source selection board recommended that the Army procure the Vertol medium transport helicopter. However, the necessary funds to proceed with full-scale development were not available and the Army vacillated in its design requirements. Some in the Army felt that the new helicopter should be a light tactical transport aimed at the mission of the old H-21s and H-34s and, consequently, sized for approximately fifteen troops. Another faction believed that the new transport should be much larger to serve as an artillery prime mover and have minimum interior dimensions compatible with the Pershing Missile System. This "sizing" problem was a critical decision.
Vertol began work on a new tandem rotor helicopter designated Vertol Model 107 or V-107 in 1957.[3] In June 1958, the US Army awarded a contract to Vertol for the aircraft under the YHC-1A designation.[4] The YHC-1A was tested by the Army to derive engineering and operational data. Three aircraft were built with a maximum troop capacity of twenty. However, the YHC-1A was considered by most of the Army users to be too heavy for the assault role and too light for the transport role. The decision was made to procure a heavier transport helicopter and at the same time upgrade the Huey as a tactical troop transport. This decision was to determine the pattern of airmobile operations for the next decade. As a consequence, the Army concept of air assault operations differed from the Marines because, among many reasons, the very nature of the equipment demanded different methods of employment.[5] The YHC-1A would be improved and redesignated CH-46 Sea Knight in 1962.




The Army then ordered the larger Model 114/HC-1B. The pre-production Boeing Vertol YCH-1B made its initial hovering flight on September 21, 1961. In 1962 the HC-1B was redesignated the CH-47A under the 1962 United States Tri-Service aircraft designation system. The name "Chinook" alludes to the Chinook people of the Pacific Northwest.
The Chinook is powered by two turboshaft engines, mounted on either side of the helicopter's rear end and connected to the rotors by driveshafts. The counter-rotating rotors eliminate the need for an anti-torque vertical rotor, allowing all power to be used for lift and thrust. If one engine fails, the other can drive both rotors.[6]
The "sizing" of the Chinook was directly related to the growth of the Huey and the Army's tacticians' insistence that initial air assaults be built around the squad. There was a critical stage in the Huey program when the technicians insisted not to go beyond the UH-1B model with Bell; that there should be a new tactical transport "between" the Huey and medium transport helicopter. By resolutely pushing for the Huey and the Chinook, the Army accelerated its airmobility program by years.[7]
A commercial model of the Chinook, the Boeing-Vertol Model 234, is used worldwide for logging, construction, fighting forest fires and supporting petroleum exploration operations. As of December 15, 2006 Columbia Helicopters, Inc. of Aurora, Oregon has purchased the Type Certificate of the Model 234 from Boeing.[8] Currently the company is seeking FAA issuance of a Production Certificate to produce parts with eventual issuance of a Production Certificate to produce aircraft.
The Chinook was also built under license by Elicotteri Meridionali (Agusta) in Italy and Kawasaki in Japan.


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... _CH-47.png

General characteristics
• Crew: 3 (pilot, copilot, flight engineer)
• Capacity: ** 33-55 troops or
o 24 litters and 3 attendants
o 28,000 lb (12,700 kg) cargo
• Length: 98 ft 10 in (30.1 m)
• Rotor diameter: 60 ft 0 in (18.3 m)
• Height: 18 ft 11 in (5.7 m)
• Disc area: 2,800 ft² (260 m²)
• Empty weight: 23,400 lb (10,185 kg)
• Loaded weight: 26,680 lb (12,100 kg)
• Max takeoff weight: 50,000 lb (22,680 kg)
• Powerplant: 2× Lycoming T55-GA-712 turboshaft, 3,750 hp (2,796 kW) each
Performance

• Maximum speed: 170 knots (196 mph, 315 km/h)
• Cruise speed: 130 kt (137 mph, 220 km/h)
• Range: 400 nmi (450 mi, 741 km)
• Ferry range: 1,216 nmi (1,400 mi, 2,252 km[41])
• Service ceiling: 18,500 ft (5,640 m)
• Rate of climb: 1,522 ft/min (10.1 m/s)
• Disc loading: 9.5 lb/ft² (47 kg/m²)
• Power/mass: 0.28 hp/lb (460 W/kg)
Armament
• M134 7.62 mm (0.308 in) minigun, M240 7.62 mm (0.308 in) machine gun
Avionics
• Rockwell CAAS (MH-47G/CH-47F)

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Unread postPosted: Sun Jun 21, 2009 6:49 pm
  

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MH-53 Pave Low


The Sikorsky HH-53 "Super Jolly Green Giant" is a version of the Sikorsky CH-53 Sea Stallion helicopter for long-range combat search and rescue (CSAR) helicopters. It was developed to replace the HH-3 "Jolly Green Giant". The HH-53s were later upgraded as MH-53 Pave Low series. The United States Air Force's MH-53J/M fleet was retired in September 2008.[1]


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... 53_CM2.jpg

The US Air Force ordered HH-53B and HH-53C variants for Search and Rescue units, and developed the MH-53J Pave Low version for Special Operations missions.
The Pave Low's mission is low-level, long-range, undetected penetration into denied areas, day or night, in adverse weather, for infiltration, exfiltration and resupply of special operations forces. Pave Lows often work in conjunction with MC-130H Combat Talon for navigation, communications and combat support,[3] and with MC-130P Combat Shadow for inflight refueling.[4][5]
Although officially known as the Stallion, the large green airframe of the HH-53B earned it the nickname "Super Jolly Green Giant." This name is a reference to the smaller HH-3E "Jolly Green Giant", a stretched variant of the H-3 Sea King, used in the Vietnam War for combat search-and-rescue (CSAR) operations.


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/e ... _night.jpg

General characteristics
• Crew: 6 (two pilots, two flight engineers and two gunners)
• Capacity: 37 troops (55 in alternate configuration)
• Length: 88 ft (28 m)
• Rotor diameter: 72 ft (21.9 m)
• Height: 25 ft (7.6 m)
• Empty weight: 32,000 lb (14,515 kg)
• Max takeoff weight: 46,000 lb (50,000 lb in war time) (21,000 kg)
• Powerplant: 2× T64-GE-100 turboshaft, 4,330 shp (3,230 kW) each
• Rotor system: 6 blades
Performance
• Maximum speed: 170 knots (196 mph, 315 km/h)
• Cruise speed: 150 kt (173 mph, 278 km/h)
• Range: 600 NM (1,100 km)
• Service ceiling: 16,000 ft (4,900 m)
Armament
• Any combination of three 7.62 mm Miniguns or .50 BMG (12.7 mm) machine guns mounted on left and right sides (immediately behind flight deck) and ramp

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Unread postPosted: Sun Jun 21, 2009 6:51 pm
  

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Eurocopter Dauphin


The Eurocopter SA 365/AS365 Dauphin 2 (Dolphin) is a medium-weight multipurpose twin-engine helicopter manufactured by Eurocopter (originally by Aérospatiale).


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... auphin.jpg



Developed from the single-engined Aérospatiale SA 360 Dauphin variant, the SA 365/AS365 Dauphin 2 is one of Eurocopter's most successful designs and is widely used as a corporate transport, airborne law enforcement platform, emergency medical services (EMS) helicopter, electronic news gathering platform, and search & rescue helicopter. One of the distinctive features of the Dauphin is its fenestron tail rotor.
The military version of the Dauphin is the Eurocopter Panther. The Dauphin is also used by the United States Coast Guard under the designation HH/MH-65C Dolphin.
The Dauphin is also manufactured in China under licence as the Z-9 by the Harbin Aircraft Manufacturing Corporation, and subsequently developed as the armed versions WZ-9 and WZ-9A-100.
More than 800 AS365/366/565 versions have been produced or ordered, with the 500th Dauphin (counting all models) having been delivered in 1991. More than 90 EC155s have been delivered.


General characteristics
• Crew: 1 or 2 pilots
• Capacity: 12 passengers
• Length: 13.73 m (45.06 ft)
• Rotor diameter: 11.94 m (39.17 ft)
• Height: 4.06 m (13.32 ft)
• Empty weight: 2,411 kg (5,315 lb)
• Max takeoff weight: 4,300 kg (9,480 lb)
• Powerplant: 2× Turbomeca Arriel 2C turboshafts, 625 kW (838 shp) each
Performance
• Maximum speed: 306 km/h (165 knot, 190 mph)
• Ferry range: 446 NM, 827 km (514 mi)
• Service ceiling: 5,865 m (19,242 ft)
• Rate of climb: 8.9 m/s (1,759 ft/min)

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Unread postPosted: Sun Jun 21, 2009 6:52 pm
  

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AgustaWestland AW109


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... e_2007.jpg

In the late 1960s Agusta designed the A109 as a single-engined commercial helicopter. It was soon realised that a twin-engined design was needed and it was re-designed in 1969 with two Allison 250-C14 turboshaft engines. A projected military version (the A109B) was not developed and the company concentrated on the eight-seat version the A109C. The first of three prototypes first flew on the 4 August 1971. A long protracted development then followed and the first production aircraft was not completed until April 1975. Delivery of production machines started in early 1976. The aircraft soon became a success and was soon used for roles other than as a light transport including as an air ambulance and search-and-rescue. In 1975 Agusta returned again to the possibility of a military version and trials were carried out between 1976 and 1977 with five A109As fitted with Hughes Aircraft TOW missiles. Two military versions were then developed, one for light attack or close support and another for naval operations.
The helicopter is notable for having retractable landing gear, unlike many other similar aircraft.
Fuselages of A109 are made by PZL Świdnik. In June 2006 the 500th fuselage was delivered by this manufacturer, marking 10 years of successful co-operation between the two companies. [1]
The sale of the Agusta A109 to the Belgian armed forces in 1988 gave rise to a bribery scandal when it was alleged the company had given the Belgian Socialists over 50 million Belgian francs to get the sale. This scandal led to the resignation and conviction of NATO Secretary General Willy Claes.



General characteristics
• Crew: 1 or 2 pilots
• Capacity: 7/6 passengers
• Length: 42 ft 9 in (13.04 m)
• Rotor diameter: 36 ft 2 in (11.00 m)
• Height: 11 ft 6 in (3.50 m)
• Empty weight: 3,461 lb (2,000kgs)
• Max takeoff weight: 6,283 lb (2,850 kg- 3,000kg (depending on version))
• Powerplant: 2× Pratt & Whitney Canada 206C or Turbomeca Arrius 2K1 turboshafts, 567 hp or 571 hp (423 kW or 426 kW) each
Performance
• Maximum speed: 177 mph (154 knots, 285 km/h)
• Ferry range: 599 mi (521 NM, 964 km)
• Service ceiling: 19,600 ft (5,974 m)
• Rate of climb: 1,930 ft/min (9.8 m/s)
Armament
(Agusta A109 LUH only)
• Guns: possibilities include 12.7 mm machine gun (250 rounds) in pod, pintle mounted 7.62 mm machine gun, door gunner post 12.7 mm machine gun
• Missiles: possibilities include 2 × TOW missile launchers (2 or 4 missiles each), unguided rockets in pods (2.75 in or 81 mm rockets with 7 or 12 tubes per pod), rocket/machine gun pod (70 mm × 3 rockets and 12.7 mm machine gun (200 rounds))
See also


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... O_A109.png

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Unread postPosted: Sun Jun 21, 2009 6:53 pm
  

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HH-65 Dolphin


The HH-65 Dolphin is a twin-engined, single main rotor, MEDEVAC-capable, Search and Rescue (SAR) helicopter operated by the United States Coast Guard (USCG). It is a variant of the French-built Eurocopter Dauphin.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... 8W-170.jpg

The SA366 G1 Dauphin version was selected by the United States Coast Guard in 1979 as its new short range recovery (SRR) air-sea rescue helicopter, replacing the Sikorsky HH-52A Sea Guard. In total 99 helicopters, optimised for the USCG's search and rescue role tasks and given the designation HH-65A Dolphin, were acquired. The HH-65A is not able to perform water landings.[1] The HH-65 normally carries a crew of four: Pilot, Copilot, Flight Mechanic and Rescue Swimmer.
The Dolphin was manufactured by Aerospatiale Helicopter Corporation in Grand Prairie, Texas (now American Eurocopter). Textron Lycoming (now Honeywell) built the Dolphin's LTS101-750B-2 turboshaft engines in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, and Rockwell Collins manufactured the HH-65's electronic systems in Cedar Rapids, Iowa.[


The HH-65 Dolphin is used for homeland security patrols, cargo, drug interdiction, ice breaking, military readiness, pollution control, and search and rescue missions. The HH-65 is known for its Fenestron tail rotor and its autopilot capabilities, which can complete an unaided approach to the water and bring the aircraft into a stable 50 ft (15 m) hover, or automatically fly search patterns, an ability which allows the crew to engage in other tasks.
In order to comply with U.S. regulations relating to local content (based primarily on the value of individual components of the aircraft), engineering changes were required — notably, the SA365's original Turbomeca Arriel engines were replaced with LTS101-750B-2 powerplants, which at the time represented the cutting edge of turboshaft design. Unfortunately, initial teething problems with this engine worsened as the HH-65's weight grew, resulting in several in-flight loss-of-power events. The USCG funded a program to improve engine reliability, but the resulting LTS101-850 failed to meet expectations.
In 1994, the USCG therefore held a fast-track competition to select a new powerplant, and in March 2004 the Guard announced the selection of the Turbomeca Arriel 2C2-CG, already installed on the EC155. This upgrade began in 2004, and has resulted in a safer and more capable aircraft. These modified HH-65As and HH-65Bs, which also gained new avionics and other enhancements, have been designated as HH-65Cs.

General characteristics
• Crew: 2 pilots and 2 crew
• Length: 44 ft 5 in (13.5 m)
• Rotor diameter: 39 ft 2 in (11.9 m)
• Height: 13 ft 6 in (4.1 m)
• Empty weight: 6,333 lb (2,872 kg)
• Max takeoff weight: 9,480 lb (4,300 kg)
• Powerplant: 1× 2 x Turbomeca Arriel 2C2-CG turboshafts, 934 shp (697 kW)
Performance
• Maximum speed: 160 kt, 184 mph (294 km/h)
• Range: 356 nm, 409 mi (659 km)
• Service ceiling: 15,000 ft (4,573 m)

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Unread postPosted: Sun Jun 21, 2009 6:53 pm
  

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http://cnair.top81.cn/helo/Z-9C1.jpg


The Harbin Z-9 is a Chinese military utility helicopter. It is a license-built version of the French Eurocopter Dauphin, and is manufactured by Harbin Aircraft Manufacturing Corporation. The first Z-9 flew in 1981, and was built in China from components supplied by Aérospatiale, but by the early 1990s the Z-9B was being built from over 70% indigenous Chinese components.[1]
On 16 January 1992, indigenous variant Z-9B was constructed with 70% Chinese-made parts flew successfully. The flight test completed in November 1992, with design certificate being certified later next month. The Z-9B production began in 1993, entering PLA service in 1994.
The Z-9B features 11-blade Fenestron faired-in tail rotor with wider-chord, all-composite blades replacing the 13-blade in AS 365N. As a light tactical troop transport, the Z-9 has the capacity to transport 10 fully armed soldiers.
Generally the Z-9 is identical to the AS 365N Dauphin, though later variants of the Z-9 incorporate more composite materials to increase structural strength and lower radar signature. The helicopter has a four-blade main rotor, with two turboshaft engines mounted side by side on top of the cabin with engine layout identical to the AS 365N. The Z-9 teardrop-shaped body features a tapered boom to the tail fin, with rounded nose and stepped-up cockpit, and retractable gear and all flat bottom.


General characteristics
• Crew: 2 Pilots
• Capacity: 10 armed soldiers
• Payload: 2,038 kg (4,493 lb)
• Length: 13.46 m (without rotors); 13.68 m (with rotors) (44ft 11in)
• Rotor diameter: ()
• Height: 3.47 m (11ft 4in)
• Empty weight: 2,050 kg (4,519 lb)
• Max takeoff weight: 4,100 kg (9,038 lb)
• Powerplant: 2× Turbomeca Arriel-1C1 (produced under licence as WZ-8A) Turboshaft, () each
Performance
• Maximum speed: 315 km/h, 195 mph (170 kt)
• Cruise speed: 285 km/h, 173 mph (150 kt)
• Range: 1,000 km (621 mi)
• Service ceiling: 6,000 m (20,000 ft)
Armament
2 fixed 23 mm cannons on attack variants. Pylon stores for rockets, gun pods, ET52 torpedo, HJ-8 anti-tank missiles, or TY-90 air-to-air missiles.


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... schema.png

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Unread postPosted: Sun Jun 21, 2009 6:54 pm
  

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CH-148 Cyclone


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/e ... ky_H92.jpg

The Sikorsky CH-148 Cyclone is a twin-engine, mult-role shipboard helicopter manufactured by the Sikorsky Aircraft for the Canadian Forces. A variant of the Sikorsky S-92, the CH-148 is designed for shipboard operations and is intended to replace the venerable CH-124 Sea King, which has been in operation since the early 1960s. The helicopter will be operated by the CF Air Command, and will conduct anti-submarine warfare (ASW), surveillance, and search and rescue (SAR) missions from Canadian warships. It will also provide tactical transport for national and international security efforts.[1]



General characteristics
• Crew: 4 (2 pilots, 1 tactical officer, 1 sensor operator)
• Capacity: 6 in mission config, up to 22 in utility config
• Length: 68 ft 6 in (S-92) (20.9 m (S-92))
• Rotor diameter: 58 ft 1 in (S-92) (17.7 m (S-92))
• Height: 15 ft 5 in (S-92) (4.7 m (S-92))
• Disc area: 2,650 ft² (S-92) (246 m² (S-92))
• Max takeoff weight: 28,650 lbs (12,993 Kg)
• Powerplant: 2× General Electric CT7-8A turboshaft, 3,000 shp (2,238 kW) each

General characteristics
• Crew: Minimum 2 pilots
• Length: 60 ft 8.5 in (18.5 m)
• Rotor diameter: 49 ft 0 in (14.94 m)
• Height: 15 ft 6 in (4.72 m)
• Disc area: ft² (m²)
• Empty weight: 9,750 lb (4,422 kg)
• Loaded weight: lb (kg)
• Max takeoff weight: 17,700 lb (8,953 kg)
• Powerplant: 2× General Electric T700 turboshafts, 1,536 hp (kW) each
Performance
• Maximum speed: mph (knots, km/h)
• Combat radius: 370 mi (nm, 595 km)
• Ferry range: mi (nm, km)
• Service ceiling: ft (m)
• Rate of climb: ft/min (m/s)
• Disc loading: lb/ft² (kg/m²)
• Power/mass: hp/lb (W/kg)

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Unread postPosted: Sun Jun 21, 2009 6:55 pm
  

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Mitsubishi SH-60


The Mitsubishi SH-60J is an anti-submarine patrol helicopter for the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF).[1] A modified version of the United States Navy's SH-60B/F Seahawk, it is built under license by Mitsubishi Heavy Industries. The SH-60K is an upgraded version.


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... h_2007.jpg

The JMSDF chose SH-60B Seahawk as the successor of the Mitsubishi HSS-2A/B Sea King. The Japan Defense Agency acquired a S-70B-2 from Sikorsky for study in 1985. The Defense Agency was going to develop LAMPS Mk III for Japan, but it was declined by the United States, and most avionics sets were developed in the Technical Research and Development Institute.[2] The Defense Agency ordered two XSH-60Js from Sikorsky for $27 million. Their first flight was in 31 August and October 1987. They were fitted with Japanese avionics systems and tested by the JMSDF.[3]
The SH-60J is built in Japan under license from Sikorsky. It began deliveries in August 1991 and entered service thereafter. Based on a concept of the JMSDF, HQS-103 Dipping Sonar, HPS-104 Search Radar, and HLR-108 ESM System equipment of the avionics of SH-60B be different.[2] It is a hybrid of SH-60B and SH-60F, except for avionics. The crew includes a pilot, copilot and sensor operator. The copilot can concentrate on the role of Tactical Coordinator with the help of the Automatic Flight Management System and Inertial Navigation system.[4][5]


The SH-60K is an upgraded version of the SH-60J.[6] The SH-60K anti-submarine helicopter which strengthened performance and versatility for the JMSDF. Mitsubishi began development in 1997. The SH-60K has formerly known as SH-60Kai.[7] The Director General of the Defense Agency admitted adoption in March 2005.[8]
Mitsubishi developed new main rotor blade, Ship Landing Assist System, and other systems. Two prototypes SH-60Ks were built by modifying SH-60Js. These prototypes were completed and delivered by June 2002. The SH-60K's cabin was expanded in length by 30 cm (11.8 in) and in height by 15 cm (5.91 in) compared to the SH-60J.[8] By the expansion of the cabin, variations such as anti-submarine warfare (ASW), anti-surface warfare (ASUW), surveillance, transportation and rescue operations were created.[clarification needed] The first production SH-60K was delivered to JMSDF on 10 August 2005.[8] A total of 50 SH-60Ks are being supplied under new production.[7]


General characteristics
• Crew: 3
• Length: 19.8 m (64 ft 10 in)
• Rotor diameter: 16.4 m (54 ft 6 in)
• Height: 5.2 m (16 ft 12 in)
• Max takeoff weight: 9,750 kg (21,495 lb)
• Powerplant: 2× Ishikawa-Harima T700-IHI-401C turboshaft, 1,342 kW (1,800 shp) each
Performance
• Maximum speed: 264.8 km/h (143 kn, 165 mph)
• Range: 584 km (315 nmi, 363 mi)
• Service ceiling: 5,790 m (18,996 ft)
Armament
• 2 × Mark 46 torpedo
• 1 × 7.62 mm (.30 in) Type 74 machine gun

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Unread postPosted: Sun Jun 21, 2009 6:56 pm
  

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HH-60 Jayhawk



The Sikorsky HH-60J Jayhawk is a twin-engine medium-range search and rescue (SAR) helicopter. It is based on the HH-60H Rescue Hawk,[1] which is a special variant of the US Navy's SH-60 Seahawk helicopter. Besides SAR, the HH-60 is used for drug interdiction, cargo lift, and special operations. It was developed for the United States Coast Guard to replace the aging Sikorsky Aircraft HH-3F Pelican in 1986.


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... _HH-60.jpg

The HH-60J Jayhawk development began in 1986 based on the HH-60H Rescue Hawk airframe. The Jayhawks were delivered to the US Coast Guard in the early 1990s. The HH-60J has a radar for search/weather that gives its nose a distinctive look. A forward looking infrared (FLIR) sensor turret can be mounted below its nose. It can carry three 120 US gal (454 L) fuel tanks with two on the port side rack and one on the starboard side rack. The starboard also carries a rescue hoist with a 600 lbf (2.67 kN) capability mounted above the door.[2] The hoist has 200 ft (61.0 m) of cable.
The Jayhawk has a 6,460 lb (2,930 kg) fuel capacity allows it to operate for 6.5 hours within a 300 nmi (556 km) radius.[3] The helicopter is not able to perform water landings as was its amphibious HH-3F Pelican predecessor.[4]
A total of 42 Jayhawks were built by Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation with 35 in operation and another 7 in storage or support roles.[4]
The HH-60Js began an upgrade program to convert them to medium range responder helicopters in January 2007, and will be redesignated as MH-60T. The program, called Deepwater Program will provide a glass cockpit and other upgrades.[5] The MH-60T is modified with an airborne use of force package, including weapons for firing warning and disabling shots, and armor to protect the aircrew from small arms fire.



General characteristics
• Crew: Four (pilot, co-pilot, two flight crew)
• Length: 65 ft (19.8 m)
• Rotor diameter: 54 ft (16.5 m)
• Height: 17 ft (5.2 m)
• Empty weight: 14,500 lb (6,580 kg)
• Max takeoff weight: 21,884 lb (9,926 kg)
• Powerplant: 2× General Electric T700-GE-401C gas turbines, 1,980 hp (1,476 kW) each
Performance
• Maximum speed: 180 knots (205 mph, 333 km/h)
• Cruise speed: 140 knots (160 mph, 260 km/h)
• Range: 700 nautical miles (802 mi, 1,300 km)
• Service ceiling: 5,000 ft hovering (1,520 m)
Armament
2x M240B 7.62x51 mm medium machine guns or 2x Browning M2 12.7x99 mm HMG forward of doors.

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Unread postPosted: Sun Jun 21, 2009 6:57 pm
  

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Sikorsky MH-60G/HH-60G Pave Hawk
The Sikorsky MH-60G/HH-60G Pave Hawk is a twin turboshaft engine helicopter in service with the United States Air Force. It is a derivative of the UH-60 Black Hawk and the US Air Force PAVE electronic systems program. The HH/MH-60 is a member of the Sikorsky S-70 family.
The MH-60G Pave Hawk's primary mission is insertion and recovery of special operations personnel, while the HH-60G Pave Hawk's primary mission is combat search and rescue (CSAR) of downed pilots. Both versions conduct day or night operations into hostile environments. Because of its versatility, the HH-60G may also perform peace-time operations. Such tasks include civil search and rescue, emergency aeromedical evacuation (MEDEVAC), disaster relief, international aid, counter-drug activities and NASA space shuttle support.[2]




http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... 750pix.jpg

In 1981, the U.S. Air Force chose the UH-60A Black Hawk to replace its HH-3E Jolly Green Giant helicopters. After acquiring the UH-60s, the Air Force began upgrading each with an air refueling probe, and additional fuel tanks in the cabin. The machine guns were changed from M60s to 0.50 in (12.7 mm) M218s. These helicopters were referred to as "Credible Hawks" and entered service in 1987.[3]
Afterwards the Credible Hawks and new UH-60As were upgraded and designated MH-60G Pave Hawk. These upgrades were to be done in a two step process. But funding only allowed 16 Credible Hawks to receive the second step equipment. These helicopters were allocated to special operations use. The remaining 82 Credible Hawks received the first step upgrade equipment and were used for combat search and rescue. In 1991, the search and rescue Pave Hawks were redesignated HH-60G.[3][4]
The Pave Hawk is a highly-modified version of the Sikorsky UH-60 Black Hawk.[5] It features an upgraded communications and navigation suite that includes an integrated inertial navigation/global positioning/Doppler navigation systems, satellite communications, secure voice, and Have Quick communications.


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... y_HH60.jpg



General characteristics
• Crew: 4 (2 pilots, flight engineer, gunner)
• Capacity: max. crew 6, 8-12 troops, plus litters and/or other cargo
• Length: 64 ft 10 in (17.1 m)
• Rotor diameter: 53 ft 8 in (14.1 m)
• Height: 16 ft 8 in (5.1 m)
• Empty weight: 16,000 lb (7,260 kg)
• Max takeoff weight: 22,000 lb (9,900 kg)
• Powerplant: 2× two General Electric T700-GE-700/701C free-turbine turboshafts, 1,630 shp (1,220 kW) each
Performance
• Maximum speed: 195 knots (224 mph, 360 km/h)
• Cruise speed: 159 kt (184 mph, 294 km/h)
• Range: 373 mi (internal tanks), or 508 mi (with external tanks) ()
• Service ceiling: 14,000 ft (m)
Armament
• 2x 7.62 mm mini-guns or 2x 0.50 in machine guns
Onboard Systems
• INS/GPS/Doppler navigation
• SATCOM satellite communications
• Secure/anti-jam communications
• PLS range/steering radio to compatible survivor radios
• Automatic flight control
• NVG night vision goggle lighting
• FLIR forward looking infra-red radar
• Color weather radar
• Engine/rotor blade anti-ice system
• Retractable In-flight refueling probe
• Integral rescue hoist
• RWB combat enhancement
• IR infra-red jamming unit
• flare/chaff countermeasure dispensing system

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Unread postPosted: Sun Jun 21, 2009 6:57 pm
  

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SH-60F "Oceanhawk"
The SH-60F is the carrier-based version of the SH-60B, having replaced the SH-3 Sea King as the carrier battle group's primary antisubmarine warfare (ASW) and search and rescue (SAR) aircraft. It hunts submarines with the AQS-13F dipping sonar, and carries just 14 sonobuoys, compared to the SH-60B's 25.
The SH-60F carries the Mk 46 torpedo and a choice of cabin-mounted machine guns, including the M60D, M240, and GAU-16 for defense. Standard crew complement is one pilot, one copilot, one enlisted tactical sensor operator (TSO), and one enlisted acoustic sensor operator (ASO). SH-60F squadrons are designated Helicopter Antisubmarine (HS), but as squadrons shift from the SH-60F to the MH-60S beginning in 2009, they will be redesignated Helicopter Sea Combat (HSC).[8]



General characteristics
• Crew: 3–4
• Capacity: 5 passengers in cabin or slung load of 6,000 lb or internal load of 4,100 lb for -B, -F and -H models and 11 passengers or slung load of 9,000 lb for -S
• Length: 64 ft 8 in (19.75 m)
• Rotor diameter: 53 ft 8 in (16.35 m)
• Height: 17 ft 2 in (5.2 m)
• Disc area: 2,262 ft² (210 m²)
• Empty weight: 15,200 lb (6,895 kg)
• Loaded weight: 17,758 lb (8,055 kg)
• Useful load: 6,684 lb (3,031 kg)
• Max takeoff weight: 21,884 lb (9,927 kg)
• Powerplant: 2× General Electric T700-GE-401C turboshaft, 1,890 shp (1,410 kW) take-off power each
Performance
• Maximum speed: 180 knots (333 km/h, 207 mph)
• Cruise speed: 146 knots
• Range: 450 nmi (834 km) at cruise speed
• Service ceiling: 12,000 ft (3,580 m)
• Rate of climb: 1,650 ft/min (8.38 m/s)
Armament
• Up to three Mark 46 torpedo or Mark 50 torpedo,
• AGM-114 Hellfire missile, 4 Hellfire missiles for SH-60B and HH-60H, 8 Hellfire missiles for MH-60S Block III.
• AGM-119 Penguin missile (being phased out),
• M60 machine gun or, M240 machine gun or GAU-16/A machine gun or GAU-17/A Minigun
• Rapid Airborne Mine Clearance System (RAMICS) using Mk 44 Mod 0 30mm Cannon
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... eahawk.jpg



http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... eahawk.jpg

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Unread postPosted: Sun Jun 21, 2009 7:01 pm
  

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Sikorsky S-67


The Sikorsky S-67 Blackhawk was a private-venture, prototype attack helicopter built in 1970 with Sikorsky Aircraft R&D funds. A tandem, two-seat aircraft designed around the dynamic drive and rotor systems of the Sikorsky S-61, it was designed to serve as an attack helicopter or to transport up to 8 troops into combat.


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... lo-res.jpg

Background
The US Army issued a request for proposals (RFP) for its Advanced Aerial Fire Support System (AAFSS) program on 1 August 1964.[1] Lockheed offered its CL-840 design, a rigid-rotor compound helicopter.[2] Sikorsky submitted the S-66, which featured a "Rotorprop" serving as a tail rotor but during increased speeds would rotate 90° to serve as pusher prop.[3] The S-66 featured short, fixed wings and was powered by a 3,400 shp (2,500 kW) Lycoming T55 turboshaft engine. The design was to have a speed of 200 knots (370 km/h) with the ability for 250 knots (460 km/h) for brief periods.[4]
The Army awarded Lockheed and Sikorsky with contracts for further study on 19 February 1965.[1] On 3 November 1965, the Army announced Lockheed as the winner of the AAFSS program selection. The Army perceived Lockheed's design as less expensive, able to be available earlier, and that it would have less technical risk than Sikorsky's Rotorprop.[1]
[] S-67
When the Armed Aerial Fire Support System program was delayed, Sikorsky offered an armed SH-3 Sea King (Sikorsky S-61) version initially.[3] Then the company developed an intermediate, high-speed, attack aircraft named the Sikorsky S-67 Blackhawk in 1970.[3]
The S-67 featured a five-bladed main rotor and tail rotor. The main rotor was taken from the S-61, but was modified to have a hub fairing, swept main rotor blade tips and a special "alpha-1" linkage which was added to the main rotor controls to increase collective pitch sensitivity and so extend the collective pitch range. The 20° swept main rotor blade tips help to overcome a phenomenon called sub-multiple oscillating track (SMOT) that causes variations in tip track at high Mach numbers.[5][6] These allowed the S-67 to achieve and maintain very high cruise speeds. To reduce drag at high speed, the main wheels were made fully retractable. It had speed brakes on the wing trailing edges that deployed as commanded by the pilot, or automatically at a set airspeed to improve dive speed control and reduce pilot targeting workload during firing runs.
The S-67 was fitted with a moving map display, a hands-on-collective radio tune control, night vision systems, a Tactical Armament Turret (TAT-140) with a 20 mm cannon, 16 130 mm TOWs, and 2.75-inch (70 mm) rockets or Sidewinder air-to-air missiles. The Blackhawk was powered by two General Electric T58-GE-5 1,500 shp engines.





The S-67 Blackhawk, along with the Bell 309 "King Cobra", was put through a series of flight test evaluations in 1972 by the Army.[7] Neither aircraft was selected to replace the AH-56 Cheyenne. Instead, the Army chose to create a new program to select an attack helicopter, which would become the AH-64 Apache several years later.
The S-67 performed a series of aerobatic maneuvers during its various marketing tours, including rolls, split-s, and loops. The S-67 was reputed to be very smooth and responsive, in spite of its size and speed.
Piloted by Sikorsky Test Pilots Kurt Cannon and Byron Graham, the S-67 established two E-1 class world speed records on December 14, 1970 by flying at 216.84 mph (188.4 knots) over a 1.86 mile (3 km) course,[8] and 220.85 mph (191.9 knots) on a 15/25 kilometer course on 19 December 1970.[9] These records stood for 8 years. As part of internal Sikorsky R&D efforts, in 1974 the S-67 Blackhawk had a 3.5-foot (1.1 m) diameter fan-in-fin fitted instead of its original conventional tail rotor. In this configuration it reached a speed of 230 mph (199.9 knots) in a test dive. The original tail rotor and vertical tail fin were re-installed in August 1974.
Fatal crash
The lone S-67 prototype crashed while conducting a low-level aerobatic demonstration at the Farnborough Airshow in September 1974, killing Sikorsky test pilots Kurt Cannon and Stu Craig.[10]
Development work on the S-67 ceased after this accident.[11]
Legacy
The aft fuselage and vertical tail design of the S-67 was used as a basis for the Sikorsky S-72 Rotor Systems Research Aircraft (RSRA), which later became the test bed for the X-Wing Stopped Rotor Program.[citation needed]
The "Blackhawk" name was later assigned by the US Army to the UH-60 Black Hawk Utility Tactical Transport System (UTTAS).


General characteristics
• Crew: 2
• Capacity: 15 troops
• Payload: 8,000 lb (3,600 kg)
• Length: 74 ft 2 in (22.6 m)
• Rotor diameter: 62 ft (18.9 m)
• Height: 15 ft (4.57 m)
• Empty weight: 12,525 lb (5,681 kg)
• Max takeoff weight: 24,272 lb (11,010 kg)
• Powerplant: 2× T58-GE-5 turboshaft engine, 1,500 shp (1,100 kW) each
Performance
• Never exceed speed: 230 mph (370 km/h in dive with ducted fan)
• Maximum speed: 193 mph (311 km/h)
• Range: 220 mi (354 km)
• Service ceiling: 20,000 ft (5,180 m)



http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... -27SP.JPEG


The helicopter was developed for ferrying and anti-submarine warfare. Design work began in 1970 and the first prototype flew in 1973. It was intended to replace the decade-old Kamov Ka-25, and is similar in appearance to its predecessor due to the requirements of fitting in the same hangar space. Like other Kamov military helicopters it has a co-axial rotor, removing the need for a tail rotor.


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... _Ka-27.png


General characteristics
• Crew: 1-3, plus 2-3 specialists
• Length: 11.30 m (37 ft 1 in)
• Rotor diameter: 15.80 m (51 ft 10 in)
• Height: 5.50 m (18 ft 1 in)
• Empty weight: 6,500 kg (14,300 lb)
• Loaded weight: 11,000 kg (24,200 lb)
• Useful load: 4,000 kg (8,800 lb)
• Max takeoff weight: 12,000 kg (26,400 lb)
• Powerplant: 2× Isotov turboshaft engines, 1,660 kW (2,225 shp) each
Performance
• Maximum speed: 270 km/h (145 knots, 166 mph)
• Cruise speed: 205 km/h (110 knots, 126 mph)
• Range: 980 km (530 nm, 605 mi)
• Service ceiling: 5,000 m (16,400 ft)
Armament
Ka-27
• 1 × torpedoes (AT-1M, VTT-1, UMGT-1 Orlan, APR-2 Yastreb) or 36 RGB-NM & RGB-NM-1 sonobouys
Ka-29TB
• 1 × mobile forward firing GShG-7.62 minigun with 1800 rounds,
• 1 × 30 mm 2A42 cannon with 250 rounds (flexible semi-rigid mount, optional/removable with ammunition carried in cabin)
• four external hardpoints for bombs, rockets, gunpods, munitions dispensers, special four round missile launchers for the 9K114 Shturm
• contrary to some reports the internal weapons is not retained and is replaced by an armoured passenger compartment for up to sixteen troops
Avionics
• Radar, MAD or dipping sonar, sonobuoys
der license by Mitsubishi in Japan.

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Unread postPosted: Sun Jun 21, 2009 7:02 pm
  

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Knight

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AH-56 Cheyenne


The AH-56 Cheyenne was a four-bladed, single-engine attack helicopter developed by Lockheed for the United States Army's Advanced Aerial Fire Support System (AAFSS) program to produce the Army's first, dedicated attack helicopter. Lockheed designed the AH-56 utilizing a rigid-rotor and configured the aircraft as a compound helicopter; with low-mounted wings and a tail-mounted thrusting propeller. The compound helicopter design was intended to provide a 212-knot (244 mph, 393 km/h) dash capability in order to serve as an armed escort to the Army's transport helicopters, such as the UH-1 Iroquois. The AH-56 was armed with a 30 mm (1.18 in) cannon in a belly turret and either a 7.62 mm (.308 in) minigun or a 40 mm (1.57 in) grenade launcher in a nose turret. Two hardpoints under each wing were capable of mounting 2.75 inch (70 mm) rocket launchers and TOW missiles. Two additional hardpoints under the fuselage carried external fuel tanks.
In 1966, the Army awarded Lockheed a contract to develop 10 prototypes of the AH-56. Lockheed presented the first prototype to the Army on 3 May 1967, and the first flight of an AH-56 occurred on 21 September 1967. In January 1968, the Army awarded Lockheed a production contract for 375 aircraft, based on flight testing progress. A fatal crash and technical problems affecting performance put the development program behind schedule, resulting in the production contract being canceled on 19 May 1969.[1] Cheyenne development continued in the hope that the helicopter would eventually enter service. On 9 August 1972, the Army canceled the Cheyenne program. Controversy over the Cheyenne's role in combat, as well as the political climate regarding military acquisition programs had caused the Army to amend the service's attack helicopter requirements in favor of a conventional helicopter; viewed as less technical and more survivable.[2] The Army announced a new program for an Advanced Army Helicopter on 17 August 1972.[3]


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... -lc1_b.jpg


Background
Prior to the development of the AH-56, all armed helicopters had been modifications or derivatives from existing aircraft whose design purpose was other than carrying weapons for aerial employment.[4] In 1962, then Secretary of Defense McNamara convened the Howze Board to review Army aviation requirements. The results of the board envisioned an airmobile division that was supported by 90 armed aircraft.[5]
The recommendation of the Howze Board came at the same time the Army was preparing to deploy its first armed escort helicopters to Vietnam, 15 UH-1A Iroquois modified with armament systems capable of mounting machine guns and rockets.[6] In June 1962, Bell Helicopter presented a new helicopter design to Army officials, in the hopes of soliciting funding for further development. The D 255 Iroquois Warrior was envisioned as a purpose-built attack aircraft based on the UH-1B airframe and dynamic components, with a nose-mounted ball turret, a belly-mounted gun pod, and stub wings for mounting rockets or SS-10 anti-armor missiles.[7]
Attack helicopter requirements
In December 1962, Combat Development Command (CDC) drafted a Qualitative Material Requirement (QMR) for an interim, commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) aircraft, with a 140–knot (161 mph, 259 km/h) cruise speed and a 1,500-pound (680 kg) payload. This was seen as an attempt by Army officials, anticipating the potential of the D-255, to acquire an interim aircraft to fill the escort role until the Army could determine the requirements for a dedicated armed helicopter. However, the Secretary of the Army disapproved the interim approach and directed that the Army look for a more advanced system that would dramatically improve over current helicopter designs.[4]
Based on the guidance from the Secretary of the Army, CDC established Qualitative Material Development Objectives (QMDO) for a rotary-wing aircraft with 195-knot (224 mph, 361 km/h) cruise speed, 220-knot (253 mph, 407 km/h) dash speed, and the capability to hover out-of-ground-effect (OGE) at 6,000 feet (1,830 m) on a 95 °F (35 °C) day. The Director of Defense Research and Engineering (DDRE) conditionally approved the changes to the development objectives, pending his review of the proposed program. He also directed the Army to determine whether or not any improvements could be made to the UH-1B in the meantime.[8]
As a result, the Army Material Command (AMC) conducted a study to determine if the development objectives were feasible and also established a Program Manager's office for the Fire-support Aerial System (FAS). AMC recommended to narrow the competition to compound helicopters, as they were considered the only helicopter configuration at the time capable of being developed to meet the objectives. In March 1964, the Secretary of the Army advised DDRE that modification of existing systems would not approach the required performance of the FAS program; the Army would continue using UH-1B aircraft until development of the FAS could proceed.[8]
AAFSS competition
On 26 March 1964, the Army Chief of Staff redesignated the FAS program as the Advanced Aerial Fire Support System (AAFSS). The development objectives document (QMDO) for the AAFSS was approved in April 1964, and on 1 August 1964, the Transportation Research and Engineering Command contacted 148 prospective contractors with a request for proposals (RFP).[9] Bell submitted the D-262, a modification of the D-255, but still a conventional helicopter design. Sikorsky submitted the S-66, which featured a "Rotorprop" serving as a tail rotor but during increased speeds would rotate 90° to serve as pusher prop.[10] Lockheed submitted the CL-840 design, a rigid-rotor compound helicopter with both a pushing propeller and a conventional tail rotor mounted at the end of the tail.[11]
The Army announced Lockheed and Sikorsky as winners of Project Definition Phase contracts on 19 February 1965.[9] Each company developed proposals for their respective designs, establishing three configurations to satisfy both the development objectives and a revised RFP based on a draft requirements document. An evaluation board studied each company's proposal and then submitted its recommendation to a selection authority council on 6 October 1965. On 3 November 1965, the Army announced Lockheed as the winner of the AAFSS program selection. The Army perceived Lockheed's design as less expensive, able to be available earlier, and that it would have less technical risk than Sikorsky's Rotorprop. On 17 December 1965, the Army released the final requirements document. The document added fourteen requirements that were not previously addressed by Lockheed's proposal, including the addition of an aerial rocket armament subsystem.[12]


The Cheyenne's compound helicopter design included a rigid main rotor, low-mounted wings, and a pusher propeller. Thrust was provided by a pusher propeller at the rear of the aircraft. At high speeds, the amount of lift provided by the wings and thrust from the pusher prop, relieved the aerodynamic requirements of the rotor. At such speeds, the rotor produces 20% of the lift but could be adjusted by collective pitch control changes.[37] The Cheyenne achieved speeds over 200 knots (230 mph, 370 km/h), but as a compound helicopter, and was unable to qualify for speed records in helicopter categories.



http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... h56aam.jpg


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... 9_4017.jpg



The Cheyenne had a two-seat tandem cockpit featuring an advanced navigation and fire control suite. The tandem seating placed the pilot in the rear seat and the gunner in the front seat.[38] An unusual feature of the gunner's station was that the entire seat, sighting system and firing controls rotated to keep the gunner facing the same direction as the belly gun turret. The gun-sight afforded the gunner direct viewing from the turret by way of a periscope sight. The pilot had a helmet mounted sight system for aiming the off-axis weapons.[39]
Weapon turrets were mounted at the nose and the middle of aircraft underbelly. The nose turret had a +/- 100° of rotation from centerline and could mount either a 40 mm (1.57 in) grenade launcher or a 7.62 mm (0.308 in) minigun. The belly turret included a 30 mm (1.18 in) automatic cannon with 360° of rotation. Mechanical stops prevented the belly turret from aiming at any part of the helicopter.[40]
Six external hardpoints were located along the bottom of the helicopter, with two under each wing and two on the fuselage under the sponsons. The two inner wing hardpoints could carry pods of 3 TOW missiles. 2.75 in (70 mm) rockets in 7 rocket or 19 rocket launchers could be carried on the four wing hardpoints. The two fuselage mounts were dedicated to carrying external fuel tanks. The wing hardpoints could also be used to carry additional fuel tanks if needed.[40]
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:YAH-5 ... 2_4015.jpg

General characteristics
• Crew: 2 pilots: 1 pilot, 1 copilot/gunner (front seat)
• Length: 54 ft 8 in (16.66 m)
• Rotor diameter: 51 ft 3 in (15.62 m)
• Height: 13 ft 8.5 in (4.18 m)
• Empty weight: 12,215 lb (5,540 kg)
• Loaded weight: 18,300 lb (8,300 kg)
• Max takeoff weight: 25,880 lb (11,740 kg)
• Powerplant: 1× General Electric T64-GE-16 turboshaft, 3,925 shp (2,930 kW)
Performance
• Maximum speed: 212 knots (244 mph, 393 km/h)
• Cruise speed: 195 kn (225 mph, 362 km/h)
• Range: 1,063 nmi (1,225 mi, 1,971 km)
• Service ceiling: 20,000 ft (6,100 m)
• Rate of climb: 3,000 ft/min (15.23 m/s)
Armament
• Guns:
1 × nose turret with either an M129 40 mm (1.57 in) grenade launcher or an XM196 7.62x51 mm machine gun and
1 × belly turret with an XM140 30 mm (1.18 in) cannon
• Hardpoints: 6
• Rockets: 2.75 in (70 mm) FFA rockets
• Missiles: BGM-71 TOW missiles


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... 2_4015.jpg

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Unread postPosted: Sun Jun 21, 2009 7:03 pm
  

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Kamov Ka-50



The Kamov Ka-50 Black Shark (NATO reporting name: "Hokum A") is a single-seat Russian attack helicopter with the distinctive coaxial rotor system of the Kamov design bureau. It was designed in the 1980s and adopted for service in the Russian army in 1995. It is currently manufactured by the Progress company of Arseniev.
During the late 1990s, Kamov and Israeli Air Industries developed a tandem-seat cockpit version, the Kamov Ka-50-2 Erdogan, to compete in Turkey's attack helicopter competition. Kamov also designed another two-seat variant, the Kamov Ka-52 Alligator (NATO reporting name: "Hokum B").[3]

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... 7_8_93.jpg

The Ka-50 is the production version of the V-80Sh-1 prototype. Production of the attack helicopter was ordered by the Soviet Council of Ministers on 14 December 1987. Following initial flight testing and system tests the Council ordered the first batch of helicopters in 1990. The attack helicopter was first described publicly as the "Ka-50" in March 1992 at a symposium in the United Kingdom.[4]
The Ka-50 was designed to be small, fast, and agile to improve survivability and lethality. For minimal weight and size (thus maximal speed and agility) it was -- uniquely among gunships -- to be operated by a single pilot only. Kamov concluded after thorough research of helicopter combat in Afghanistan and other war zones that the typical attack mission phases of low-level approach, pop-up target acquisition, and weapon launch do not simultaneously demand navigation, maneuvering, and weapons operation of the pilot; and thus with well-designed support automation a single pilot can carry out the entire mission alone.[citation needed] However, it is still an unanswered question whether in practice the rank and file of Black Shark pilots would suffer from excess fatigue from this combined workload.
Like other Kamov helicopters, it features Kamov's characteristic contra-rotating co-axial rotor system, which removes the need for the entire tail-rotor assembly and improves the aircraft's aerobatic qualities -- it can perform loops, rolls, and “the funnel” (circle-strafing) where the aircraft maintains a line-of-sight to the target while flying circles of varying altitude, elevation, and airspeed around it. Using two rotors means that a smaller rotor with slower-moving rotor tips can be used compared to a single rotor design. Since the speed of the advancing rotor tip is a primary limitation to the maximum speed of a helicopter, this allows a faster maximum speed than helicopters such as the AH-64. The elimination of the tail rotor is a qualitative advantage because the torque-countering tail rotor can use up to 30% of engine power. Furthermore, the vulnerable boom and rear gearbox are fairly common causes of helicopter losses in combat; the Black Shark's entire transmission presents a comparatively small target to ground fire. Kamov maintains that the co-axial drive assembly is built to survive hits from 23 mm ammunition like the other vital parts of the helicopter.[citation needed] The zero native torque also allows the aircraft to be fairly immune to wind strength and direction, and to have an unsurpassed turn rate in all travel speed envelopes.
The single seat configuration was considered undesirable by NATO. The first two Ka-50 prototypes had false windows painted on them.[5] The "windows" evidently worked as the first western reports of the aircraft were wildly inaccurate. For improved pilot survivability the Ka-50 is fitted with a NPP Zvezda K-37-800 ejection seat, which is a rare feature for a helicopter.[6] Before the rocket in the ejection seat deploys, the rotor blades are blown away by explosive charges in the rotor disc and the canopy is similarly jettisoned.
The first Ka-50 prototype was nicknamed "Werewolf", but Kamov's official name for the type is "Black Shark". As the Soviet Union's collapse vastly reduced military spending before the Ka-50 could go into full-scale production, a relatively small number of these aircraft have been built. Reportedly the Ka-50's development took place in record time, as Kamov had the forethought of placing liaison engineers at major component suppliers and systems subcontractors.
The Ka-50 and its modifications have been chosen as the special forces support helicopter while the Mi-28 has become the main army's gunship. The production of Ka-50 was recommenced in 2006. It was announced in late 2008 that only five more Ka-50s would be produced, and that production would be reconfigured to make exclusively the more adaptable and advanced Ka-52s.[citation needed]
Ka-50-2 Erdogan
In 1997, Israel Aerospace Industries (IAI) in cooperation with the Kamov bureau entered the Ka-50-2 Erdogan in a Turkish design competition for a $4 billion contract for 145 (later changed to 50) combat helicopters. Erdogan is Turkish for "Born Warrior"; incidentally, this is also the name of Turkish PM Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, who was at that time a rising political star in Turkey).
The Ka-50-2 is a tandem cockpit twin-seater variant of the Ka-50 that featured a modern, Israeli-made "glass cockpit" avionics and a turret-mounted side-folding (for landing clearance) 30 mm cannon as opposed to the fixed cannon of the Ka-50. (A similar Italian turret is also offered as a modification to the Ka-50.) The Erdogan beat the Eurocopter and Apache helicopters, but lost to an improved version of AH-1 Cobra. At the end the contract went to the Italian A-129 Mangusta.[2]
Ka-50N and Ka-50Sh
Because of the limited night-time capability of the original Ka-50 "Shkval" TV sighting and targeting system, modified versions of the single-seat Ka-50 were built. They were named Ka-50N ("Nochnoy", rus. "Night") and Ka-50Sh ("Shar", "Sphere" - because of the spherical FLIR turret). Many variants were tried, on some the original "Shkval" was supplemented by a thermal imaging system, while on others - completely replaced by "Samshite" day-and-night system (also used on Ka-52), including French SAGEM or Thomson thermal imagers. None of those have entered mass production so far.




Ka-52 "Alligator"


The Ka-52 is another modification of the basic Ka-50 design. It features a two-place side-by-side cockpit, and is designed to detect targets and redistribute them among supporting Ka-50s. In comparison to the original Ka-50, it has a somewhat "softer" nose profile due to the wider cockpit, reduced cockpit armor, and large nose-mounted radome. Equipment includes radar with two antennas - mast-mounted for aerial targets and nose-mounted for ground targets, and "Samshite" day-and-night TV/thermal sighting system in two spherical turrets (one over the cockpit and second under the nose). The Ka-52 retains the side mounted cannon and six wing mounted hardpoints of the original Ka-50.[7]
Development of Ka-52 was started after 1994 in Russia. Economical and political problems prevented the Ka-52 from going into full scale production. Currently only few of them exist. Serial production of "Ka-52" was started at autumn 2008.[8]



http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... 52_061.jpg


Weapons
The aircraft carries a substantial load of weapons in four external hardpoints under the stub wings plus two on the wingtips, a total of some 2,300 kg depending on the mix.
The main armament are the twelve laser-guided Vikhr anti-tank missiles with a maximum range of some 8 km. The laser guidance is reported to be virtually jam-proof and the system features automatic guidance to target enabling evasive movement immediately after missile launch. The fire control system automatically shares all target information among the four Black Sharks of a typical flight in real time, allowing one helicopter to engage a target spotted by another, and the system can also input target information from ground-based forward scouts with man-portable target designation gear. The integrated 30 mm cannon is semi-rigidly fixed on the helicopter's side, movable only slightly in elevation and azimuth. The aircraft's agility allows the weapon control system to turn the cannon (and the entire helicopter) to point at the target acquired in the pilot's helmet sight about as fast as the cannon turret of the Apache or the Mi-28 turns.[citation needed] The semi-rigid mounting improves the cannon's accuracy, giving the 30 mm a longer practical range and better hit ratio at medium ranges than with a free-turning turret mount.[citation needed]




General characteristics
• Crew: One (for Ka-52: two)
• Length: 13.50 m (44 ft 3 in)
• Rotor diameter: 2x 14.50 m (2x 47 ft 7 in)
• Height: 5.4 m (17 ft 9 in)
• Disc area: 330.3 m² (3,555 ft²)
• Empty weight: 7,800 kg (17,200 lb)
• Loaded weight: 9,800 kg (21,600 lb)
• Max takeoff weight: 10,800 kg (23,810 lb)
• Powerplant: 2× Klimov TV3-117VK turboshafts, 1,660 kW (2,226 shp) each
• For Ka-52:
o Loaded weight: 10,400 kg (22,930 lb)
Performance
• Maximum speed: 390 km/h (204 knots, 242 mph) in dive
• Cruise speed: 270 km/h (146 knots, 168 mph)
• Range: 1,160 km (720 miles)
• Combat radius: 460 km ()
• Service ceiling: 5,500 m (18,000 ft)
• Rate of climb: 10 m/s (1,970 ft/min)
• Disc loading: 30 kg/m² (6 lb/ft²)
• Power/mass: 0.33 kW/kg (0.20 hp/lb)
Armament
• 1x mobile semi-rigid 30 mm Shipunov 2A42 cannon (240 rounds, dual feeding AP or HE-Frag)
• A variety of payloads on the four wing hardpoints, including UPK-23-250 23-mm gun pods (240 rounds each), APU-6 9K121 Vikhr anti-tank missile racks, Vympel R-73 (NATO: AA-11 Archer) air-to-air missiles, S-8 rocket 80 mm and S-13 rocket 122 mm rocket pods, Kh-25 semi-active laser guided tactical air-to-ground missiles, presumably S-25/S-25L high caliber rockets, 4x 250 kg (550 lb) bombs or 2x500kg (1,100 lb) bombs, 500 L (130 US gal) external fuel tanks. Reportedly, twin Igla light air-to-air missile launchers under each wingtip countermeasure pod (total 4 missiles). Maximum total payload 2,000 kg.
• Two pods on the wingtips with flare and chaff countermeasure dispensers, 64 cartridges each (total 128


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... raphic.gif

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Unread postPosted: Sun Jun 21, 2009 7:04 pm
  

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Bell 309


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/e ... ell309.jpg




The AH-1 Cobra was developed in the mid-1960s as an interim gunship for the U.S. Army for use Vietnam. The Cobra shared the proven transmission, rotor system, and the T53 turboshaft engine of the UH-1 "Huey".[1]
By June 1967, the first AH-1G HueyCobras had been delivered. Originally designated as UH-1H, the "A" for attack designation was soon adopted and when the improved UH-1D became the UH-1H, the HueyCobra became the AH-1G.[1] Bell built 1,116 AH-1Gs for the US Army between 1967 and 1973, and the Cobras chalked up over a million operational hours in Vietnam.[1]
The US Army purchased the AH-1G as an "interim type" for the "jungle fighting" role, but the Army's broader concern was the task of protecting Western Europe from the legions of Warsaw Pact armor to the east.[2]
Bell 309
The Army had initiated the Advanced Aerial Fire Support System (AAFSS) program to develop the Lockheed AH-56 Cheyenne for the anti-tank gunship role, but development of the Cheyenne did not go smoothly, and as one writer put it, "the vultures began to gather", with Sikorsky and Bell trying to sell unsolicited alternatives to the Army. The Sikorsky offering was the S-67 Blackhawk, a sleek gunship, which despite the name was no real relation to the later S-70 Black Hawk utility-transport helicopter. The Bell offering was a refined HueyCobra, the Model 309 KingCobra.[2]
Bell announced the KingCobra program in January 1971. Two prototypes were built, one with a P&WC T400-CP-400 Twin Pac dual turboshaft engine system much like that used on the AH-1J, but with a stronger drive train allowing full 1,800 shp (1,340 kW) operation, and the other with a single Lycoming T55-L-7C turboshaft engine with 2,000 shp (1,490 kW).[2]
The twin engine KingCobra first flew on 10 September 1971. It looked much like an AH-1J, except for a longer and distinctive "buzzard beak" nose and a ventral fin like that on the original Model 209 demonstrator.[3] However, there were significant changes that were less noticeable:
• The airframe was strengthened and the tailboom was lengthened,[3] making the KingCobra 3 feet 7 inches (1.1 m) longer than the AH-1G.
• A new rotor was fitted, with forward swept tips and a diameter of 48 feet (14.6 m), compared to 44 feet (13.4 m) for the AH-1G. The new rotor blade improved lift and reduced noise.[3]
• A larger 20 millimeter ammunition drum, derived from the General Dynamics F-111, was fitted, requiring the KingCobra have a deeper fuselage.[4]
• A sensor system for night and bad weather fighting was fitted beneath the extended nose. This Stabilized Multisensor Sight (SMS) was derived from technology developed for the AH-56 Cheyenne, and included a FLIR, an LLTV, a laser rangefinder, and a missile guidance system. The SMS could display imagery on either the gunner's sight or the pilot's head-up display (HUD). The pilot had his own LLTV, mounted in the front of the rotor fairing, to allow him to fly while the gunner hunted for targets.[2]
New avionics were incorporated, including a Litton inertial navigation system (INS) that could store 16 different preprogrammed navigation waypoints; a radar altimeter with a ground warning system; and other improved navigation and communications gear.[2]
The primary weapon of the KingCobra was to be the new wire-guided BGM-71 TOW anti-tank missile, which had proven highly effective in combat test firings in Vietnam from Huey gunships. This weapon could be carried in a pack of four missiles, with one pack under each stub wing for a total of eight missiles. On launch, the TOW trailed out wires to communicate command guidance updates. The missile had two infrared flares on its tail to allow the SMS to track it. All the gunner had to do was keep the target in his sight, and the missile fire control system adjusted its flight appropriately. Both the gunner and the pilot had Sperry Univac helmet-mounted sights to allow them to acquire targets for the KingCobra's missiles and gun.[2]
A long-span "big wing", 13 feet (4 m) wide, was designed for the KingCobra, but apparently never fitted except as a static mockup. The "big wing" was to provide additional fuel and stores carriage capability at the wingtips.[4]
The single-engine KingCobra first flew in January 1972. Other than engine fit, it was almost identical to the twin-engine KingCobra. As it turned out, the single-engine prototype was wrecked in an accident in April, and to complete US Army evaluation the twin-engine KingCobra was modified to the single-engine configuration. The evaluation, which pitted the KingCobra against the Lockheed Cheyenne and Sikorsky S-67 in a competitive fly-off, began in the spring of 1972 and was completed in July. In August, the Army rejected all three to everyone's surprise.[2][5]
Advanced Attack Helicopter
The United States Army issued a request for proposals (RFP) in 1972 for an Advanced Attack Helicopter (AAH). From an initial list of 5 manufacturers, Boeing-Vertol, Bell, Hughes, Lockheed, and Sikorsky, the finalists selected were Hughes Aircraft's Toolco Aircraft Division (later Hughes Helicopters) and Bell.
Based on the Model 309 and AH-1 Cobra, Bell derived a new prototype attack helicopter, the Model 409/YAH-63, for the Army's Advanced Attack Helicopter (AAH) competition.[2][6] Hughes' Model 77/YAH-64 was selected over Bell's Model 409/YAH-63 in 1976.[7]



General characteristics
• Crew: 2: one pilot, one co-pilot/gunner
• Length: 48 ft 0 in (14.63 m)
• Rotor diameter: 48 ft 0 in (14.63 m)
• Height: 13 ft 5 in (4.10 m)
• Empty weight: 6,370 lb (2,890 kg)
• Max takeoff weight: 10,000 lb (4,510 kg)
• Powerplant: 1× Lycoming T55-L-7C turboshaft, 2,000 shp (1,490 kW))
• Alternate powerplant: 1 x Pratt & Whitney Canada T400-CP-400 (PT6T-3 Turbo Twin Pac) turboshaft, 1,800 shp (1,340 kW)[2]
• Rotor systems: 2 blades on main rotor, 2 blades on tail rotor
Performance
• Maximum speed: 178 knots (205 mph, 330 km/h)
• Range: 274 nmi (315 mi, 510 km)
• Service ceiling: 12,200 ft (3,720 m)
• Rate of climb: 1,620 ft/min (8.2 m/s)
Armament
• M197 3-barreled 20 mm "Gatling-style" cannon (750 rounds ammo capacity)
• 2.75 in (70 mm) rockets - 14 rockets mounted in M or M launchers
• TOW Missiles - 4 or 8 missiles mounted in two-missile launchers on each hardpoint


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... h63001.jpg

During the mid-1960s, United States Army initiated the Advanced Aerial Fire Support System (AAFSS) program to develop the Lockheed AH-56 Cheyenne for the anti-tank gunship role. The U.S. Army pursued the AH-1G HueyCobra as an "interim type" for the "jungle fighting" role. However the Army's broader concern was the task of protecting Western Europe from the legions of Warsaw Pact armor to the east.[1]
In 1972, the Army conducted an evaluation between the Bell Model 309 KingCobra, the Lockheed Cheyenne and Sikorsky S-67 in a competitive fly-off, beginning in the spring of 1972 and was completed in July. In August, somewhat to everyone's shock, the Army rejected all three.[2]
Difficulties delayed the AH-56 Cheyenne development. The Army canceled the Cheyenne program in August 1972. Controversy over the Cheyenne's role in combat, as well as the political climate regarding military acquisition programs, had caused the Army to amend the service's attack helicopter requirements in favor of a simpler and more survivable conventional helicopter.[3][4]
Bell 409
The Army sought an aircraft to fill an anti-armor attack role. The Army wanted an aircraft better than the AH-1 Cobra in firepower, performance and range. It would have the maneuverability to fly nap-of-the-earth (NoE) missions. To this end, the U.S. Army issued a request for proposals (RFP) for an Advanced Attack Helicopter (AAH) in 1972.[5][4]
The Army specified that the AAH was to be powered by twin General Electric T700 turboshaft engines with 1,500 shp (1,120 kW ) each, the same powerplant fit specified for a new Army utility helicopter competition that would be won by the Sikorsky S-70 Black Hawk. The AAH would be armed with a 30 millimeter cannon and sixteen TOW anti-tank missiles. The missile armament specification was later modified to include an alternate load of 16 laser-guided AGM-114 Hellfire anti-tank missiles. Hellfire was then in development and promised greater range and lethality than TOW.[2]
Bell, Boeing-Vertol (teamed with Grumman), Hughes, Lockheed, and Sikorsky all submitted proposals for the AAH program. In June 1973, Bell and Hughes were selected as finalists, and were each awarded contracts for the construction of two prototype aircraft.[6]
The Bell entry, the Model 409 (YAH-63), was by no means "just another Cobra design", though it leveraged Cobra technology where possible. Although it had what had become by then the typical configuration for a helicopter gunship, with a sharklike fuselage, tandem crew seating, and stub wings for armament, the YAH-63 was largely a new machine.[2]
Distinctive features included wheeled tricycle landing gear; flat canopy window plates; an unusual "tee" tail; a large ventral fin; and a three-barreled GE XM-188 30 millimeter cannon. One less noticeable feature was that the pilot occupied the front seat instead of the back, the reverse of the AH-1's arrangement. This was felt to be more prudent since the YAH-63 was intended to fly "in the treetops", or what is more formally called "nap of earth (NOE)" operations, and the pilot needed to have a clear view of the surroundings.[2] The YAH-63's rotor mast could be lowered and the landing gear could kneel to reduce height for transport.[7]
The first prototype of the YAH-63 (serial 73-22246)[8] made its initial flight on 1 October 1975. This rotorcraft crashed in June 1976, but a static test prototype was brought up to flight standard and, along with the second prototype (73-22247), entered the flyoff against the Hughes entry, the Model 77 (YAH-64).[2]
The YAH-64 was selected in December 1976, and developed into the production AH-64 Apache version. The Army felt the YAH-63's two-blade rotor was more vulnerable to damage than the Apache's four-bladed rotor, and the service did not like the YAH-63's tricycle landing gear scheme, feeling it was less stable than the Apache's "taildragger" configuration. Some observers also suspected the Army did not want to divert Bell from AH-1 production.[2][9] Bell would use its experience with the T700 engine to develop the AH-1T+ design and later AH-1W equipped with the engine.[10]


General characteristics
• Crew: 2: one pilot, one CPG (co-pilot/gunner)
• Length: 44 ft 7 in (13.6 m)
• Rotor diameter: 48 ft (14.6 m)
• Height: 13 ft 5 in (4.1 m)
• Disc area: 530.83 ft² (168.1 m²)
• Empty weight: 6,600 lb (2,993 kg)
• Max takeoff weight: 14,750 lb (4,500 kg)
• Powerplant: 2× General Electric T700 turboshaft, 1,680 shp (1,300 kW) each
Performance
• Maximum speed: 170 knots (210 mph, 338 km/h)
• Range: 317 nmi (365 mi, 587 km)
• Service ceiling: 12,200 ft (3,720 m)
• Rate of climb: 1,620 ft/min (8.2 m/s)
Armament
• XM188 Gatling gun 3-barreled 30 mm cannon
• 2.75 mm (70 mm) rockets: 14 rockets mounted in M or M launchers
• TOW Missiles: 4 or 8 missiles mounted in two-missile launchers on each hardpoint

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AH-1 SuperCobra


The Bell AH-1 SuperCobra is a twin-engine attack helicopter based on the US Army's AH-1 Cobra. The twin Cobra family includes the AH-1J SeaCobra, the AH-1T Improved SeaCobra, and the AH-1W SuperCobra. The AH-1W is the backbone of the United States Marine Corps's attack helicopter fleet, but will be replaced in service by the AH-1Z Viper upgrade in the next decade.


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... _Cobra.jpg

The AH-1 Cobra was developed in the mid-1960s as an interim gunship for the U.S. Army for use in Vietnam. The Cobra shared the proven transmission, rotor system, and the T53 turboshaft engine of the UH-1 "Huey".[2]
By June 1967, the first AH-1G HueyCobras had been delivered. Bell built 1,116 AH-1Gs for the U.S. Army between 1967 and 1973, and the Cobras chalked up over a million operational hours in Vietnam.[2]
The U.S. Marine Corps was very interested in the AH-1G Cobra, but preferred a twin-engined version for improved safety in over-water operations, and also wanted a more potent turret-mounted weapon. At first, the Department of Defense had balked at providing the Marines with a twin-engined version of the Cobra, in the belief that commonality with Army AH-1Gs outweighed the advantages of a different engine fit. However, the Marines won out and awarded Bell a contract for 49 twin-engined AH-1J SeaCobras in May 1968. As an interim measure, the U.S. Army passed on 38 AH-1Gs to the Marines in 1969.[3] The AH-1J also received a more powerful gun turret. It featured a three barrel 20 mm XM197 cannon that was based on the six barrel M61 Vulcan cannon.[4]

The Marine Corps requested greater load carrying capability in high temperatures for the Cobra in the 1970s. Bell used systems from the Model 309 to develop the AH-1T. This version had a lengthened tailboom and fuselage with an upgraded transmission and engines from the 309. Bell designed the AH-1T to be more reliable and easier to maintain in the field. The version was given full TOW capability with targeting system and other sensors. An advanced version, known as the AH-1T+ with more powerful T700-GE-700 engines and advanced avionics was proposed to Iran in the late 1970s, but the overthrow of the Shah of Iran resulted in the sale being canceled.[4]
In the early 1980s, the U.S. Marine Corps sought a new navalized helicopter, but was denied funding to buy the AH-64 Apache by Congress in 1981. The Marines in turn pursued a more powerful version of the AH-1T. Other changes included modified fire control systems to carry and fire AIM-9 Sidewinder and AGM-114 Hellfire missiles. The new version was funded by Congress and received the AH-1W designation.[4] At least 266 were delivered.
The AH-1T+ demonstrator and AH-1W prototype was later tested with a new experimental composite four blade main rotor system. The new system offered better performance, reduced noise and improved battle damage tolerance. Lacking a USMC contract, Bell developed this new design into the AH-1Z with its own funds. By 1996, the Marines were again not allowed to order the AH-64.[4] Developing a marine version of the Apache would have been expensive and it was likely that the Marine Corps would be its only customer.[2] They instead signed a contract for upgrading 180 AH-1Ws into AH-1Zs.[4]
The AH-1Z Viper features several design changes. The AH-1Z's two redesigned wing stubs are longer with each adding a wing-tip station for a missile such as the AIM-9 Sidewinder. Each wing has two other stations for 70 mm (2.75 in) Hydra rocket pods, or AGM-114 Hellfire quad missile launcher. The Longbow radar can be mounted on a wing tip station.[2

During the closing months of the United States' involvement in the Vietnam war, the Marine Corps embarked the AH-1J SeaCobra assigned to HMA-369 (now HMLA-369) in USS Cleveland (LPD-7), and later USS Dubuque (LPD-8) for sea-based interdiction of the Ho Chi Minh Trail in North Vietnam in the vicinity of Hon La (Tiger) Island. These were termed Marine Hunter-Killer (MARHUK) Operations and lasted from June to December 1972.[5]
Marine Cobras took part in the invasion of Grenada, during Operation Urgent Fury in 1983, flying close-support and helicopter escort missions. Two Marine AH-1Ts were shot down and three crewmen killed. USMC Cobras participated in the Persian Gulf escort operations in the late 1980s, and sank three Iranian patrol boats while losing a single AH-1T to Iranian anti-aircraft fire. USMC Cobras from the USS SAIPAN flew "top cover" during an evacuation of American and other foreign nationals from Liberia in 1990.
During the 1983 Marine multinational force operations off the coast of Beirut, Lebanon during that nations civil war the AH-1 was deployed. Faced with the possibility of a threat involving the suicide delivery of airborne explosives loaded on light civil aircraft, the AH-1s were employed armed with sidewinder missiles and guns on a ready-alert status as an air defense asset in the absence of carrier based fixed wing cover or STOVL fighters.[6]
During Operation Desert Shield in 1990, and Operation Desert Storm in Jan-Feb 1991, Cobras and SeaCobras deployed to Iraq in a support role. A total of 78 Marine SeaCobras flew 1,273 sorties[7] with no combat losses. Three AH-1s were lost in accidents during combat operations and afterwards. Marine AH-1Ws destroyed 97 tanks, 104 armored personal carriers and vehicles, and two anti-aircraft artillery sites during the 100-hour ground campaign.[4]
Iranian AH-1J SeaCobras participated in air combat with Iraqi Mi-24s on several separate occasions during the Iran–Iraq War. The results of these engagements are disputed. One document cited that "Iranian AH-1Js engaged Iraqi MI-8 Hip and MI-24 Hind helicopters.[8] Unclassified sources report that the Iranian AH-1 pilots achieved a 10:1 kill ratio over the Iraqi helicopter pilots during these engagements (1:5). Additionally, Iranian AH-1 and Iraqi fixed wing aircraft engagements also occurred. Others claim that in the entire eight-year conflict, ten Iranian AH-1Js were lost in combat, compared to six Iraqi Mi-24. The skirmishes are described as fairly evenly matched in another source.[9] Iranian AH-1Js are still operating today and have undergone indigenous upgrade programs. In 1988, two Soviet MiG-23s shot down a pair of Iranian AH-1Js[10] that had strayed into western Afghan airspace.
Marine Cobras provided support for the US humanitarian intervention in Somalia, during Operation Restore Hope in 1992-1993. They were also employed during the US invasion of Haiti in 1994. USMC Cobras were used in US military interventions in the former Yugoslavia in the 1990s, and assisted in the rescue of USAF Captain Scott O'Grady, after his F-16 was shot down by a SAM in June 1995.
The Turkish Army has been using its AH-1 gunships for their operations against rebel Kurds on both sides of the Iraqi border.[citation needed][clarification needed (which Cobra models)]
AH-1 Cobras continue to operate with the U.S. Marine Corps. USMC Cobras were also used in operations throughout the 1990s.[4] USMC Cobras have also served in Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan and in Operation Iraqi Freedom in the ongoing conflict in Iraq. While new replacement aircraft were considered as an alternative to major upgrades of the AH-1 fleet, Marine Corps studies showed that an upgrade was the most affordable, most supportable and most effective solution for the Marine Corps light attack helicopter mission


AH-1J SeaCobra
Data from Aviation Enthusiast Corner[16]
General characteristics
• Crew: 2: pilot, CPG (co-pilot/gunner)
• Length: 44 ft 3 in (13.5 m)
• Rotor diameter: 43 ft 11 in (13.4 m)
• Height: 13 ft 5 in (4.1 m)
• Empty weight: 6,595 lb (2,998 kg)
• Max takeoff weight: 9,979 lb (4,525 kg)
• Powerplant: 1× Pratt & Whitney Canada T400-CP-400 (PT6T-3 Twin-Pac) turboshaft, 1,800 shp (1,342 kW)
• Total engine output: 1,530 shp (1,125 kW) limited by helicopter drivetrain[4]
• Rotor systems: 2 blades on main rotor, 2 blades on tail rotor
Performance
• Maximum speed: 190 knots (218 mph, 352 km/h)
• Range: 308 nmi (355 mi, 571 km)
• Service ceiling: 11,398 ft (3,475 m)
Armament
• M197 3-barreled 20 mm "Gatling-style" cannon in the M97 turret (750 rounds ammo capacity)
• 2.75 in (70 mm) Mk 40 or Hydra 70 rockets - 14 rockets mounted in a variety of launchers
• 5 in (127 mm) Zuni rockets - 8 rockets in two 4-round LAU-10D/A launchers
• AIM-9 Sidewinder Anti-Aircraft Missiles - 1 mounted on each hardpoint

AH-1W SuperCobra

General characteristics
• Crew: 2: pilot, CPG (co-pilot/gunner)
• Length: 44 ft 7 in (13.6 m)
• Rotor diameter: 48 ft (14.6 m)
• Height: 13 ft 5 in (4.1 m)
• Disc area: 530.83 ft² (168.1 m²)
• Empty weight: 10,920 lb (4,953 kg)
• Max takeoff weight: 14,750 lb (6,690 kg)
• Powerplant: 2× General Electric T700 turboshaft, 1,680 shp (1,300 kW) each
• Rotor systems: 2 blades on main rotor, 2 blades on tail rotor
Performance
• Maximum speed: 190 knots (218 mph, 352 km/h)
• Range: 317 nmi (365 mi, 587 km)
• Service ceiling: 12,200 ft (3,720 m)
• Rate of climb: 1,620 ft/min (8.2 m/s)
Armament
• M197 3-barreled 20 mm "Gatling-style" cannon in the A/A49E-7 turret (750 rounds ammo capacity)
• 2.75 in (70 mm) Hydra 70 rockets - Mounted in LAU-68C/A (7 shot) or LAU-61D/A (19 shot) launchers
• 5 in (127 mm) Zuni rockets - 8 rockets in two 4-round LAU-10D/A launchers
• TOW Missiles - Up to 8 missiles mounted in two-missile launchers on each hardpoint
• AGM-114 Hellfire Missiles - Up to 8 missiles mounted in two 4-round M272 missile launchers, one on each outboard hardpoint
• AIM-9 Sidewinder Anti-Aircraft Missiles - 1 mounted on each outboard hardpoint (total of 2)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AH-1_SuperCobra

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/UH-1_Iroquois#Operators
34
AH-1 SuperCobra




The Bell AH-1 SuperCobra is a twin-engine attack helicopter based on the US Army's AH-1 Cobra. The twin Cobra family includes the AH-1J SeaCobra, the AH-1T Improved SeaCobra, and the AH-1W SuperCobra. The AH-1W is the backbone of the United States Marine Corps's attack helicopter fleet, but will be replaced in service by the AH-1Z Viper upgrade in the next decade

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... _Cobra.jpg

The AH-1 Cobra was developed in the mid-1960s as an interim gunship for the U.S. Army for use in Vietnam. The Cobra shared the proven transmission, rotor system, and the T53 turboshaft engine of the UH-1 "Huey".[2]
By June 1967, the first AH-1G HueyCobras had been delivered. Bell built 1,116 AH-1Gs for the U.S. Army between 1967 and 1973, and the Cobras chalked up over a million operational hours in Vietnam.[2]
The U.S. Marine Corps was very interested in the AH-1G Cobra, but preferred a twin-engined version for improved safety in over-water operations, and also wanted a more potent turret-mounted weapon. At first, the Department of Defense had balked at providing the Marines with a twin-engined version of the Cobra, in the belief that commonality with Army AH-1Gs outweighed the advantages of a different engine fit. However, the Marines won out and awarded Bell a contract for 49 twin-engined AH-1J SeaCobras in May 1968. As an interim measure, the U.S. Army passed on 38 AH-1Gs to the Marines in 1969.[3] The AH-1J also received a more powerful gun turret. It featured a three barrel 20 mm XM197 cannon that was based on the six barrel M61 Vulcan cannon.[4]


The Marine Corps requested greater load carrying capability in high temperatures for the Cobra in the 1970s. Bell used systems from the Model 309 to develop the AH-1T. This version had a lengthened tailboom and fuselage with an upgraded transmission and engines from the 309. Bell designed the AH-1T to be more reliable and easier to maintain in the field. The version was given full TOW capability with targeting system and other sensors. An advanced version, known as the AH-1T+ with more powerful T700-GE-700 engines and advanced avionics was proposed to Iran in the late 1970s, but the overthrow of the Shah of Iran resulted in the sale being canceled.[4]
In the early 1980s, the U.S. Marine Corps sought a new navalized helicopter, but was denied funding to buy the AH-64 Apache by Congress in 1981. The Marines in turn pursued a more powerful version of the AH-1T. Other changes included modified fire control systems to carry and fire AIM-9 Sidewinder and AGM-114 Hellfire missiles. The new version was funded by Congress and received the AH-1W designation.[4] At least 266 were delivered.
The AH-1T+ demonstrator and AH-1W prototype was later tested with a new experimental composite four blade main rotor system. The new system offered better performance, reduced noise and improved battle damage tolerance. Lacking a USMC contract, Bell developed this new design into the AH-1Z with its own funds. By 1996, the Marines were again not allowed to order the AH-64.[4] Developing a marine version of the Apache would have been expensive and it was likely that the Marine Corps would be its only customer.[2] They instead signed a contract for upgrading 180 AH-1Ws into AH-1Zs.[4]
The AH-1Z Viper features several design changes. The AH-1Z's two redesigned wing stubs are longer with each adding a wing-tip station for a missile such as the AIM-9 Sidewinder. Each wing has two other stations for 70 mm (2.75 in) Hydra rocket pods, or AGM-114 Hellfire quad missile launcher. The Longbow radar can be mounted on a wing tip station.[2]


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... H-1J-1.jpg

AH-1J SeaCobra
Data from Aviation Enthusiast Corner[16]
General characteristics
• Crew: 2: pilot, CPG (co-pilot/gunner)
• Length: 44 ft 3 in (13.5 m)
• Rotor diameter: 43 ft 11 in (13.4 m)
• Height: 13 ft 5 in (4.1 m)
• Empty weight: 6,595 lb (2,998 kg)
• Max takeoff weight: 9,979 lb (4,525 kg)
• Powerplant: 1× Pratt & Whitney Canada T400-CP-400 (PT6T-3 Twin-Pac) turboshaft, 1,800 shp (1,342 kW)
• Total engine output: 1,530 shp (1,125 kW) limited by helicopter drivetrain[4]
• Rotor systems: 2 blades on main rotor, 2 blades on tail rotor
Performance
• Maximum speed: 190 knots (218 mph, 352 km/h)
• Range: 308 nmi (355 mi, 571 km)
• Service ceiling: 11,398 ft (3,475 m)
Armament
• M197 3-barreled 20 mm "Gatling-style" cannon in the M97 turret (750 rounds ammo capacity)
• 2.75 in (70 mm) Mk 40 or Hydra 70 rockets - 14 rockets mounted in a variety of launchers
• 5 in (127 mm) Zuni rockets - 8 rockets in two 4-round LAU-10D/A launchers
• AIM-9 Sidewinder Anti-Aircraft Missiles - 1 mounted on each hardpoint
AH-1W SuperCobra


General characteristics
• Crew: 2: pilot, CPG (co-pilot/gunner)
• Length: 44 ft 7 in (13.6 m)
• Rotor diameter: 48 ft (14.6 m)
• Height: 13 ft 5 in (4.1 m)
• Disc area: 530.83 ft² (168.1 m²)
• Empty weight: 10,920 lb (4,953 kg)
• Max takeoff weight: 14,750 lb (6,690 kg)
• Powerplant: 2× General Electric T700 turboshaft, 1,680 shp (1,300 kW) each
• Rotor systems: 2 blades on main rotor, 2 blades on tail rotor
Performance
• Maximum speed: 190 knots (218 mph, 352 km/h)
• Range: 317 nmi (365 mi, 587 km)
• Service ceiling: 12,200 ft (3,720 m)
• Rate of climb: 1,620 ft/min (8.2 m/s)
Armament
• M197 3-barreled 20 mm "Gatling-style" cannon in the A/A49E-7 turret (750 rounds ammo capacity)
• 2.75 in (70 mm) Hydra 70 rockets - Mounted in LAU-68C/A (7 shot) or LAU-61D/A (19 shot) launchers
• 5 in (127 mm) Zuni rockets - 8 rockets in two 4-round LAU-10D/A launchers
• TOW Missiles - Up to 8 missiles mounted in two-missile launchers on each hardpoint
• AGM-114 Hellfire Missiles - Up to 8 missiles mounted in two 4-round M272 missile launchers, one on each outboard hardpoint
• AIM-9 Sidewinder Anti-Aircraft Missiles - 1 mounted on each outboard hardpoint (total of 2)


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... ront_2.jpg



AH-1 Cobra


The AH-1 Cobra (company designation: Bell 209) is a two-bladed, single engine attack helicopter manufactured by Bell. It shares a common engine, transmission and rotor system with the older UH-1 Iroquois. The AH-1 is also sometimes referred to as the HueyCobra or Snake.
The AH-1 was the backbone of the United States Army's attack helicopter fleet, but has been replaced by the AH-64 Apache in Army service. Upgraded versions continue to fly with several other users. The AH-1 twin engine versions remain in service with United States Marine Corps as the service's primary attack helicopter


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/e ... copter.jpg



Background
Closely related with the development of the Bell AH-1 is the story of the Bell UH-1 Iroquois — predecessor of the modern helicopter, icon of the Vietnam War and still one of the most numerous helicopter types in service today.
The UH-1 made the theory of air cavalry practical, as the new tactics called for US forces to be highly mobile across a wide area. Unlike before, they would not stand and fight long battles, and they would not stay and hold positions. Instead, the plan was that the troops carried by fleets of UH-1 Hueys would range across the country, to fight the enemy at times and places of their own choice.[2]
It soon became clear that the unarmed troop helicopters were vulnerable against ground fire from Việt Cộng and North Vietnamese troops, particularly as they came down to drop their troops in a landing zone. Without friendly support from artillery or ground forces, the only way to pacify a landing zone was from the air, preferably with a machine that could closely escort the transport helicopters, and loiter over the landing zone as the battle progressed. By 1962 a small number of armed UH-1As were used as escorts, armed with multiple machine guns and rocket mounts.[3]
The massive expansion of American military presence in Vietnam opened a new era of war from the air. The linchpin of US Army tactics were the helicopters, and the protection of those helicopters became a vital role.[4]


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... ll_209.jpg

General characteristics
• Crew: 2 - one pilot, one CPG (co-pilot/gunner)
• Length: 44 ft 5 in (13.4 m)
• Rotor diameter: 44 ft (13.4 m)
• Height: 13 ft 5 in (4.1 m)
• Empty weight: 6,073 lb (2,754 kg)
• Max takeoff weight: 9,500 lb (4,309 kg)
• Powerplant: 1× Lycoming T53-L-13 turboshaft, 1,100 shp (820 kW)
• Rotor system: 2 blades on main rotor
Performance
• Maximum speed: 190 knots (219 mph, 352 km/h)
• Range: 310 nmi (357 mi, 574 km)
• Service ceiling: 11,400 ft (3,475 m)
• Rate of climb: 1,230 ft/min (6.25 m/s)
Armament
• 2 × 7.62 mm (0.308 in) multi-barrel Miniguns, or 2 × M129 40 mm Grenade launchers, or one of each, in the M28 turret. (When one of each was mounted, the minigun was mounted on the right side of the turret, due to feeding problems.)
• 2.75 in (70 mm) rockets - 7 rockets mounted in the M158 launcher or 19 rockets in the M200 launcher
• M18 7.62 mm Minigun pod or XM35 armament subsystem with XM195 20 mm cannon


[edit] AH-1F "Modernized" Cobra

General characteristics
• Crew: 2 - one pilot, one CPG (co-pilot/gunner)
• Length: 44 ft 7 in (13.6 m)
• Rotor diameter: ft (m)
• Height: 13 ft 5 in (4.1 m)
• Empty weight: 6,600 lb (2,993 kg)
• Max takeoff weight: 10,000 lb (4,500 kg)
• Powerplant: 1× Lycoming T53-L-703 turboshaft, 1,800 shp (1,300 kW)
• Rotor system: 2 blades on main rotor
Performance
• Maximum speed: 149 knots (172 mph, 277 km/h)
• Range: 274 nmi (315 mi, 510 km)
• Service ceiling: 12,200 ft (3,720 m)
• Rate of climb: 1,620 ft/min (8.2 m/s)
Armament
• M197 3-barreled 20 mm "Gatling-style" cannon
• Hydra 70 2.75 in (70 mm) rockets - 7 rockets mounted in the M260 launcher or 19 rockets in the M261 launcher[19]
• TOW Missiles - 4 or 8 missiles mounted in two-missile launchers on each hardpoint

_________________
let your YES be YES and your NO be NO but plz no maybe


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